Well, the board is either fixed, or it's going to run terribly. Cross your fingers and hope for the best. I'm at my technical limit right now.

Spurs and the Great West

Message
Author
User avatar
nrobertb
Gun Nut
Gun Nut
Posts: 838
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#781 Post by nrobertb » Sat Nov 10, 2018 5:54 pm

A pair of Blanchard spurs.
Attachments
Blanch6.jpg
Blanch6.jpg (10.38 KiB) Viewed 309 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Gun Nut
Gun Nut
Posts: 838
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#782 Post by nrobertb » Sun Nov 11, 2018 11:32 am

Antoine Robidoux (September 24, 1794 – August 29, 1860) was a fur trapper and trader of French-Canadian descent best known for his exploits in the American Southwest in the first half of the 19th century.

Robidoux was born in 1794 in Saint Louis, the fourth of six sons of Joseph Robidoux III, the owner of a Saint Louis-based fur trading company. The Robidoux family is strongly connected to the history of the North American fur trade, with all of Joseph Robidoux's sons having participated to one degree or another in the family business.

Antoine spoke English, French, and Spanish. In his early years he helped his father extend his business westward, and by the 1820s was focused on developing trade routes in the intermountain corridors of what was at the time the Mexican province of Santa Fe de Nuevo México. In the summer of 1824, Antoine may have joined a party led by Etienne Provost that traveled to the Uinta Basin to trade for pelts. He eventually established a permanent residence in the capital city of Santa Fe, and in 1828, he took for his common-law wife Carmel Benevides (1812–1888), the daughter of a Spanish captain who was killed fighting the Comanche and subsequently the adopted daughter of the provincial governor.

In 1829, Antoine and his younger brother Louis Robidoux petitioned for and were granted Mexican citizenship, which freed them to trade and settle in Mexican territory without having to worry about expensive tariffs and other international restrictions, as well as near-exclusive license to trap and trade in the Ute country of what is now western Colorado and eastern Utah. By 1830, Antoine had become a prominent citizen of Santa Fe in social and economic circles. He was even elected the first non-Mexican alcalde of the ayuntamiento (the municipal council), though his political career was short-lived.

Around the same time, and possibly in partnership with Louis, Antoine established Fort Uncompahgre near the confluence of the Gunnison River (then known as the Río San Xavier) and the Uncompahgre River in west-central Colorado. Though the exact date of its completion is unknown, Robidoux's post was arguably the first permanent trading operation west of the continental divide. In 1832, Robidoux purchased the Reed Trading Post, a single cabin built by William Reed and Denis Julien four years earlier at the confluence of the Uinta and Whiterocks rivers in northeastern Utah, and rebuilt it much larger as Fort Robidoux, also called Fort Uintah and Fort Winty. The fort was visited by many well-known pioneers and mountain men during its years of operation, including Marcus Whitman, Miles Goodyear, and Kit Carson.

Robidoux spent more than a decade managing both trading posts and exploring the Western interior. He is especially well known for having carved a famous rock inscription on a wall of Utah's Westwater Canyon during this time. Likely ascending a trapper's trail from the canyon's mouth on the Colorado River, Robidoux left the following record of his presence engraved on a sandstone bluff:

ANTOINE ROBIDOUX
PASSÉ ICI LE 13 NOVEMBRE
1837
POUR ETABLIRE MAISON
TRAITTE A LA
RV. VERT OU WIYTÉ

The most direct translation from the French reads "Antoine Robidoux passed here 13 November 1837 to establish a trading post at the Green or Wiyté River".

Both Fort Uncompahgre and Fort Robidoux were evidently attacked and destroyed by Utes in 1844, just as the fur trade was declining with changes in the European market. These circumstances prompted Robidoux to quickly abandon his fur enterprise and return east to St. Joseph. Over the next decade, he worked in various capacities as an emigrant guide and a U.S. Army interpreter. In June 1846, Robidoux enlisted as an interpreter with General Stephen W. Kearny's expedition to California during the Mexican–American War. He was severely wounded at the Battle of San Pasqual in December and later applied for a government pension.

Robidoux died in 1860 in St. Joseph, Missouri, at the age of 65.
Attachments
Antoine2.jpg
Antoine2.jpg (34.34 KiB) Viewed 293 times
Antoine.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Gun Nut
Gun Nut
Posts: 838
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#783 Post by nrobertb » Sun Nov 11, 2018 5:12 pm

Heishi (from the Santo Domingo word meaning “shell”) traditionally referred to necklace shell beads. Today, however, it describes tiny, handmade beads of any material. The Santo Domingo Pueblo carvers are the most proficient heishi producers. To make the minuscule beads, the material (shell, stone, or coral) is sliced into strips, and then cut into small squares, after which holes are drilled through the center. Strung together, the rough squares are shaped and smoothed by holding the string against a turning stone wheel. In the process, 60 – 70% of the original material is lost.
Attachments
heshi.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Gun Nut
Gun Nut
Posts: 838
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#784 Post by nrobertb » Mon Nov 12, 2018 10:40 am

Almost every fall we head west on I-80 for Colorado. We always see trucks hauling pieces of wind generators. There is a large field of them in the hill country of Iowa. There is even a state rest stop that has a blade for a decoration. The largest field I've seen is on the plains of Colorado east of the Rocky Mountains. As you head south on hwy. 71, you come to a long ridge that extends for miles. It is covered with hundreds of wind generators, as far as the eye can see.
Attachments
turbine.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Gun Nut
Gun Nut
Posts: 838
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#785 Post by nrobertb » Mon Nov 12, 2018 6:16 pm

The Salton Sea is a shallow, saline, endorheic rift lake located directly on the San Andreas Fault, predominantly in the U.S. state of California's Imperial and Coachella valleys.

The lake occupies the lowest elevations of the Salton Sink in the Colorado Desert of Imperial and Riverside counties in Southern California. The sea is fed by the New, Whitewater, and Alamo Rivers, as well as agricultural runoff, drainage systems, and creeks.

Over millions of years, the Colorado River has flowed into the Imperial Valley and deposited soil (creating fertile farmland), building up the terrain and constantly changing the course of the river. For thousands of years, the river has flowed into and out of the valley alternately, creating a freshwater lake, an increasingly saline lake, and a dry desert basin, depending on river flows and the balance between inflow and evaporative loss. The cycle of filling has been about every 400–500 years and has repeated itself many times. The latest natural cycle occurred around 1600–1700 as remembered by Native Americans who talked with the first European settlers. Fish traps still exist at many locations, and the Native Americans evidently moved the traps depending upon the cycle.

The most recent inflow of water from the now heavily controlled Colorado River was accidentally created by the engineers of the California Development Company in 1905. In an effort to increase water flow into the area for farming, irrigation canals were dug from the Colorado River into the valley. The canals suffered silt buildup, so a cut was made in the bank of the Colorado River to further increase the water flow. The resulting outflow overwhelmed the engineered canal, and the river flowed into the Salton Basin for two years, filling the historic dry lake bed and creating the modern sea, before repairs were completed.

The lake's salinity, about 56 grams per litre, is greater than that of the waters of the Pacific Ocean (35 g/l), but less than that of the Great Salt Lake (which ranges from 50 to 270 g/l). Recently, the concentration has been increasing at a rate of about 3% per year. About 4,000,000 short tons of salt are deposited in the valley each year.
Attachments
Salton_Seajpg.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Gun Nut
Gun Nut
Posts: 838
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#786 Post by nrobertb » Tue Nov 13, 2018 11:53 am

A turquoise nugget necklace.
Attachments
n ecklace.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Gun Nut
Gun Nut
Posts: 838
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#787 Post by nrobertb » Tue Nov 13, 2018 4:26 pm

Great western character actors: Warren Oates.

Warren Oates was an American character actor of the 1960s and 1970s and early 1980s whose distinctive style and intensity brought him to offbeat leading roles.

Oates was born in Depoy, a very small Kentucky town. He was the son of Sarah Alice (Mercer) and Bayless Earle Oates, a general store owner. He attended high school in Louisville, continuing on to the University of Louisville and military service with the U.S. Marines.

By 1957 he had begun appearing in live dramas such as Studio One in Hollywood (1948), but Oates' rural drawl seemed more fitted for the Westerns that were proliferating on the big screen at the time, so he moved to Hollywood and immediately stared getting steady work as an increasingly prominent supporting player, often as either craven or vicious types. With his role as one of the Hammond brothers in the Sam Peckinpah masterpiece Ride the High Country (1962), Oates found a niche both as an actor and as a colleague of one of the most distinguished and distinctive directors of the period. Peckinpah used Oates repeatedly, and Oates, in large part due to the prominence given him by Peckinpah, became one of those rare character actors whose name and face is as familiar as those of many leading stars. He began to play roles which, while still character parts, were also leads, particularly in cult hits like Two-Lane Blacktop (1971) and Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974).

Although never destined to be a traditional leading man, Oates remained one of Hollywood's most valued and in-demand character players up until his sudden death from a heart attack on April 3, 1982 at the age of 53.
Attachments
warren2.jpg
warren.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Gun Nut
Gun Nut
Posts: 838
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#788 Post by nrobertb » Wed Nov 14, 2018 10:08 am

A nice Navajo ring, necklace and pendant.
Attachments
beads.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Gun Nut
Gun Nut
Posts: 838
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#789 Post by nrobertb » Wed Nov 14, 2018 11:17 pm

Great western character actors: Glen Strange.

George Glenn Strange (August 16, 1899 – September 20, 1973) was an American actor who mostly appeared in Western films. He is best remembered for playing Frankenstein's monster in three Universal films during the 1940s and for his role as Sam Noonan, the popular bartender on CBS's Gunsmoke television series.

Strange was born in Weed, New Mexico Territory, 13 years prior to New Mexico gaining statehood. He was the fourth child of William Russell Strange and the former Sarah Eliza Byrd. An eighth generation grandson of Pocahontas and John Rolfe, he was of Irish and Cherokee descent and was a cousin of the Western film star and narrator Rex Allen.

Strange grew up in the West Texas town of Cross Cut. His father was a bartender and later a rancher. Strange learned by ear how to play the fiddle and guitar. By the time he was 12, young Strange was performing at cowboy dances. By 1928, he was on radio in El Paso, Texas. He was a young rancher, but in 1930, he came to Hollywood as a member of the radio singing group Arizona Wranglers. Strange joined the singers after having appeared at a rodeo in Prescott, Arizona.

In 1932, Strange had a minor role as part of the Wrecker's gang in a 12-part serial, The Hurricane Express, starring John Wayne. He procured his first motion picture role in 1932 and appeared in hundreds of films during his lifetime. He played numerous small parts in Paramount's popular Hopalong Cassidy film series, usually cast as a member of an outlaw's gang and occasionally as a local sheriff. Beginning in 1949, he portrayed Butch Cavendish, the villain responsible for killing all of the Texas Rangers except one in the long-running television series The Lone Ranger.

Strange appeared twice as Jim Wade on Bill Williams's syndicated western series geared to juvenile audience's The Adventures of Kit Carson. He also appeared twice as Blake in the syndicated western The Cisco Kid. In 1952, he was cast in the role of Chief Black Cloud in the episode "Indian War Party" of the syndicated The Range Rider. In 1954, Strange played Sheriff Billy Rowland in Jim Davis's syndicated western series Stories of the Century. Strange appeared six times in 1956 in multiple roles on Edgar Buchanan's syndicated Judge Roy Bean. In 1958, he had a minor part in an episode of John Payne's The Restless Gun and had an important role in the 1958 episode "Chain Gang" of the western series 26 Men, true stories about the Arizona Rangers. That same year he played the rancher Pat Cafferty, who faces the threat of anthrax, in the episode "Queen of the Cimarron" of the syndicated western series, Frontier Doctor. Strange appeared in six episodes of The Rifleman playing the same role in different variations: Cole, the stagecoach driver, in "Duel of Honor" (episode 7); a stagecoach shotgun guard in "The Dead-eye Kid" (episode 20); Joey, a stagecoach driver, in "The Woman" (episode 32); as well as an unnamed stagecoach driver in "The Blowout" (episode 43), "The Spiked Rifle" (episode 49) and "Miss Bertie" (episode 90).

Strange was cast in five episodes of the ABC western The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp and three segments of the syndicated Annie Oakley. In 1959, he
appeared in another western syndicated series, Mackenzie's Raiders, in the episode entitled "Apache Boy". Strange first appeared on Gunsmoke in 1959 and assumed several roles on the long-running program before he was permanently cast as the stolid bartender.
Attachments
glenn2.jpg
glenn2.jpg (28.33 KiB) Viewed 161 times
GLEN.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Gun Nut
Gun Nut
Posts: 838
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#790 Post by nrobertb » Thu Nov 15, 2018 10:17 am

I'm starting to restore this portable forge, every inch of which is caked in rust and grime. The pan is cracked so I'll have to find someone to weld that. It should be a fun project.
Attachments
DSC08734.JPG

User avatar
nrobertb
Gun Nut
Gun Nut
Posts: 838
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#791 Post by nrobertb » Thu Nov 15, 2018 3:51 pm

A pair of Garcia spurs.
Attachments
Garcia7.jpg
Garcia7.jpg (23.83 KiB) Viewed 140 times

indy1919a4
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 515
Joined: Sat Jun 10, 2017 12:23 pm
Age: 56
Location: Indianapolis, Indiana
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#792 Post by indy1919a4 » Thu Nov 15, 2018 6:09 pm

nrobertb wrote:
Wed Nov 14, 2018 11:17 pm
Great western character actors: Glen Strange.

George Glenn Strange (August 16, 1899 – September 20, 1973) was an American actor who mostly appeared in Western films. He is best remembered for playing Frankenstein's monster in three Universal films during the 1940s and for his role as Sam Noonan, the popular bartender on CBS's Gunsmoke television series.

Strange was born in Weed, New Mexico Territory, 13 years prior to New Mexico gaining statehood. He was the fourth child of William Russell Strange and the former Sarah Eliza Byrd. An eighth generation grandson of Pocahontas and John Rolfe, he was of Irish and Cherokee descent and was a cousin of the Western film star and narrator Rex Allen.

Strange grew up in the West Texas town of Cross Cut. His father was a bartender and later a rancher. Strange learned by ear how to play the fiddle and guitar. By the time he was 12, young Strange was performing at cowboy dances. By 1928, he was on radio in El Paso, Texas. He was a young rancher, but in 1930, he came to Hollywood as a member of the radio singing group Arizona Wranglers. Strange joined the singers after having appeared at a rodeo in Prescott, Arizona.

In 1932, Strange had a minor role as part of the Wrecker's gang in a 12-part serial, The Hurricane Express, starring John Wayne. He procured his first motion picture role in 1932 and appeared in hundreds of films during his lifetime. He played numerous small parts in Paramount's popular Hopalong Cassidy film series, usually cast as a member of an outlaw's gang and occasionally as a local sheriff. Beginning in 1949, he portrayed Butch Cavendish, the villain responsible for killing all of the Texas Rangers except one in the long-running television series The Lone Ranger.

Strange appeared twice as Jim Wade on Bill Williams's syndicated western series geared to juvenile audience's The Adventures of Kit Carson. He also appeared twice as Blake in the syndicated western The Cisco Kid. In 1952, he was cast in the role of Chief Black Cloud in the episode "Indian War Party" of the syndicated The Range Rider. In 1954, Strange played Sheriff Billy Rowland in Jim Davis's syndicated western series Stories of the Century. Strange appeared six times in 1956 in multiple roles on Edgar Buchanan's syndicated Judge Roy Bean. In 1958, he had a minor part in an episode of John Payne's The Restless Gun and had an important role in the 1958 episode "Chain Gang" of the western series 26 Men, true stories about the Arizona Rangers. That same year he played the rancher Pat Cafferty, who faces the threat of anthrax, in the episode "Queen of the Cimarron" of the syndicated western series, Frontier Doctor. Strange appeared in six episodes of The Rifleman playing the same role in different variations: Cole, the stagecoach driver, in "Duel of Honor" (episode 7); a stagecoach shotgun guard in "The Dead-eye Kid" (episode 20); Joey, a stagecoach driver, in "The Woman" (episode 32); as well as an unnamed stagecoach driver in "The Blowout" (episode 43), "The Spiked Rifle" (episode 49) and "Miss Bertie" (episode 90).

Strange was cast in five episodes of the ABC western The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp and three segments of the syndicated Annie Oakley. In 1959, he
appeared in another western syndicated series, Mackenzie's Raiders, in the episode entitled "Apache Boy". Strange first appeared on Gunsmoke in 1959 and assumed several roles on the long-running program before he was permanently cast as the stolid bartender.
Strange was one of those hollywood greats that are so often overlooked because of a lack of a fawning press agent ..

He was also a real Deputy sheriff, and was originally chosen to be the creature of Creature of Black lagoon fame

User avatar
nrobertb
Gun Nut
Gun Nut
Posts: 838
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#793 Post by nrobertb » Fri Nov 16, 2018 10:43 am

Wolf Creek Pass, once a two-lane road winding through the San Juan Mountains between South Fork, Colorado and Pagosa Springs, has recently been expanded into a multi-lane highway, greatly increasing the traffic capacity of the pass and making it more navigable in bad weather. It will also become the easiest access to southwest Colorado from the rest of the state, as all remaining overland routes require lengthy detours through New Mexico or over Lizard Head Pass, near Telluride, or the intimidating Red Mountain Pass: a two-lane road winding along sheer cliffs from Ouray to Silverton.

A 900-foot tunnel on the eastern portion was opened November 5, 2005. Construction was completed in the Summer of 2006, with the highway fully widened and drainage projects along the route completed.

The pass is also home to Wolf Creek ski area located on the eastern side of the Continental Divide on Highway 160. Also on the eastern side is one of the largest RV parks in the United States, located just a few miles west of South Fork, Colorado.

Wolf Creek Pass is also an attraction for tourists, as it is known for the natural beauty of the wilderness the highway passes through. Just west of the pass, about 15 miles east of Pagosa Springs, Treasure Falls offers passers by a dramatic view of a mountain waterfall.
Attachments
Wolf.jpg
Wolf.jpg (16.35 KiB) Viewed 109 times
Wolf_Creek_Pass_Tunnel.JPG
Wolf_Creek_Pass_Tunnel.JPG (12.49 KiB) Viewed 109 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Gun Nut
Gun Nut
Posts: 838
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#794 Post by nrobertb » Fri Nov 16, 2018 4:44 pm

A pair of spurs by J.R, McChesney.
Attachments
McCHESNEY2.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Gun Nut
Gun Nut
Posts: 838
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#795 Post by nrobertb » Sat Nov 17, 2018 11:05 am

The first time I took this road in 1963, all 3 tunnels were open. Now the one closest to Colorado Springs is closed due to rockfall.

Gold Camp Road is a highly scenic dirt trail from Colorado Springs to near Victor, with a length of 8.6 miles one way. It was easily passable in any passenger vehicle, with gentle grades and usually gentle curves. The two remaining (three if you count the collapsed tunnel) Gold Camp Road Tunnels set into the hills of Colorado Springs' Bear Creek Park are said to be severely haunted, and while this is just superstition, the threatening claws of the fence guarding one of the tunnels aren't doing anything to discourage the stories.

The surface of the road is gravel and sand, and chains or snow tyres can be required anytime. This stretch of road should not be attempted by novice drivers. There are also tales of rail workers haunting the place (the tunnels used to be for railway lines) so you could catch a glimpse of one or those. The road opened in 1920’s but it was a car toll road. In 1988 the tunnel #3 collapsed and was never repaired. Because of this, the road is now closed to vehicular traffic and is popular with bikers and hikers. Anyways, a detour has been built to bypass over it. This location is a popular hangout for high schoolers and teens, especially on summer nights. When the tunnels were built in the 1800’s – it’s said that many workers died in actually building the tunnels. There have been rumblings of a school bus accident ranging from a suicidal driver to an oncoming train. Legend has it that the entire bus full of children perished. Today, many drive through the 2nd tunnel waiting for the car to be moved after putting it in park and turning off the lights. Others have said to see apparitions of men in cloaks. The third tunnel, you are not able to drive through but many peer in wondering the secrets of this spooky spot.
Attachments
Gold Camp Road0.jpg

Post Reply

Return to “General Off Topic”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 9 guests