Well, the board is either fixed, or it's going to run terribly. Cross your fingers and hope for the best. I'm at my technical limit right now.

Did you know,Martini Cadet ammunition in WWII?.......

Post Reply
Message
Author
User avatar
Rapidrob
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 832
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 9:10 am
Age: 67
Location: New Mexico
United States of America

Did you know,Martini Cadet ammunition in WWII?.......

#1 Post by Rapidrob » Wed Apr 17, 2019 10:39 am

One of my first rifles as a kid was a .310 Martini Cadet. I got it for 6 bucks, a whole weeks pay serving a paper route seven days a week.
Being a fan of all things History of firearms and digging into the life of these little rifles and how they were used.
An interesting side note on the use of these rifles was during WWII.
The Australians needed rifles to train troops and the Martini Cadet filled the bill very well. Out to 300 yards the cartridge was able yo keep pace with the .303 rifles for accuracy.
The folks I have known who shoot single-shot rifles do so very well. There is no rush for a rapid fire string. You take your time and “make every shot count”
The Martini Cadet rifle has a built in factor that makes it one of the best off-hand rifles ever made. It has the fastest lock time of any mass produced rifle of all time. From the time you pull the trigger until the striker is setting off the primer to fire the powder is so short the human body has little time to move off target.
With the later smokeless powder loads these little rifles really came to life. A charge of 6 grains of Cordite pushed the 120 grain bullet to 1,200 FPS for the military loading. As a reloader you can push a hard cast lead bullet even faster.
That being said and interesting twist for this cartridge was the Australians were very concerned about the Japanese Forces attacking their East coast,which as you know the Japanese did at one point in the war.
The .310 Cadet was loaded with a Spitzer FMJ and a Round nose FMJ 120 grain bullet to help arm the reserve and Home Guard citizens against the invading forces. Many of the Farmers carried these rifles in the fields.
One can only assume that this bullet was to comply with the Hague Convention and the expanding bullet ban it forbids. The all lead round nose bullet may have been deemed too inhuman.
I have not been able to find any information that this round was ever used in combat by any persons.
This round is not even as powerful as the M-1 Carbine round, but that being noted, a heavy ( for the calibre) and slow bullet is accurate and can penetrate living flesh with ease. The design of the bullet follows the typical design of the Empire in that it would tumble when it hit the enemy soldier increasing the wound channel.
All of this is speculation as far as written history is concerned as far I can find out. The rifle and it’s war time cartridge was never used in combat.
But one can invasion the well trained men and women of the reserve forces and the Home Guard in mass firing upon the invading Japanese forces in the Outback and Towns.
2f56b3346dca3cf80c92c6a71eeb6b809befb637_2_690x987.jpeg
10b3b81045dd43fb74dd0def3514b60d9b206ebc_2_689x519.jpeg
87df07cc5c042476ce373849e7656e8b1b9600fd_2_690x332.png
9b0cedf7523a2db9f1164e3394fd3612222fd127.jpeg
7c80cfe2e403a8b5d21aef181deb0840fbd50a03_2_690x268.jpeg
a859be7aeac93f9f954979dc2a011a10a3859eaf_2_690x267.jpeg
Tin Can Sailor
'Nam Vet
NRA Endowment Member
President New Mexico Military Surplus Rifle Pistol Shooters

User avatar
Cattus Borealis
Member
Member
Posts: 167
Joined: Wed Jun 14, 2017 12:46 pm
Age: 36
Location: Northern New York
United States of America

Re: Did you know,Martini Cadet ammunition in WWII?.......

#2 Post by Cattus Borealis » Wed Apr 17, 2019 2:51 pm

Great post! It looks like the 120 grain jacketed bullet was .318 in diameter. I wonder if the Privi Partizan 125 grain .323 bullet would work? It has a hollow base.

User avatar
Rapidrob
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 832
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 9:10 am
Age: 67
Location: New Mexico
United States of America

Re: Did you know,Martini Cadet ammunition in WWII?.......

#3 Post by Rapidrob » Wed Apr 17, 2019 9:29 pm

I would think so if the mouth of the case does not swell too large to chamber the round.
Tin Can Sailor
'Nam Vet
NRA Endowment Member
President New Mexico Military Surplus Rifle Pistol Shooters

User avatar
Cattus Borealis
Member
Member
Posts: 167
Joined: Wed Jun 14, 2017 12:46 pm
Age: 36
Location: Northern New York
United States of America

Re: Did you know,Martini Cadet ammunition in WWII?.......

#4 Post by Cattus Borealis » Sun Apr 21, 2019 7:07 pm

Happy Easter Everyone!

I decided to load an experimental batch of 32 Special for my Cadet Martini.

Bullet is a .323 Privi Partizan 125 grain FMJBT Hollow Base bullet

18 grains of AA5744 powder. The cartridge chambers normally.

I will test this next weekend hopefully.
Attachments
20190421_185947.jpg

User avatar
Rapidrob
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 832
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 9:10 am
Age: 67
Location: New Mexico
United States of America

Re: Did you know,Martini Cadet ammunition in WWII?.......

#5 Post by Rapidrob » Sun Apr 21, 2019 11:47 pm

Looks like a fun load to try.
I was going through my Martini stuff and found I have a .32 W/Special complete military front end.(barrel,sights,etc). Must have been pulled off decades ago and put in a corner before I got it 30 years ago in a trade.
Tin Can Sailor
'Nam Vet
NRA Endowment Member
President New Mexico Military Surplus Rifle Pistol Shooters

Post Reply

Return to “British Empire and Commonwealth”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests