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Spurs and the Great West

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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1366 Post by nrobertb » Sun Dec 01, 2019 11:40 am

Great western character actors:
Chances are you've seen his imposing character face scores of times but couldn't place the name. Colorado-born actor Walter Sande was one of those stern, heavyset character actors in Hollywood everyone recognized but no one could identify.

Born in Denver on July 9, 1906, Sande showed an early passion for music as a youth and by his college years managed to start his own band. This led to a job as musical director for 20th Century-Fox's theater chain, which in turn led to acting in films beginning in 1937. Usually providing atmospheric bits with no billing, he made an initial impression in serial cliffhangers as a third-string heavy with the popular The Green Hornet Strikes Again! (1940) and Sky Raiders (1941). His first top featured role, however, would come with The Iron Claw (1941) as Jack "Flash" Strong, a photographer who--uncharacteristically for Walter--served as a comic sidekick to the serial's hero. Best of all would be his role in another serial as Red Pennington, the amusing sidekick to Don Winslow of the Navy (1942). he repeated his role again in Don Winslow of the Coast Guard (1943), the successful sequel. The role of Pennington sparked a long and steady supporting career in movies, usually a step or two behind Hollywood's elite on camera, which included Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall in To Have and Have Not (1944) (prominently featured as the fisherman who tries to cheat Bogie), Gary Cooper in Along Came Jones (1945), Alan Ladd in The Blue Dahlia (1946), Charlton Heston in Dark City (1950) and Spencer Tracy in Bad Day at Black Rock (1955), among hundreds of others. He also lent an an authoritative presence to classic sci-fi films such as Red Planet Mars (1952), The War of the Worlds (1953) and Invaders from Mars (1953), and also had a recurring featured part in the 1940s "Boston Blackie" film series playing Detective Matthews alongside Chester Morris' former thief-turned-crime hero.

A prolific supporting player during the "golden age" of TV, Sande worked on nearly every popular western and crime show that aired throughout the 1950s and 1960s. He had a regular series role on The Adventures of Tugboat Annie (1957) as Capt. Horatio Bullwinkle, Annie's tugboat rival, and a recurring one as Inger Stevens' Swedish father, Lars "Papa" Holstrum, on The Farmer's Daughter (1963).

Walter Sande died of a heart attack in 1971 at age 65.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1367 Post by nrobertb » Mon Dec 02, 2019 9:08 am

Here are a couple more iterations of the railroad spike, this time as camp chef's knives.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1368 Post by nrobertb » Tue Dec 03, 2019 12:02 pm

If you want to learn to ride, or learn to ride better, check out the Youtube videos of Craig Cameron, called Ride Smart Horsemanship.

Craig Cameron (born 1949) is an American horse trainer. He won the Road to the Horse colt-starting contest in 2010 and has been inducted into the Texas Cowboy Hall of Fame. He was born in Texas and grew up on a ranch. He currently lives in Bluff Dale, Texas, with his wife.

Cameron competed in rodeo for many years. He rode at the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association level and specialized in bull riding. Cameron later began training horses and giving clinics on reining, training young horses and Western riding. He also founded the Extreme Cowboy Race and hosts a program on RFD-TV. In 2010, Cameron won the Road to the Horse competition. Cameron has been inducted into the Texas Cowboy Hall of Fame.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1369 Post by nrobertb » Wed Dec 04, 2019 10:15 am

Judge C. R. Magney State Park is in the state of Minnesota, on the North Shore of Lake Superior. It was named for Clarence R. Magney, a former mayor of Duluth and justice of the Minnesota Supreme Court, who was instrumental in getting 11 state parks and scenic waysides established along the North Shore. The park is best known for the Devil's Kettle, an unusual waterfall and rock formation in which half of the Brule River disappears into a pothole.

The State Park is located on scenic Minnesota State Highway 61, 25 miles from the Canada–United States border. The last 8 miles of the Brule River flow through the park, dropping 800 feet and producing several waterfalls and cascades. A tributary of the Brule, Gauthier Creek, flows in from the west. Mons Creek, an intermittent stream on the park's northeast border, drains a small marsh . This stretch of the Brule River has three named waterfalls. 1 mile (1.6 km) from the lakeshore, Lower Falls drops 7 feet over two steps just before the mouth of Gauthier Creek. A short distance upstream are Upper Falls, dropping 25 feet, and Devil's Kettle Falls. From the Devil's Kettle to Upper Falls the river flows through a .25-mile rocky gorge, as does the last .5 miles of Gauthier Creek. Developed areas and trail access are confined to the lower third of the park. The northern section is rugged and difficult to access, with open ridges stepping away from the river valley. These extremes produce an elevation change of about 1,000 feet in the park.

The park is best known for "The Devil's Kettle", an unusual waterfall located on the Brule River 1.5 miles from its mouth. The river splits in two to flow around a mass of rhyolite rock. The eastern flow goes over a two-step, 50-foot waterfall and continues downstream. The western flow surges into a pothole, falling at least 10 feet, from where it was popularly understood to "disappear underground." Visitors have reputedly dropped sticks, ping pong balls, and GPS trackers into the Devil's Kettle without seeing them resurface downstream. There is even a legend that someone pushed a car into the fissure, but given that the Devil's Kettle is wholly inaccessible by road, most commentators dismiss this as hyperbole. These stories led to speculation that the channel had a separate outlet into Lake Superior, or more implausibly plunged deep underground or connected to another watershed entirely.

For decades there was no satisfactory geological explanation for the Devil's Kettle, and it was a popular regional mystery. However, experiments conducted in late fall 2016 and announced by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources in February 2017 strongly indicated that the disappearing water simply flows back into the Brule River shortly below the falls. Two DNR experts measured the water flow above the falls and several hundred feet below them. The two readings were virtually identical, suggesting no water was being lost to some other outlet. They accounted for the failure of visitors' floating objects to reemerge by explaining that the powerful currents in the kettle's plunge pool would be enough to hold down most material until it was pulverized.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1370 Post by nrobertb » Thu Dec 05, 2019 12:19 am

Extreme Cowboy Racing is an event in which horses and riders compete over a timed trail course—one that features obstacles and tasks beyond those found on traditional show-pen trail courses.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1371 Post by nrobertb » Thu Dec 05, 2019 11:59 pm

Great western character actors:
Nehemiah Persoff (born August 2, 1919) is an American painter and actor. He appeared in more than 200 television series, films and plays in his career spanning 52 years. Born in Jerusalem, Persoff emigrated with his family to the United States in 1929 and graduated from the Hebrew Technical Institute in 1937. After serving in the United States Army during World War II, he worked as a subway electrician, maintaining signals while he began to pursue his acting career in the New York theater. In 1947, he was accepted into the Actors Studio, and was one of the 26 members of the beginners' class taught by Elia Kazan, along with James Whitmore and Julie Harris.

One of his first notable roles was as the gangster boss "Little Bonaparte", a parody of Benito Mussolini in Billy Wilder's film classic Some Like It Hot (1959). He also appeared in supporting roles in films such as The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965) and The Comancheros (1961). In the film Yentl (1983), Persoff portrayed the father of Barbra Streisand's character. He appeared in the comedy film Twins (1988), and in the American Tail animated-film series as Papa Mousekewitz. His last movie was 4 Faces (1999), which was the last film to be directed by Ted Post.

His many television credits include Five Fingers ("The Moment of Truth"), The Big Valley ("Legend of a General", Parts I & II, episode), Alfred Hitchcock Presents ("Heart of Gold" episode), The Twilight Zone ("Judgment Night"), The Untouchables, Naked City, Route 66 (two episodes), Seaway ("Last Voyage" episode, 1965), The Legend of Jesse James, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, Gunsmoke, Gilligan's Island, The Wild Wild West, The High Chaparral ("Fiesta" episode, 1970), Hawaii Five-O (7 episodes), Cannon, Ellery Queen ("The Adventure of the Pharaoh's Curse" episode), Mission: Impossible (3 episodes), Adam-12 ("Vendetta" episode), The Mod Squad and Barney Miller (2 different characters in a total of 3 episodes).

In the mid-1980s, when health problems decreased his acting workload, Persoff pursued painting, specializing in watercolor.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1372 Post by nrobertb » Fri Dec 06, 2019 10:49 pm

Buffalo Bill - The Scout is a bronze statue of a mounted rider outside the Buffalo Bill Historical Center in Cody, Wyoming, that was placed in 1924 to commemorate the town's most famous resident and de facto founder, Buffalo Bill Cody. Originally in open land on the western outskirts of Cody, the statue now stands at the end of Sheridan Avenue, which became the town's main thoroughfare as Cody grew to the west. The project was initiated by Buffalo Bill Cody's niece, Mary Jester Allen, who had established the basis of what would become the Buffalo Bill Historical Center. A New Yorker, she persuaded heiress and artist Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney to sculpt the piece.

Despite the offer of two existing sites in Cody, Vanderbilt selected and bought the final Cody site. Her first efforts attracted criticism for the type of horse, its pose, and its tack, all of which were regarded as too "eastern." She then arranged for a horse named "Smokey" from Cody's TE Ranch to be shipped to New York, along with a cowboy from Cody to pose in the saddle. The statue was dedicated on July 4, 1924 in the presence of an unusual number of dignitaries for such a remote location. It stands on a large stone base, meant to represent nearby Cedar Mountain, which Cody chose as his gravesite. The base is a consciously ironic statement, since Cody was buried, against his wishes, at Lookout Mountain in Colorado.

In time, Sheridan Avenue was extended to the statue and loops around the site. The Buffalo Bill Historical Center is located nearby.

Vanderbilt funded most of the estimated $50,000 cost for the memorial out of her own pocket. She would go on to establish the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1931. Her son, Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney would fund the establishment of the Whitney Museum of Western Art at the Buffalo Bill Historical Center.

The statue's full title is Buffalo Bill - The Scout. The statue was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974.

The old photo is my sister and I at the statue in 1950.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1373 Post by nrobertb » Sat Dec 07, 2019 4:14 pm

Two pairs of spurs by Oscar Crockett.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1374 Post by nrobertb » Sun Dec 08, 2019 10:07 am

Here's a knife from Aim Blades with an olive burl handle.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1375 Post by nrobertb » Sun Dec 08, 2019 11:33 am

Tincup Pass OHV Route is a 13 mile moderately trafficked point-to-point trail located near Almont, Colorado that features beautiful wild flowers and is rated as moderate. The trail is primarily used for off road driving and is best used from March until October.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1376 Post by nrobertb » Mon Dec 09, 2019 12:49 am

The Ames Monument is a large pyramid in Albany County, Wyoming, designed by Henry Hobson Richardson and dedicated to brothers Oakes Ames and Oliver Ames, Jr., Union Pacific Railroad financiers. The brothers garnered credit for connecting the nation by rail upon completion of the United States' First Transcontinental Railroad in 1869. Oakes, a U.S. representative to the United States Congress from Massachusetts, asserted near total control of its construction, whereas Oliver became president of the Union Pacific Railroad (1866 - 1871). In 1873 investigators implicated Oakes in fraud associated with financing of the railroad. Congress subsequently censured Oakes, who resigned in 1873. He died soon thereafter.

The Ames Monument marked the highest point on the transcontinental railroad at 8,247 feet. However, Union Pacific Railroad Company twice relocated the tracks further south, causing the town of Sherman that arose near the monument to become a ghost town.

The Ames Monument is located about 20 miles east of Laramie, Wyoming, on a wind-blown, treeless summit south of Interstate 80 at the Vedauwoo exit. The monument is a four-sided, random ashlar pyramid, 60 feet square at the base and 60 feet high, constructed of light-colored native granite. The pyramid features an interior passage, now sealed, alongside the perimeter of the structure's base.

Noted American architect H. H. Richardson designed the pyramid, which includes two 9 feet tall bas-relief portraits of the Ames brothers by sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens on the east and west sides of the pyramid's top. Saint-Gaudens chiseled the bas-reliefs from Quincy, Massachusetts, granite. The north side, which at one time faced the railroad tracks, displays one-foot-high letters grouted in the granite noting: "In Memory of Oakes Ames and Oliver Ames".

The Norcross Brothers of Worcester, Massachusetts built the monument, employing some 85 workers who lived on site, "where reportedly no liquor or gambling was allowed." Workers cut the stone for the pyramid from a granite outcropping common in the area. They then used oxen teams to skid the stone a half-mile to the work site. The rough-faced granite blocks used to construct the monument in many cases weigh several tons.

When completed in 1882, the Ames Monument was visited by many persons who were allowed to momentarily leave their trains in order to view the monolithic curiosity. It was said that when the construction of the monument was almost completed, some people had the opportunity of being lifted to the top of the monument by a special rig and from their breezy perch could view the surrounding area for a hundred miles in all directions.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1377 Post by nrobertb » Mon Dec 09, 2019 10:05 pm

Fisher Towers are a series of towers made of Cutler sandstone capped with Moenkopi sandstone and caked with a stucco of red mud located near Moab, Utah. The Towers are named for a miner who lived near them in the 1880s. The Tower is world-renowned as a subject for photography and for its classic rock climbing routes.

The nearest town is Moab, Utah about 16 miles to the southwest. The area is generally accessed from Fisher Towers Road off of Route 128 which runs along the Colorado River between I-70 and Route 191. Castleton Tower is visible approximately 6 miles to the southwest from different parts of the Fisher Tower's area

The Towers lie just south of a larger mesa which they are emerging from on a geological time scale. 1,000 feet north of the main formation there is a tower which has only partway emerged from the mesa. The Towers are composed of three major fins of rock that run from the northeast closer to the mesa out to the southwest and into a desert valley. The fins are between 1,000 and 2,000 feet long and separated from each other by about 1,000 feet. Each fin contains multiple towers, a number of which have been named.

The eastern-most section of the northern most fin is dominated by a tower known as the King Fisher. The ridge line of the fin drops considerable before reaching the western formation called Ancient Arts. The Ancient Arts is composed of four separate summits the most striking of which is the cork screw summit. The Middle fin is split into two very distinct towers known as Echo Tower in the east and Cottontail in the west. The southern most fin is best known for containing the Fisher Towers with the greatest elevation and prominence, a structure named Titan Tower. The eastern portion of the southern fin is the less well known Oracle which physically connects back to the mesa.

The area has many other named structures, such as the Cobra (which collapsed, presumably due to a lightning strike, sometime in the final week of July 2014)and the Sundial, both found in between King Fisher and Echo Tower. Each consists of balanced rocks perched above smaller supports. Another example is the Lizard Rock, a 60-foot tower near the parking lot.

The Fisher Towers were featured in the opening scene of Austin Powers in Goldmember.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1378 Post by nrobertb » Tue Dec 10, 2019 3:59 pm

Great western character actors:
John Austin "Jon" Lormer (May 7, 1906 – March 19, 1986) was an American actor, known for his guest and supporting roles in television series, such as the 1960s' Star Trek, The Twilight Zone, Perry Mason, and Peyton Place.

Lormer made guest appearances on dozens of television series, often appearing multiple times on the same series but as different characters. He appeared in three separate roles in Star Trek: The Original Series: as Dr. Theodore Haskins, in "The Cage" (and "The Menagerie"); as Tamar in "The Return of the Archons"; and as the 'Old Man' who speaks the title line in "For the World Is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky". He also played a recurring role as the postman Silas Huff in several episodes in the 1953-54 seasons (the Timmy and Lassie years) of the TV series Lassie.

From 1959-63 he made 12 appearances on Perry Mason as a medical examiner/autopsy surgeon. In 1959 he appeared in Lawman as Harry Tate a newspaper editor, in "The Big Hat". That same year he again appeared as Harry Tate on Lawman in the episode titled "The Outsider." In 1960 he played Harry Gillespie in the Rawhide episode "Incident of the Last Chance". Between 1960 and 1963 he was in four episodes of The Twilight Zone. In 1960 he played The Reverend in "Execution". In 1961 he played "Man" in "Dust". In 1962 he played Strauss in "The Last Rites of Jeff Myrtlebank" and in 1963 he played the Minister in "Jess-Belle".

He also appeared three times on "The Andy Griffith Show", in 1962 as Fletch Dilbeck (episode: Bailey's Bad Boy), and as Tate Fletcher (The Cow Thief) and in 1964 he played the part of Parnell Rigsby, a farmer who lost his wallet. He also played Reverend Jimson's father in "The Renegade" and Tuscarora tribesman Yellow Knife in "The Flaming Rocks" which were episodes of Daniel Boone.

From 1966 to 1968 he made numerous appearances as Judge Chester on the series Peyton Place.

In 1967 he played George Ramsey, a building caretaker with a mischievous kitten bent on destruction, for the TV series Lassie episode "The Eighth Life of Henry IV". That same year he appeared as Dr. Pierre Blanchard in the fourth season of the science-fiction television show Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea in the episode named "Fatal Cargo".

In 1971 Lormer appeared as the doctor on The Men From Shiloh (rebranded name for the TV western The Virginian) in the episode titled "The Angus Killer."

In 1981 he appeared as Barker, the bumbling butler, in the Magnum, P.I. episode "Ghost Writer".

He appeared in many films, often uncredited. His credited film appearances include One Man's Way (1963), Zebra in the Kitchen (1965), A Fine Madness (1966), The Singing Nun (1966), The Learning Tree (1969), Getting Straight (1970), The Legend of Lizzie Borden (1975), Rooster Cogburn (1975) and The Boogens (1981). He also appeared as Nathan Grantham in the 1982 horror-comedy film Creepshow.

His last television appearance was in a May 1985 episode of Highway to Heaven.

On March 19, 1986, Lormer died of cancer at Saint Joseph Medical Center in Burbank, California. He was 79 years old.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1379 Post by nrobertb » Wed Dec 11, 2019 10:52 am

The Mint 400 is an annual American desert off-road race which takes place in Las Vegas, Nevada. It was resumed in 2008 after a 20-year hiatus.

The race was for both motorcycles, until 1977, and four-wheel vehicles (buggies, cars and trucks) sponsored by Del Webb's Mint Hotel and Casino. Del Webb, a real estate developer and friend of Howard Hughes, was owner of the Mint Hotel in downtown Las Vegas. It became known as The Great American Desert Race.

In 1967, Norm Johnson organized the first ever "Mint 400 Off-Road Rally" to promote and publicize The Mint Hotel. Norm sent two matching dune buggies across 600 miles of desert, from The Mint Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada, to the Sahara Hotel in Lake Tahoe, California. The coverage by the national media caught the attention of race teams and off-road enthusiasts everywhere and the endurance race became famous overnight.

The future of the Mint 400 race came into question in 1988 following the sale of Del Webbs Mint Hotel and Casino to next door neighbor Jack Binion owner of the Horseshoe Club. However, as a testament to the race itself, the prestige and importance of the event created by veteran race director K.J. Howe and the Mint management team and the financial benefit this promotion brought to the City of Las Vegas, under new ownership the annual Mint 400 Off Road Race continued to be run in 1988 and 1989.

Unfortunately new owner Binion felt the race and its ancillary activities along Fremont Street had a negative impact on his casinos. Despite the race's importance to the sport of off-road racing and the local community, one of the toughest racing events on United States soil was gone following the 1989 Mint 400.

The Mint went quiet for nearly twenty years – but was resurrected by long-time sponsor General Tire with help from the Southern Nevada Off-Road Enthusiasts group. General Tire has been the title sponsor of the race ever since. SNORE eventually sold the franchise to film and television producers Matt and Joshua Martelli – marking the next significant chapter in the Mints evolution. The race resumed on March 29, 2008. The race was preceded by inspections of the vehicles on Fremont Street in the Fremont East district.

In 2012 The Martelli Brothers partnered with off-road industry veteran Casey Folks, owner of the largest off-road desert racing organization in the world, the Best In The Desert Racing Association. The Mint was added to the Best in the Desert championship schedule, and a new 100 mi race loop was carved out for the 400 mi contest. The number of entries swelled to an astounding three hundred and twenty three race teams, making the Mint 400 one of the largest off-road races in the world.

Entrants in this event were worldwide and included some of the most well-known names from all racing genres as well as the television and motion picture industry. Indianapolis 500 winners Parnelli Jones, Al Unser, Rick Mears, and Rodger Ward; off-road champions Mickey Thompson, Ivan Stewart, Jack Flannery, Walker Evans; international off-road competitor, Rod Hall; power boat champion Bill Muncey, film and television stars James Garner, Steve McQueen, Larry Wilcox and Patrick Dempsey; comedian Mort Sahl; astronaut Gordon Cooper and rock musician Ted Nugent are among the many racing and entertainment luminaries who competed in the Mint 400. Jay Leno raced with Jerry Zaiden from Camburg Racing, Heavy D & Diesel Dave from the Discovery Channel show, Diesel Brothers competed in the Mint 400 in 2017. Heavy D & Diesel Dave's race in the Mint 400 was featured on the show in the episode from Season 3, "Race Against the Machine".
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1380 Post by nrobertb » Wed Dec 11, 2019 11:09 pm

Two hours west of San Antonio is a place to experience the ultimate in big boy toys. Want to shoot a German PAK-40 antitank gun, or drive and shoot a Sherman tank, plus many other options? Check out drivetanks.com
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