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Spurs and the Great West

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ffuries
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#571 Post by ffuries » Fri Jul 13, 2018 9:46 pm

indy1919a4 wrote:
Fri Jul 13, 2018 9:03 pm
ffuries wrote:
Fri Jul 13, 2018 5:56 pm
The one holding the pole and reaching for the whisky bottle appears to be white.
You know I thought that also, Alone with the man in upper row on the left with the strip on his arm, and Mr Pan holder...

Now that rascal with the pan must have loved his fatback ...
I agree with you there, either that or my eyes are getting worse.
Mike
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Jan 86 - Sept 08
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(122X0, 1T1X1, 1P0X1)
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#572 Post by nrobertb » Fri Jul 13, 2018 10:28 pm

Here's another buffalo soldier of the 9th cavalry, 1890. Notice the long legged high backed horse, as I have commented on before.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#573 Post by indy1919a4 » Fri Jul 13, 2018 11:50 pm

nrobertb wrote:
Fri Jul 13, 2018 10:28 pm
Here's another buffalo soldier of the 9th cavalry, 1890. Notice the long legged high backed horse, as I have commented on before.
You know this has the same issue of the 1st photo.. There looks to be snow on the ground, yet this guy is just in his shirt... Must not be that cold..

But there looks to be a wind on that horses mane.. Those shirts must be thicker then they look. Or those guys were tougher

This will help alittle ID ing those chevrons...

http://www.ushist.com/indian_wars/us_mi ... d_iw.shtml

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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#574 Post by nrobertb » Sat Jul 14, 2018 8:36 am

The Laguna Pueblo is a federally recognized tribe of Native American Pueblo people in west-central New Mexico, USA. The name, Laguna, is Spanish (meaning "small lake") and derives from the lake located on their reservation. Originally, this body of water was the only lake in what is now the state of New Mexico, and was formed by an ancient dam that was constructed by the Laguna people. After the Pueblo Revolt of 1680-1696, the Mission San José de la Laguna was erected by the Spanish at the old pueblo (now Old Laguna), and finished around July 4, 1699.

The people of Laguna have a long history of residing in and farming along the Rio San José in west-central New Mexico. Laguna history begins long before the advent of written records in the Southwest. It is a common misconception that the Pueblo of Laguna began in 1699, at the time of the construction of the Mission. However, research of 1,449 archaeological sites and an anthropological analysis of the Laguna oral history have firmly proven that people have inhabited the area ranging from 6500 B.C. to the present.

The Acoma Pueblo and Pueblo of Laguna have many ties, including location, language and a shared high school.

The Irish surname Riley was adopted by many members of the Laguna tribe in the 1800s, for legal use in European-American culture, while they retained their Laguna names for tribal use.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#575 Post by nrobertb » Sat Jul 14, 2018 1:59 pm

Casey Jones ran on TV in 1957-58, starring Alan Hale Jr. The son of the great character actor (and Errol Flynn sidekick) Alan Hale, Alan Hale Jr. was literally born into the movies. Hale did his first movie as a baby and continued to act until his death. Unlike other child actors, Hale made a smooth transition in the movies and starred in several classics like Up Periscope (1959), The Lady Takes a Flyer (1958) and The West Point Story (1950), as well as many westerns. He did a lot of television guest appearances as well before getting his role as The Skipper on the cult comedy Gilligan's Island (1964). After the show went off the air, Hale continued to act and even teamed up with Gilligan co-star Bob Denver in the The Good Guys (1968).

Television version of the classic train story of Casey Jones, the engineer of the steam-engine powered "Cannonball Express".
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#576 Post by indy1919a4 » Sat Jul 14, 2018 3:59 pm

Alan hale Jr was one of those greats of hollywood.. He had a talent and then used it till the
end to bring happiness.. and alot of what he gave was off the screen..

https://www.neatorama.com/2017/08/16/Al ... e-Skipper/

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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#577 Post by nrobertb » Sat Jul 14, 2018 11:15 pm

Cochiti is a census-designated place in Sandoval County, New Mexico, United States. A historic pueblo of the Cochiti people, it is part of the Albuquerque Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 528 at the 2010 census.

Located 22 miles southwest of Santa Fe, the community is listed as a historic district on the National Register of Historic Places. The Cochiti pueblo people are a federally recognized tribe of Native Americans.

Potters of Cochiti and Tewa (formerly Santo Domingo) have made traditional pots for centuries, developing styles for different purposes and expressing deep beliefs in their designs. Since the early decades of the 20th century, these pots have been appreciated by a wider audience outside the pueblos. Continuing to use traditional techniques, in the late 20th and early 21st centuries, potters have also expanded their designs and repertoire in pottery, which has an international market.

The Cochiti speak Keres, an eastern Keresan language, which is a language isolate. The pueblo celebrates the annual feast day for its patron saint, San Buenaventura, on July 1
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#578 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jul 15, 2018 9:18 am

Here's a pair of Blanchard spurs.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#579 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jul 15, 2018 5:54 pm

Hopalong Cassidy ran on TV from 1952-54 and was a carer defining role for William Boyd, who had previously done a lot of movies, which included the Hopalong character. I always thought that his westerns were very well written.

In 1935 he was offered the lead role in Hop-a-Long Cassidy (1935) (named because of a limp caused by an earlier bullet wound). He changed the original pulp-fiction character to its opposite, made sure that "Hoppy" didn't smoke, drink, chew tobacco or swear, rarely kissed a girl and let the bad guy draw first. By 1943 he had made 54 "Hoppies" for his original producer, Harry Sherman; after Sherman dropped the series, Boyd produced and starred in 12 more on his own. The series was wildly popular, and all recouped at least double their production costs. In 1948 Boyd, in a savvy and precedent-setting move, bought the rights to all his pictures (he had to sell his ranch to raise the money) just as TV was looking for Saturday morning Western fare. He marketed all sorts of "Hoppy" products (lunch boxes, toy guns, cowboy hats, etc.) and received royalties from comic books, radio and records. He retired to Palm Desert, California, in 1953.

Hopalong and his horse Topper catch bad guys with Red Connors for comic relief.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#580 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jul 15, 2018 11:06 pm

Oraibi, also referred to as Old Oraibi, is a Hopi village in Navajo County, Arizona, United States, in the northeastern part of the state. Known as Orayvi by the native inhabitants, it is located on Third Mesa on the Hopi Reservation near Kykotsmovi Village. There are no accurate census counts or estimates for the village population.

Oraibi was founded sometime before the year 1100 CE, making it one of the oldest continuously inhabited settlements within the United States. Archeologists speculate that a series of severe droughts in the late 13th century forced the Hopi to abandon several smaller villages in the region and consolidate within a few population centers. As Oraibi was one of these surviving settlements its population grew considerably, and became populous and the most influential of the Hopi settlements. By 1890 the village was estimated to have a population of 905, almost half of the 1,824 estimated to be living in all of the Hopi settlements at the time.

Oraibi remained unknown to European explorers until about 1540 when Spanish explorer Don Pedro de Tovar (who was part of the Coronado expedition) encountered the Hopi while searching for the legendary Seven Cities of Gold. Contact with the Europeans remained scant until 1629 when the San Francisco mission was established in the village. In 1680 the Pueblo Revolt resulted in decreased Spanish influence in the area and the cessation of the mission. Subsequent attempts to reestablish the missions in Hopi villages were met with repeated failures. The former mission is still visible today as a ruin.

The villagers value their privacy. No photographs are allowed so there are no recent views of the village.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#581 Post by nrobertb » Mon Jul 16, 2018 11:19 am

Back in the day, every small town had a blacksmith shop to do repair work or make new items on request. Some blacksmiths shoed horses, others didn't. Lots of western movies and TV shows have a brief scene of the village smith, usually banging on the anvil as the stranger rides into town. There has also been a lot of nonsense perpetrated, such as the guy who builds a campfire to forge steel. Wood burns at around 600 degrees fahrenheit, far too low to work even mild steel. Charcoal, however, can exceed 2.000 degrees.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#582 Post by nrobertb » Mon Jul 16, 2018 3:22 pm

One item in every blacksmith shop was the leg vise. The leg extends into a hole in the floor or a block of wood. This transfers the shock of hammering downwards so you don't break the jaws off the vise.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#583 Post by nrobertb » Mon Jul 16, 2018 3:46 pm

If you love things western, I strongly recommend Gary McMahan's 2016 film "Everything In the Song Is True".

Four iconic cowboys whose music, art and way of life sustain vital connection to the folk culture that defines the American frontier. As modern life continues to encroach on the wide open spaces, their stories take on a new relevance. Their songs and deeds speak to a powerful connection to the land, the animals and a way of life that is unique to the United States and revered around the world.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#584 Post by nrobertb » Mon Jul 16, 2018 11:35 pm

Here is another Remington painting, titled "His First Lesson". Notice the slick fork, high cantle saddle.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#585 Post by nrobertb » Tue Jul 17, 2018 9:23 am

Every blacksmith shop had a cone or mandrel, which was used for making rings or circles. If you needed a new ring for your logging chain, just heat a piece of rod in the forge, bend it around the mandrel, overlap the ends and hammer weld them together.
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