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Spurs and the Great West

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nrobertb
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#736 Post by nrobertb » Sat Oct 13, 2018 11:35 am

The original Tacoma Narrows Bridge roadway twisted and vibrated violently under 40-mile-per-hour winds on the day of the collapse
Other name(s) Galloping Gertie
Characteristics
Design Suspension
Total length 5,939 feet
Longest span 2,800 feet
Clearance below 195 feet History
Opened July 1, 1940
Collapsed November 7, 1940
Tacoma Narrows Bridge is located in Washington (state)

The 1940 Tacoma Narrows Bridge, the first Tacoma Narrows Bridge, was a suspension bridge in the U.S. state of Washington that spanned the Tacoma Narrows strait of Puget Sound between Tacoma and the Kitsap Peninsula. It opened to traffic on July 1, 1940, and dramatically collapsed into Puget Sound on November 7 of the same year. At the time of its construction (and its destruction), the bridge was the third-longest suspension bridge in the world in terms of main span length, behind the Golden Gate Bridge and the George Washington Bridge.

Construction on the bridge began in September 1938. From the time the deck was built, it began to move vertically in windy conditions, which led to construction workers giving the bridge the nickname Galloping Gertie. The motion was observed even when the bridge opened to the public. Several measures aimed at stopping the motion were ineffective, and the bridge's main span finally collapsed under 40-mile-per-hour wind conditions the morning of November 7, 1940.

Following the collapse, the United States' involvement in World War II delayed plans to replace the bridge. The portions of the bridge still standing after the collapse, including the towers and cables, were dismantled and sold as scrap metal. Nearly 10 years after the collapse, a new Tacoma Narrows Bridge opened in the same location, using the original bridge's tower pedestals and cable anchorages. The portion of the bridge that fell into the water now serves as an artificial reef.
he bridge's collapse had a lasting effect on science and engineering. In many physics textbooks, the event is presented as an example of elementary forced resonance; the bridge collapsed because normal speed winds produced aeroelastic flutter that matched the bridge's natural frequency. The collapse boosted research into bridge aerodynamics-aeroelastics, which has influenced the designs of all later long-span bridges.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#737 Post by nrobertb » Sat Oct 13, 2018 3:11 pm

Saint Anthony Falls or the Falls of Saint Anthony, located northeast of downtown Minneapolis, Minnesota, was the only natural major waterfall on the Upper Mississippi River. The natural falls were replaced by a concrete overflow spillway (also called an "apron") after it partially collapsed in 1869. Later, in the 1950s and 1960s, a series of locks and dams was constructed to extend navigation to points upstream.

Named after the Catholic saint Anthony of Padua, the falls is the birthplace of the former city of St. Anthony and to Minneapolis when the two cities joined in 1872 to fully use its economic power for milling operations. From 1880 to about 1930, Minneapolis was the "Flour Milling Capital of the World".

Today, the falls are defined by the locks and dams of the Upper Saint Anthony Falls, just downstream of the 3rd Avenue Bridge, and the Lower Saint Anthony Falls, just upstream of the I-35W Saint Anthony Falls Bridge. These locks were built as part of the Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Navigation Project. The area around the falls is designated the St. Anthony Falls Historic District and features a 1.8-mile self-guided walking trail with signs explaining the area's past.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#738 Post by nrobertb » Sun Oct 14, 2018 12:14 pm

Trees of Mystery is a tourist attraction near the coastal town of Klamath, California. It features many Giant Redwoods and a number of unusual tree formations, many of which can be seen from its Trail of Mysterious Trees. Its Trail of Tall Tales displays some 50 chainsaw sculptures and carvings illustrating stories of legendary logger Paul Bunyan and his crew.

Owned and operated by the same family for 67 years, Trees of Mystery is best known for its 49-foot statue of Paul Bunyan and 35-foot statue of Bunyan's companion Babe the Blue Ox, which are visible from US Highway 101. Constructed largely of wooden beams, chicken wire and stucco, the current Babe was built in 1950 and the current Bunyan in 1961. The original Bunyan was built in 1946 but was destroyed by rain that winter. In late 2007, the half-ton, nine-foot-wide head of Babe fell to the ground as the result of rain damage; it has since been replaced.

Some historians believe Bunyan was based on the French-Canadian logger Fabian "Joe" Fournier. Bunyan was originally portrayed as a hardworking American logger of large but normal proportions. As his popularity grew, so did his stature, until he was eventually portrayed as standing at treetop height.

In addition to its trails with views of unusual tree formations, Trees of Mystery features its The End of the Trail Museum with a large private collection of Native American art, crafts and tools; and a large gift shop with souvenirs, many of them handmade, reminiscent of Pacific Northwest's colorful logging history.

In 2001 an aerial tramway was installed called the Skytrail. It takes guests on a 1/3-mile ride through the forest, allowing them to see parts of the attraction from a different point of view.[5] It culminates at an observation deck where the Pacific Ocean is visible above the surrounding forest.[6]

Trees of Mystery highlights a selection of novel tree formations, including: The Cathedral Tree, consisting of nine trees growing in a semicircle out of one root structure, often used as a site for weddings
The Brotherhood Tree, so named for its massive size of 19 feet in diameter and 297 feet in height
The Candelabra Tree, formed by a fallen tree with younger trees sprouting from it
The Elephant Tree, resembling an elephant's trunk, with multiple limbs branching from its base
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#739 Post by nrobertb » Sun Oct 14, 2018 1:50 pm

Here Come the Brides is an American comedy Western series from Screen Gems that aired on the ABC television network from September 25, 1968 to April 3, 1970. The series was loosely based upon the Mercer Girls project, Asa Mercer's efforts to bring civilization to old Seattle in the 1860s by importing marriageable women from the east coast cities of the United States, where the ravages of the American Civil War left those towns short of men.

The producers said the show was inspired by the movie Seven Brides for Seven Brothers in an interview with LA Times TV critic Cecil Smith.

As a television western, set shortly after the end of the Civil War, the series rarely featured any form of gunplay, and violence was generally limited to comical fistfights. This was in keeping with the restrictions on television violence at the time. Stories highlighted the importance of cooperation, inter-racial harmony, and peaceful resolution of conflict. Plots were usually a mix of drama and humor. Being one of the first shows targeted at young women, most of the humor was at the expense of the men, but not particularly bitingly so.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#740 Post by nrobertb » Mon Oct 15, 2018 9:43 am

Another pair by Oscar Crockett.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#741 Post by nrobertb » Tue Oct 16, 2018 2:39 pm

It must have been a romantic fellow who owned these spurs by Pascal Kelly.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#742 Post by nrobertb » Wed Oct 17, 2018 3:22 pm

Sitting Bull Falls lies in a canyon in the Lincoln National Forest southwest of the city of Carlsbad, New Mexico. The United States Department of Agriculture's Forest Service maintains a popular recreation area for day use at the location of the falls.

The falls are fed by springs located in the canyon above. The water flows through a series of streams and pools until reaching the falls where it drops 150 feet into the canyon below. Most of the water disappears into the gravel or cracks in the rocks and either reappears in springs further down the canyon or joins the Pecos Valley underground water supply.

The area around Sitting Bull Falls is the remnant of a reef system known as the Capitan Great Barrier Reef dating from the Permian period. Approximately 250 million years ago, the region was located near the edge of an inland sea.

The origin of the name Sitting Bull Falls remains uncertain. One version holds that the falls were named after a Sioux medicine man. The Apache name for the area was gostahanagunti which means hidden gulch.

A number of hiking trails allow visitors access to the springs above the falls. A paved path connects the picnic area to the area around the bottom of the falls where wading and swimming are allowed. Additionally, there are a number of caves in the area which require special permits to visit.

In 1940, the Civilian Conservation Corps constructed a number of stone buildings which are part of the parking and picnic area. A time capsule located in front of one of the buildings was dedicated on March 24, 1999 and will be opened on the 100th anniversary of the Civilian Conservation Corps' construction in the area. The day use area was closed from April 27, 2011 through April 6, 2012 due to damage from a wildfire in the area. A number of the shelters were repaired after fire had damaged them. Some signs of the fire can still be seen in the area.
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