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Spurs and the Great West

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indy1919a4
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#691 Post by indy1919a4 » Tue Sep 04, 2018 3:18 pm

For all the infamy of Doc Holliday he only killed 2 men in his gun slinging days and that includes Tom McLaury shot down in that alley down from the OK Corral.

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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#692 Post by nrobertb » Tue Sep 04, 2018 6:22 pm

The Waco Mammoth National Monument is a paleontological site and museum in Waco, Texas, United States where fossils of 24 Columbian mammoths (Mammuthus columbi) and other mammals from the Pleistocene Epoch have been uncovered. The site is the largest known concentration of mammoths dying from a (possibly) reoccurring event, which is believed to have been a flash flood. The mammoths on site did not all die at the same time but rather during three separate events in the same area. A local partnership developed around the site after the initial bone was discovered.

Columbian mammoths lived 10,000 to 1 million years ago. They migrated to North America and as far south as Nicaragua. The Columbian mammoth was a herbivore, with a diet consisting of varied plant life ranging from grasses to conifers. At this time, the Central Texas landscape consisted of temperate grasslands and savannahs surrounded by river floodplains.

How the animals at the site died is unknown, but there is no evidence that humans were involved. The current theory is that approximately 68,000 years ago, at least 19 mammoths from a nursery herd were trapped in a steep-sided channel during a flash flood and drowned and/or were buried by mud. A camel was also trapped and killed during this event. Later floods buried the remains. A second event took place sometime later. During this event, an unidentified animal associated with a juvenile saber-toothed cat (genus Smilodon) died and was buried. The third event claimed the lives of a bull mammoth, two juvenile mammoths, and an adult female. Approximately 15,000 years after the nursery herd was trapped, these animals also appear to have been victims of rising water, unable to escape due to the slippery slopes of the surrounding channel.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#693 Post by nrobertb » Wed Sep 05, 2018 1:43 pm

The Dakotas ran on TV from 1962-63.
Marshal Ragan and his Deputies maintain the peace in the Badlands of the Dakota Territory.
Larry Ward, Jack Elam, and Chad Everett starred.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#694 Post by nrobertb » Wed Sep 05, 2018 8:18 pm

An Oscar Crockett spur.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#695 Post by nrobertb » Thu Sep 06, 2018 12:42 pm

Evans Plunge - Hot Springs, SD
For thousands of years, the valley of healing waters, called "wiwila kata" by the Lakota (meaning warm waters), was prized for the warm spring-fed river. Both the Lakota and Cheyenne utilized the natural river of warm water springs that flows through present-day Hot Springs.

In 1881 the spring was held by Joe Brimdschmidt. He traded the spring to Joe Petty for a horse valued at thirty-five dollars! Petty then sold the Plunge Springs to Dr. Stewart who filed on the surrounding land. Mineral springs sought as a cure-all.

Finally, Evans Plunge (named after its builder Fred Evans), was built in 1890 over the numerous small, sparkling springs and one mammoth spring of mineral water. Originally, Evans Plunge and the other mineral baths in Hot Springs were sought as a cure-all for a multitude of illnesses.

"They [the springs] were the resort of the Indians long before the white man found his way into the jealously guarded realms of the Black Hills, and were considered by the red man as a panacea for all ills. This water has been found useful in the treatment of chronic diseases of the gastro-intestinal tract, diseases of the liver and biliary passages, and in rheumatism and arthritic joint disturbances, gout, and others." —Mineral Water in the United States by Dr. W.E. Fitch.
The largest spring, at the north end of the pool in the interior of the Plunge, is known as the "Original Indian Spring." Here Native Americans drank and bathed in the spring's warm healing water. Today, numerous areas of warm sparkling springs may be felt as one moves through the crystal clear water towards the original Indian Spring.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#696 Post by nrobertb » Thu Sep 06, 2018 6:41 pm

I'll be leaving on vacation tomorrow so won't be posting for two weeks.

Cimarron Strip ran on TV from 1967-68. The western adventures of tough, but fair, Marshal Jim Crown.

Stuart Whitman, Percy Herbert, and Randy Boone starred.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#697 Post by indy1919a4 » Thu Sep 13, 2018 12:34 pm

In looking at traveling to the West I know one must be alert for Snakes and Bears..
So dug out an old Colt ad for what to bring for a Bear..
This ad is from the 1910s.. Hell of an ad..
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