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Spurs and the Great West

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OLDGUNNER
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#841 Post by OLDGUNNER » Sat Dec 08, 2018 8:41 pm

Okay, some on topic...I have been watching westerns off and on all afternoon. I have asked this question only once of a real horseman here. He passed away about 5 years ago at 92. He was born and raised right here. He had and rode horses since he was two maybe. I was a kid in country Iowa during the middle 40’s. My dad had maybe a dozen horses off and on. I rode those horses.
My question for anyone here...how do the horses in the western movies run across the shallow rivers without breaking their legs on the slippery rocks on the river bottoms? I have ridden horses across all kinds of creek bottoms, but slowly, just walking, and had trouble with that one time. So....I ask my friend here, and he said, “Well, I don’t know.”

He didn’t know..He made it ashore at Omaha Beach when he was 19 and crawled to Germany and came back here and raised cattle and horses right up to when he died. I have a wild idea but really wild. But it is the only one that I can think of. He is in a well known WW2 picture, I will find it and post it.

So, anyone, how do they do it?

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http://www.apimages.com/Collection/Land ... 37bb7eb596

Okay my friend here said that he was in this picture....In the first row of four pictures, second picture from left. From the right border with the two in helmets in front, he was in the third row at a 45 to the back and left of the second row. I just saw where this scene was on a US three cent postage stamp. He never mentioned it...I don’t think that he knew of it.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#842 Post by nrobertb » Sat Dec 08, 2018 10:26 pm

A damascus bladed knife.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#843 Post by nrobertb » Sun Dec 09, 2018 11:43 am

Massacre Rocks State Park is a history-focused public recreation area in the Northwest United States featuring the Massacre Rocks, a famous spot along the Oregon Trail and California Trail during the middle 19th century. The state park is located along the Snake River, ten miles southwest of American Falls, in Power County, Idaho.

The park features a configuration of boulders along the south bank of the Snake River, known alternatively as Massacre Rocks, "Gate of Death", or "Devil's Gate". Emigrants gave this name to the narrow passage of the trail through the rocks, from the fear of possible ambush by Native Americans. Some confrontations may have occurred there, but they remain unverified. The Clark Massacre of 1851 occurred just west of Massacre Rocks, closer to the Raft River.

The rocks were often used as campsite for wagon trains along the trail. Many emigrants carved their names and dates on Register Rock, which is now protected by a shelter. The actual passage through the rocks is now the route of Interstate 86 along the south edge of the park.

Geologically, the park was created during the repeated volcanic activity on the Snake River Plain. The rocks themselves were deposited in their present location at the end of the last ice age, approximately 14,500 years ago, during the catastrophic flood known as the Bonneville Flood, when much of Lake Bonneville surged down the Snake River. A notch in the cliff on the north bank of the Snake opposite the park was the site of an ancient waterfall of a side channel of the waters in the aftermath of the flood.

Massacre Rocks became a state park in 1967, following earlier status as a roadside park managed by the Idaho Department of Transportation.

The park is accessible by automobile on Interstate 86 and by foot using a trail from the rest areas just east of the park on Interstate 86. The footpaths also provide access to remnants of the original Oregon Trail on the south side of the highway. Exhibits in the park's visitor center describe the history and geology of the park. The park offers trails for hiking and biking, disc golf course, campground, and access to the Snake River.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#844 Post by nrobertb » Sun Dec 09, 2018 11:45 am

As to how the horses could cross rivers safely, I imagine the route was carefully scouted in advance to find a sandy bottom.

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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#845 Post by OLDGUNNER » Sun Dec 09, 2018 1:07 pm

Well, that is the first part of just what I thought...and then add a careful probing of the bottom so as to disclose any under-sand rocks. Other wise they just ain’t going to do that.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#846 Post by nrobertb » Mon Dec 10, 2018 10:28 am

Great western character actor:

Mort Mills was born on January 11, 1919 in New York City, New York, USA as Mortimer Morris Kaplan. He was an actor, known for Psycho (1960), Touch of Evil (1958) and Torn Curtain (1966). He was married to Elizabeth (Betty) Dellball Pentland and Mary Loretta Grady. He died on June 6, 1993 in Ventura, California, USA.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#847 Post by nrobertb » Mon Dec 10, 2018 3:32 pm

A nice silver and malachite bracelet.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#848 Post by nrobertb » Tue Dec 11, 2018 12:02 pm

Arch Canyon is a twelve mile long box canyon located north of highway 95 in Utah. The canyon has beautiful redrock walls, and it is possible to see several arches. The creek that runs along the bottom of the canyon normally has water (all water should be treated prior to drinking). Look along the canyon walls for hanging gardens. As you look for hanging gardens, you are also likely to spot cliff dwellings. Please remember to treat these special places with respect. This trail has no visitor fee.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#849 Post by nrobertb » Tue Dec 11, 2018 5:23 pm

A knife by Rossatti.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#850 Post by nrobertb » Wed Dec 12, 2018 10:58 am

Today, Echo Bluff State Park in Missouri is a year-round outdoor destination that allows visitors to create new memories as they experience all the Ozarks have to offer. Visitors of all ages can fill their days with floating, hiking, swimming or fishing. While the park has a spectacular natural setting, the modern amenities enhance the experience and make it welcoming for everyone. An impressive, iconic lodge features guest rooms, indoor and outdoor casual dining and meeting rooms. Nine full-service cabins with 13 units are a great option for families and groups. Camping opportunities range from primitive to full-service campsites. The bluff-top shelter is perfect for special events and an amphitheater for smaller events offers a dramatic natural backdrop. The park also offers hiking and mountain biking trails.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#851 Post by nrobertb » Wed Dec 12, 2018 3:40 pm

Great western character actors:

Royal Dano was undoubtedly one of the best, most quirky and striking character actors to ever grace the big and small screen alike in a lengthy and impressive career which spanned 42 years. Royal ran away from home at age twelve and lived in such states as Texas, Florida and California. He struck a deal with his father to continue his education, but still be able to travel around the country. Dano eventually attended New York University. His performing career began as part of the 44th Special Service Provisional Company during World War II. Dano soon branched out to the New York stage and made his Broadway debut with a small role in the hit musical "Finian's Rainbow." Tall and lean, with a gaunt face, dark hair, a rangy build, and a very distinctive deep croaky voice, Dano was usually cast in both movies and TV shows as gloomy and/or sinister characters. He appeared most often in westerns and worked several times with James Stewart and director Anthony Mann. He made his film debut in Undercover Girl (1950). Dano's more memorable roles include the Tattered Soldier in The Red Badge of Courage (1951), a sickly bookworm bad guy in Johnny Guitar (1954), Elijah in Moby Dick (1956), Peter in King of Kings (1961), a cattle rustler in The Culpepper Cattle Co. (1972), a coroner in Electra Glide in Blue (1973), a profanity-spewing preacher in Big Bad Mama (1974), Ten Spot in The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976), a weary factory line worker in Take This Job and Shove It (1981), a lightening rod salesman in Something Wicked This Way Comes (1983), a caterwauling minister who showed up at the doors of newly widowed wives of test pilots, and sang "Eternal Father Strong To Save" in The Right Stuff (1983). He was a stuffy high school teacher in Teachers (1984), rascally zombie old-timer Gramps in House II: The Second Story (1987), a cantankerous farmer in Killer Klowns from Outer Space (1988), and in his last part, a cemetery caretaker in George A. Romero's The Dark Half (1993). Among the numerous TV shows Dano did guest spots on are Twin Peaks (1990), Amazing Stories (1985), CHiPs (1977), Quincy M.E. (1976), Fantasy Island (1977), Little House on the Prairie (1974), Kung Fu (1972), Ben Casey (1961), Planet of the Apes (1974), Cannon (1971), Playhouse 90 (1956), Lost in Space (1965), Gunsmoke (1955), Bonanza (1959), Wagon Train (1957), The Virginian (1962), Hawaii Five-O (1968), Alfred Hitchcock Presents (1955), Wanted: Dead or Alive (1958), Night Gallery (1969), Route 66 (1960), The Rifleman (1958), and Rawhide (1959). Moreover, Dano did the voice of the animatronic Abraham Lincoln for Walt Disney's Hall of Presidents for both Disneyland and Disney World. Dano also portrayed Lincoln on the Omnibus (1952) television series. He's the father of actor Rick Dano. Royal Dano died at age 71 of a heart attack on May 15th, 1994.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#852 Post by nrobertb » Wed Dec 12, 2018 11:35 pm

Considered the First Lady of Rodeo, Tad Lucas changed the rodeo world forever with her showstopping trick riding. Lucas became a worldwide sensation in the 1920s and 30s, traveling with a Wild West Show-style rodeo company. She was influential in keeping women's rodeo programs alive, helping to establish the Girl's Rodeo Association in 1948. Lucas is the only woman to be inducted into the National Rodeo Hall of Fame, Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame and the National Cowgirl Hall of Fame.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#853 Post by nrobertb » Thu Dec 13, 2018 12:00 pm

Spurs by Sliester of Auberry, California.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#854 Post by nrobertb » Thu Dec 13, 2018 4:53 pm

Bareback bronc and saddle bronc styles are very different. In saddle bronc, the rider uses a specialized saddle with free swinging stirrups and no horn. The saddle bronc rider grips a simple rein braided from cotton or polyester and attached to a leather halter worn by the horse. The rider lifts on the rein and attempts to find a rhythm with the animal by spurring forwards and backwards with their feet in a sweeping motion from shoulder to flank.

The bareback rider does not use a saddle or rein, but uses a rigging that consists of a leather and rawhide composite piece often compared to a suitcase handle attached to a surcingle and placed just behind the horse's withers. The rider leans back and spurs with an up and down motion from the horse's point of shoulder toward the rigging handle, spurring at each jump in rhythm with the motion of the horse.

Bareback bronc riding began to develop as a professional rodeo sporting event around 1900. The riding equipment used during that era varied. In some cases, the rider simply held onto the horse's mane, called a mane-hold. Others held a loose or twisted rope tied around the horse's girth, and other methods involved using multiple handhold leather riggings based on a surcingle. In the early 1920s, when the old rodeo rules allowing two handed riding were being phased out and replaced with the newer rule of riding with one hand in the rigging and one hand in the air, Earl Bascom invented, designed and made rodeo's first one-hand bareback rigging. The original one-handed rigging was made by Bascom from a section of rubber belting discarded from a threshing machine, with the entire rigging—the handhold and the body—all made as one piece. The handhold was folded back and riveted to the main body of the rigging, with a 'D' ring riveted on each side for tying the latigos. This rigging was first used at the Raymond Stampede in Alberta, Canada in July 1924. Bascom then refined the design, making his second one-handhold rigging out of leather and rawhide. Sole leather was used for the rigging body. Strips of leather, with rawhide sewed between, were used for the handhold with sheepskin glued under the handholds to protect the knuckles; this arrangement became known as "Bascom's Rigging". Honored in several Halls of Fame, Bascom is now known as the "Father of the Modern-day Bareback Rigging". Variations of Bascom's rigging are still used in rodeos today.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#855 Post by nrobertb » Fri Dec 14, 2018 10:21 am

Barrel racing is a rodeo event in which a horse and rider attempt to complete a cloverleaf pattern around preset barrels in the fastest time. Though both boys and girls compete at the youth level, in collegiate and professional ranks, it is a rodeo event for women.
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