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Spurs and the Great West

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indy1919a4
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#691 Post by indy1919a4 » Tue Sep 04, 2018 3:18 pm

For all the infamy of Doc Holliday he only killed 2 men in his gun slinging days and that includes Tom McLaury shot down in that alley down from the OK Corral.

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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#692 Post by nrobertb » Tue Sep 04, 2018 6:22 pm

The Waco Mammoth National Monument is a paleontological site and museum in Waco, Texas, United States where fossils of 24 Columbian mammoths (Mammuthus columbi) and other mammals from the Pleistocene Epoch have been uncovered. The site is the largest known concentration of mammoths dying from a (possibly) reoccurring event, which is believed to have been a flash flood. The mammoths on site did not all die at the same time but rather during three separate events in the same area. A local partnership developed around the site after the initial bone was discovered.

Columbian mammoths lived 10,000 to 1 million years ago. They migrated to North America and as far south as Nicaragua. The Columbian mammoth was a herbivore, with a diet consisting of varied plant life ranging from grasses to conifers. At this time, the Central Texas landscape consisted of temperate grasslands and savannahs surrounded by river floodplains.

How the animals at the site died is unknown, but there is no evidence that humans were involved. The current theory is that approximately 68,000 years ago, at least 19 mammoths from a nursery herd were trapped in a steep-sided channel during a flash flood and drowned and/or were buried by mud. A camel was also trapped and killed during this event. Later floods buried the remains. A second event took place sometime later. During this event, an unidentified animal associated with a juvenile saber-toothed cat (genus Smilodon) died and was buried. The third event claimed the lives of a bull mammoth, two juvenile mammoths, and an adult female. Approximately 15,000 years after the nursery herd was trapped, these animals also appear to have been victims of rising water, unable to escape due to the slippery slopes of the surrounding channel.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#693 Post by nrobertb » Wed Sep 05, 2018 1:43 pm

The Dakotas ran on TV from 1962-63.
Marshal Ragan and his Deputies maintain the peace in the Badlands of the Dakota Territory.
Larry Ward, Jack Elam, and Chad Everett starred.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#694 Post by nrobertb » Wed Sep 05, 2018 8:18 pm

An Oscar Crockett spur.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#695 Post by nrobertb » Thu Sep 06, 2018 12:42 pm

Evans Plunge - Hot Springs, SD
For thousands of years, the valley of healing waters, called "wiwila kata" by the Lakota (meaning warm waters), was prized for the warm spring-fed river. Both the Lakota and Cheyenne utilized the natural river of warm water springs that flows through present-day Hot Springs.

In 1881 the spring was held by Joe Brimdschmidt. He traded the spring to Joe Petty for a horse valued at thirty-five dollars! Petty then sold the Plunge Springs to Dr. Stewart who filed on the surrounding land.

Finally, Evans Plunge (named after its builder Fred Evans), was built in 1890 over the numerous small, sparkling springs and one mammoth spring of mineral water. Originally, Evans Plunge and the other mineral baths in Hot Springs were sought as a cure-all for a multitude of illnesses.

The largest spring, at the north end of the pool in the interior of the Plunge, is known as the "Original Indian Spring." Here Native Americans drank and bathed in the spring's warm healing water. Today, numerous areas of warm sparkling springs may be felt as one moves through the crystal clear water towards the original Indian Spring.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#696 Post by nrobertb » Thu Sep 06, 2018 6:41 pm

I'll be leaving on vacation tomorrow so won't be posting for two weeks.

Cimarron Strip ran on TV from 1967-68. The western adventures of tough, but fair, Marshal Jim Crown.

Stuart Whitman, Percy Herbert, and Randy Boone starred.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#697 Post by indy1919a4 » Thu Sep 13, 2018 12:34 pm

In looking at traveling to the West I know one must be alert for Snakes and Bears..
So dug out an old Colt ad for what to bring for a Bear..
This ad is from the 1910s.. Hell of an ad..
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#698 Post by nrobertb » Fri Sep 21, 2018 9:54 pm

I'm back after 2 weeks out west. We passed this site going and coming.

The Archway (also known as The Great Platte River Road Archway or Kearney Arch) is a museum of and monument to Nebraska's and the Platte River valley's role in westward expansion. The Archway is directly over Interstate 80 three miles east of Kearney, Nebraska.

The Archway spans more than 300 feet over Interstate 80 east of Kearney, Nebraska and weighs nearly 1,500 tons. The Archway takes visitors along the trails, rails, highways and superhighways in a self-guided audio tour that includes stories of the travelers along the way. The show starts in the 1840s with the Mormon Trail, Oregon Trail and California Trail that converged at the nearby Fort Kearny before heading west. As visitors progress through the exhibit, the displays of different time periods feature a buffalo stampede, the Mormon Handcart Expedition, gold seekers, the Pony Express, the telegraph, the transcontinental railroad, the Lincoln Highway, a drive-in movie and a 1950s cafe A new exit immediately east of The Archway provides easy access. Exit 272 (to Kearney) also provides access to The Archway.

A monument and tourist attraction highlighting the Platte River valley was a goal of former Governor Frank B. Morrison. In 1997, $60 million in bonds were issued and purchased by investors. On 16 July 2000, the Archway opened to the public, with 223,013 and 249,174 visitors in the attraction's first two years, respectively.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#699 Post by nrobertb » Sat Sep 22, 2018 9:34 pm

Zia Pueblo is a census-designated place in Sandoval County, New Mexico, United States. The population was 646 at the 2000 census; Male: 310 Female: 336. The pueblo is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Zia Pueblo is part of the Albuquerque Metropolitan Statistical Area.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#700 Post by nrobertb » Sun Sep 23, 2018 10:44 am

Near Lee's Ferry and the Navajo Bridge over the Colorado River is an odd little place called Cliff Dwellers.

The story of Cliff Dwellers begins during the Great Depression, when Blanche Russell gave up a highly successful dancing career back East to tend to her husband, Bill, who was suffering from tuberculosis. The couple packed up and moved to the Southwest, crossing the recently completed Navajo Bridge across the Colorado River south of Lees Ferry about 1927.

The Russells only made it a few more miles, however, before their car broke down near the big rocks. Blanche got it in her head that it wouldn't be a half-bad place to live and the couple threw up a lean-to of tarpaper and boards against the largest rock. Then, she started serving food to passers-by in return for labor as the house got larger.

Pretty soon, the couple had a full-scale restaurant on their hands and added a hand gasoline pump for some of the earliest motorists to the Canyon's North Rim. They also catered to members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in wagons who were taking the Mormons' nearby Honeymoon Trail to have their marriages sanctified at the temple in St. George, Utah.

Today beside the old ruins are a restaurant, motel and gas station.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#701 Post by nrobertb » Sun Sep 23, 2018 6:40 pm

The beautiful Grand Canyon Lodge at the North Rim was built by architect Gilbert Stanley Underwood and was finished in 1928. Native stone and timber were used to make the lodge with much of the main lodge featuring Kaibab limestone that makes up the cliff at Bright Angel Point. Underwood built 120 cabins surrounding the main lodge then later added 20 more in 1928. The lodge was initially run by the Utah Parks Company, who was also a National Park Concessioner in Zion and Bryce Canyon National Parks.

As the lodge flourished when it was initially opened, a devastating fire the began in the lodge’s basement which nearly destroyed all of the main lodge and two cabins. In spite of this setback, in 1936 the lodge began being rebuilt. While the original stonework was reused, the lodge was scaled back to ensure it could withstand a strong winter snow that comes to the North Rim. For this reason, the original second story observation tower was not rebuilt however the main Dining Room and Recreation rooms were reconstructed with higher roofs.

The lodge has been in operation since it reopened in 1936. It officially earned designation as a National Historic Landmark on May 28, 1987, forever cementing its place in American History.

It is different from other big lodges in that there are no bedrooms attached to it. There are 440 rooms in outlying duplex cabins and larger buildings.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#702 Post by nrobertb » Mon Sep 24, 2018 12:59 pm

Custer ran on TV in 1967. In 1868, after the Civil War, Custer takes charge of a mix of ex-Confederates and criminals, the 7th Cavalry Regiment at Fort Hays, Kansas. His boss General Terry doesn't like his methods or his long blond hair, but he manages to keep fighting the Sioux (the series ends the year before the Little Big Horn).

Wayne Maunder, Slim Pickens, and Robert F. Simon starred.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#703 Post by nrobertb » Tue Sep 25, 2018 10:02 am

The Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad (C&TS) is a 3 ft narrow-gauge heritage railroad running for 64 miles between Antonito, Colorado and Chama, New Mexico, United States. The railroad gets its name from two geographical features along the route, the 10,015 ft high Cumbres Pass and Toltec Gorge. Originally part of the Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad's narrow-gauge network, the line has been jointly owned by the states of Colorado and New Mexico since 1970.

The rail line over which the Cumbres & Toltec operates was constructed in 1881 by the Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad (D&RGW) as part of their San Juan extension stretching from Alamosa, Colorado to Durango, Colorado. The line was originally built to support mining operations in the San Juan Mountains, mainly around Durango and Silverton. By the mid 20th century, the ore traffic had dwindled but the line continued to support various agricultural and industrial operations until the 1960s.

In 1968, freight traffic was virtually gone and the railroad began the process of abandoning the line. However, the states of Colorado and New Mexico purchased the 64 mile portion between Antonito and Chama in 1970 and began excursion services on the route as the Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad.

The Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad operates between late May and late October with two trains (one in each direction) departing each morning from Antonito and Chama. Both trains are timed to meet at Osier, an old section town located about halfway along the route, for a lunch stop. Afterwards, passengers continue with their train to its destination or switch trains to return to their original terminal. Through riders are returned to their starting place by motorcoach after the train arrives at its destination.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#704 Post by nrobertb » Tue Sep 25, 2018 9:52 pm

Destry ran on TV in 1964. Young Harrison Destry, son of legendary lawman Tom Destry, had been a sheriff himself until he was framed and sent to prison. Now he roams about looking for the hombres that did him wrong. He's not the typical foolhardy hero, though, which made this Western series also comedic.

John Gavin, Ken Mayer, Bill Coontz starred.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#705 Post by nrobertb » Wed Sep 26, 2018 7:36 pm

The Georgetown Loop Railroad is a 3 ft narrow gauge United States heritage railroad located in the Rocky Mountains in Clear Creek County, adjacent to Interstate 70 in Colorado.

This tourist train runs between the communities of Georgetown and Silver Plume, a distance of 2 miles. The route is 4.5 miles long and ascends an elevation of 640 feet through mountainous terrain along with trestles, cuts, fills, and a grand loop.

The railroad is situated near I-70, with Silver Plume Depot sitting adjacent to the eastbound on-ramp. Just east of Silver Plume on I-70 there is a parking area named Georgetown Loop Overlook providing scenic views to motorists. The Clear Creek Greenway Trail access road connects Silver Plume Depot, Georgetown Loop Overlook, and the Devil's Gate Station near Georgetown. This trail is accessible to bicyclists and hikers.

The Georgetown Loop Railroad was one of Colorado’s first visitor attractions. This spectacular stretch of 3 ft (914 mm) narrow gauge railroad was completed in 1884 and considered an engineering marvel for its time. The thriving mining towns of Georgetown and Silver Plume lie 2 miles apart in the steep, narrow canyon of Clear Creek in the Rocky Mountains west of Denver. Engineers designed a corkscrew route that traveled nearly twice that distance to connect them, slowly gaining more than 600 feet in elevation. The route included horseshoe curves, grades of up to 4%, and four bridges across Clear Creek, including the massive Devil’s Gate High Bridge.

The Georgetown, Breckenridge, and Leadville Railroad had been formed in 1881 under the Union Pacific Railroad. The Loop portion of the line was the crowning segment of the line, crossing the top of the gorge on a 95-foot high trestle.

Originally part of the larger line of the Colorado Central Railroad constructed in the 1870s and 1880s, in the wake of the Colorado Gold Rush, this line was also used extensively during the silver boom of the 1880s to haul silver ore from the mines at Silver Plume. In 1893, the Colorado and Southern Railway took over the line and operated it for passengers and freight until 1938.

Between 1906 and 1918, the Georgetown Loop connected with the Argentine Central Railway in Silver Plume, by which tourists could continue onward to the summit of Mount McClellan. Prior to 1916, the Argentine Central also served several large silver mines on the east side of Argentine Pass.

The line was dismantled in 1939, but was restored in the 1980s to operate during summer months as a tourist railroad, carrying passengers using historic 3 ft narrow gauge steam locomotives.

In 1959, the centennial year of the discovery of gold in Georgetown, the Georgetown Loop Historic Mining & Railroad Park was formed by the Colorado Historical Society. The Colorado Historical Society’s chairman negotiated a donation of mining claims and mills, and nearly 100 acres of land.

Interest in restoration of the Loop segment as a tourist attraction in the 1970s led to reopening of the segment. Rail line construction began in 1973 with track and ties donated by the Union Pacific Railroad, and a new high bridge was built. The 3-mile restored segment, opened on March 10, 1984, is at the upper end of the historic Colorado Central main line up Clear Creek Canyon west of Golden. The Georgetown Loop Railroad climbs approximately 640 feet between the two towns using 3 miles of track. Passengers can board the train at depots located in Silver Plume and Devils Gate 3/4 of a mile west of Georgetown.

The train ride includes an optional walking tour of the Lebanon Silver Mine, located at the halfway point on the railroad, where visitors can walk 500 feet into a mine tunnel bored in the 1870s, with guides pointing out once-rich veins of silver and relating the history of the mine.
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