Yugoslavian M 57 Tokarev Pistol Crests A-P

Yugo, Romanian etc.
72 usmc
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Re: Yugoslavian M 57 Tokarev Pistol Crests A-P

Post by 72 usmc »

Three More pics of examples of the military Yugo magazine with markings:
Screen Shot 2020-06-17 at 12.22.41 PM.png
Screen Shot 2020-06-17 at 12.22.41 PM.png (235.81 KiB) Viewed 270 times
Screen Shot 2020-06-17 at 12.25.53 PM.png
Screen Shot 2020-06-17 at 12.33.05 PM.png
Last edited by 72 usmc on Wed Jun 17, 2020 1:34 pm, edited 2 times in total.
To old to fight and to old to run, a Jar head will just shoot and be done with you.

72 usmc
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Re: Yugoslavian M 57 Tokarev Pistol Crests A-P

Post by 72 usmc »

It seems Classic may have found more of the Glock like trigger Yugo toks????
Screen Shot 2020-06-17 at 12.10.14 PM.png


link https://www.classicfirearms.com/yugo-tt ... rplus-9rd/

so sweet.
hgn-yugo-ttc-m57-ts_1_web-compressor_1.png
hgn-yugo-ttc-m57-ts_2_web-compressor_1.png
Last edited by 72 usmc on Wed Jun 17, 2020 1:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.
To old to fight and to old to run, a Jar head will just shoot and be done with you.

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Re: Yugoslavian M 57 Tokarev Pistol Crests A-P

Post by vmog23 »

Hi everyone I'm new here and I just jumped on a M57 but I'm trying to gauge a the year it would have been made. It has the C prefix but it is stamped with 97 under the retaining clip and has no crest on the slide. I have attached a few pictures and any help would be appreciated. ImageImageImage

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Re: Yugoslavian M 57 Tokarev Pistol Crests A-P

Post by luigi »

I have had this M57 for a while w/ a F196XXX S/N. I believe it is 1963 birth year.
It has the "crappy" add-on safety. It has a nice feel and shoots very well.
Attachments
2JpCplU.jpg
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72 usmc
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Re: Yugoslavian M 57 Tokarev Pistol Crests A-P

Post by 72 usmc »

Hi everyone I'm new here and I just jumped on a M57 but I'm trying to gauge a the year it would have been made. It has the C prefix but it is stamped with 97 under the retaining clip and has no crest on the slide.

Not a 1965, military used Tok. More recent and a great shooter due to a mint barrel.The only better ones are the former military ones with the GlocK trigger safety that can be converted back to no safety.
Your sterile slide, M57 is a 1997 date. It has a 1990s C serial with civilian marked parts. see page 4 about the middle of the page. These generally are like new condition. See the lower link in the quote from page 4 :
Re: Yugoslavian M 57 Tokarev Pistol Crests A-P
Edit Report Quote
Post by 72 usmc » Thu Mar 28, 2019 8:54 am

Looks like a M75 A Yugo civilian model with non military grips that have the later Zastava-Arms Company marked grips. You see the a large C and smaller Z inside a circle trade mark of the Zastava company with a production date of 93 for 1993. The M75 A came in original 7.62x25 while a similar looking model the M70A came in 9mm. Magazines may be sterile- no markings lacking a electro number and base loop. There may be a small electro inscribed Z on parts and some had a small electro inscribed circle with a C and z trade mark at the base of the pistol. These pistols had the military features removed: Mag loop, lanyard loop on the pistol, no Yugo crest, and non military, unnumbered matching magazines. This is a newer, non military version to sell. Generally these are mint, NIB, never used pistols. They have a C serial number & no crest. Some came chromed- the Zastava factory adapted so they could sell as many as possible to make money. see this link : http://www.surplusrifleforum.com/viewto ... 3&start=15

They are always changing the safety and markings as time goes on. I think 92/93 was a change over former military production to civilian production- so a lot of odd ball attributes are observed. It should be a nice pistol to fire. What do the inside markings on the parts look like. Be sure to clean the little guy- some have cosmo goo inside the firing pin chamber which is a dog to take down without parts jumping all over. Look for filings and rough machining on these-safety may hang up and need a little polish. Trigger will be gritty, with a hard pull also needs some polishing of the assy. Grips may have plastic shavings under the edges. Lub the trigger assy inside and safety mech. It depends on who made it, some are machined very nicely like the military pistols, others look like a drunk made them showing lots of milling marks. Yours seems to have a nice finish and it may be the same on the inside milling details. Yours has the newer barrel stamp and the 93 date.

:arrow: Your is similar to mine dated 92 that I got from Todd at family and is shown in detail on pages 2-3. Please take a look. It has more military features, but they are very similar. If possible, when you take yours down, please show the parts markings so others can see how different or similar each of our 1990s dated, non crested pistols are. Both have a C serial #. Mine still has the military grips and loop. My Trigger/hammer assy. has some rough maching like it came from a different source. It was also marked odd with a set of initials? Our exterior finish on each pistol is very well done- perfection. My frame machining is also nicely done. However, my electro penciled parts assy. number appears to have been ground off and my matching number rewritten. Like the frame number by the ejection port was done for another pistol or written down incorrectly on the first attempt. The slide to frame fit is smooth. Always grease the rails. More pictures of you pistols details would be great for others to see on such a similar example, if possible, PLEASE :pray: show how each part is marked. Thank You.
Here are the commercial markings found on post 1982 M57 commercial parts. Source is article in below link:
https://oruzjeonline.com/2018/09/30/jug ... tolju-m57/
English translation version :

https://oruzjeonline.com/2018/09/30/jug ... tolju-m57/
To old to fight and to old to run, a Jar head will just shoot and be done with you.

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Re: Yugoslavian M 57 Tokarev Pistol Crests A-P

Post by vmog23 »

72 usmc wrote:
Hi everyone I'm new here and I just jumped on a M57 but I'm trying to gauge a the year it would have been made. It has the C prefix but it is stamped with 97 under the retaining clip and has no crest on the slide.

Not a 1965, military used Tok. More recent and a great shooter due to a mint barrel.The only better ones are the former military ones with the GlocK trigger safety that can be converted back to no safety.
Your sterile slide, M57 is a 1997 date. It has a 1990s C serial with civilian marked parts. see page 4 about the middle of the page. These generally are like new condition. See the lower link in the quote from page 4 :
Re: Yugoslavian M 57 Tokarev Pistol Crests A-P
Edit Report Quote
Post by 72 usmc » Thu Mar 28, 2019 8:54 am

Looks like a M75 A Yugo civilian model with non military grips that have the later Zastava-Arms Company marked grips. You see the a large C and smaller Z inside a circle trade mark of the Zastava company with a production date of 93 for 1993. The M75 A came in original 7.62x25 while a similar looking model the M70A came in 9mm. Magazines may be sterile- no markings lacking a electro number and base loop. There may be a small electro inscribed Z on parts and some had a small electro inscribed circle with a C and z trade mark at the base of the pistol. These pistols had the military features removed: Mag loop, lanyard loop on the pistol, no Yugo crest, and non military, unnumbered matching magazines. This is a newer, non military version to sell. Generally these are mint, NIB, never used pistols. They have a C serial number & no crest. Some came chromed- the Zastava factory adapted so they could sell as many as possible to make money. see this link : http://www.surplusrifleforum.com/viewto ... 3&start=15

They are always changing the safety and markings as time goes on. I think 92/93 was a change over former military production to civilian production- so a lot of odd ball attributes are observed. It should be a nice pistol to fire. What do the inside markings on the parts look like. Be sure to clean the little guy- some have cosmo goo inside the firing pin chamber which is a dog to take down without parts jumping all over. Look for filings and rough machining on these-safety may hang up and need a little polish. Trigger will be gritty, with a hard pull also needs some polishing of the assy. Grips may have plastic shavings under the edges. Lub the trigger assy inside and safety mech. It depends on who made it, some are machined very nicely like the military pistols, others look like a drunk made them showing lots of milling marks. Yours seems to have a nice finish and it may be the same on the inside milling details. Yours has the newer barrel stamp and the 93 date.

:arrow: Your is similar to mine dated 92 that I got from Todd at family and is shown in detail on pages 2-3. Please take a look. It has more military features, but they are very similar. If possible, when you take yours down, please show the parts markings so others can see how different or similar each of our 1990s dated, non crested pistols are. Both have a C serial #. Mine still has the military grips and loop. My Trigger/hammer assy. has some rough maching like it came from a different source. It was also marked odd with a set of initials? Our exterior finish on each pistol is very well done- perfection. My frame machining is also nicely done. However, my electro penciled parts assy. number appears to have been ground off and my matching number rewritten. Like the frame number by the ejection port was done for another pistol or written down incorrectly on the first attempt. The slide to frame fit is smooth. Always grease the rails. More pictures of you pistols details would be great for others to see on such a similar example, if possible, PLEASE :pray: show how each part is marked. Thank You.
Here are the commercial markings found on post 1982 M57 commercial parts. Source is article in below link:
https://oruzjeonline.com/2018/09/30/jug ... tolju-m57/
English translation version :

https://oruzjeonline.com/2018/09/30/jug ... tolju-m57/
I had a suspicion that it was a late 90's but wanted to make sure. Now all I have to so is put some rounds through it.

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72 usmc
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Re: Yugoslavian M 57 Tokarev Pistol Crests A-P

Post by 72 usmc »

This post was saved on the Wayback Machine with links to the old version on page 1. In order to re post the photos of other members some rearranging had to be done to squeeze in the photos within my existing posts. I could not add photos to the other authors. So slight modifications were required. Restored 17 June 2020 and the new version was saved on the Wayback again.
To old to fight and to old to run, a Jar head will just shoot and be done with you.

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Re: Yugoslavian M 57 Tokarev Pistol Crests A-P

Post by 72 usmc »

POST 2012 Production Yugo Tokarev
A great web page :arrow: :arrow: https://sites.google.com/site/yugoslavi ... ial-number
M57A
* Manufacturer: ZASTAVA
* Model: M57A
* Caliber: 7.62X25 Tokarev
* Finish: BLUE
* Manufacture: SERBIA
* Serial number: Z-M57-0000690
* New production model, starting in 2012
* Year made: 2012
pix159236498-1_kindlephoto-18860713.jpg
pix159236498-1_kindlephoto-18860713.jpg (27.65 KiB) Viewed 235 times


History of the M57 & M57 A see https://sites.google.com/site/yugoslavi ... 57/history
M57a Serial number
Z-M57-0000690 Imported new into the United States 2012.

To explain a little further, the new M57A pistols began being imported in about November/December 2011, right around the time of Newtown and Obama's re-election. The new Zastava M57As have a serial number on right of the frame, below the slide and above the grips, that starts Z-M57-000XXXX. I've owned two new M57As and both had serial numbers in the 5000s.

Finally, the new M57As will have different grips with vertical lines and Zastava's "CZ" (Crvena Zastava) logo in the middle of the grip. The surplus pistols have a lanyard ring on the left of the frame and will have the Communist star and "F R S J" initials on the grips. I believe those four letters translate as Federal Socialist Republic of Yugoslavia.
From a portion of the above link "History of the M57A and M57". That link is worth a print out. Reproduced as a direct quote in case the web page goes down.
NEW M57A

The Zastava M57A is a variant of the Zastava M57, which itself is a variant of the Soviet TT-33. Zastava is a Serbian firearms company and has been in operation since the 1800s. As a side note, Zastava also manufactured the “Yugo” car.

The story of the M57A begins with the TT-33; the TT-33, also known as the Tokarev after its designer Fedor Tokarev, was the standard Soviet pistol in the 1930s, 1940s, and into the 1950s. An important aspect of the TT-33 is that it lacks an external safety. The only safety mechanism of the TT-33 is a half-cock notch for the hammer. This was not a concern for the Red Army, and this aspect was maintained in the original M57. The M57 is still produced by Zastava without a safety; however these pistols are not imported into the US because the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives does not allow pistols to be imported without some form of mechanical safety. The M57A is simply a M57 with a safety added to the slide by Zastava.

Besides the addition of a safety mechanism on the M57A, the critical difference between the TT-33 and the M57A is that the M57 has a 9+1 round capacity, and the TT-33 has an 8 round capacity. This extra cartridge was squeezed in by lengthening the grips and the magazine; the grips and magazines of the two pistols are not interchangeable because of this. There are other differences between the M57A and the TT-33; the slide serrations are narrower and therefore more plentiful on the M57A. The M57A also has a magazine safety that prevents the pistol from being fired without a magazine in the magazine well; the TT-33 does not have this either. The M57A has a larger magazine release button than the TT-33. The recoil spring and guide rod are also different between the pistols; the M57A has a full length guide rod.

The M57 was adopted by the Yugoslavian military in 1957. It continued as a standard issue pistol until 1970, when the Yugoslavs adopted the M70. The M70 shares the same design as the M57, but its caliber is 9x19, whereas the M57 and M57A are in the 7.62x25 caliber. The M57 and the M70 have been in continuous production since their adoption, and were used often during the Balkan Wars of the 1990s and early 2000s.

The M57A and its magazines are simple and straightforward to disassemble and reassemble. It can be field stripped, cleaned, oiled, and put back together in less time than it takes to read this webpage. It technically is possible to field strip a M57A without tools, however a plastic punch of some sort does come in handy to remove the retaining clip on the right side of the pistol. To completely disassemble and reassemble the pistol, a punch and screwdriver are needed. A flathead screwdriver is needed to take apart the magazines.

The M57A has been imported into the US since November of 2012. The pistols typically cost between $225 and $250 new. In comparison, a new Colt M1911 pistol typically sells for in excess of $1000, and a new Glock pistol ranges between $500 to $700, depending on the generation, model, and the dealer.

These pistols, due to their size, caliber, and price, are very multipurpose. With expanding bullets, it could be used legally in some states such as Massachusetts to hunt coyote and other small game. Although it is a large pistol in comparison to many “pocket pistols”, it is possible to carry a M57A in a concealed manner in an appropriate holster if using the appropriate hollow point bullets. The recoil of the pistol is manageable and new shooters should not be burdened by it. It can also be used for home defense, again, with expanding bullets. It is not, however, appropriate for many competitive shoots because its bore diameter is too small. Typically, most competitions require a bore diameter at or in excess of .355”, and the bore diameter of the M57A is .308”. It could be used for steel plate shooting; however caution should be used when firing at steel plates at close range with full metal jacket bullets.

The Zastava M57A is chambered in the 7.62x25 caliber. This caliber is also found in the Soviet TT-33, Romanian TTC, Polish wz. 33, Czech vz. 52, Chinese Type 51 and Type 54, and North Korean Type 68 pistols, in addition to the Soviet PPSh-41 and PPS-43 machine pistols and various other machine pistols made by countries that had adopted this cartridge.

It was introduced by the Soviets in approximately 1930 with the prototype of the TT-33, the TT-30. The cartridge is probably based upon and is interchangeable with the 7.63 Mauser cartridge. However, it must be noted that the 7.62x25 is more potent than 7.63 Mauser, and 7.62x25 ammunition should NOT be shot in firearms chambered in 7.63 Mauser due to the age of the firearms and the increased potency of 7.62x25. The relationship between the two is similar to .38 Special and .357 Magnum, however the .357 Magnum was deliberately designed to not function in firearms made in .38 Special to avoid the problem that shooting 7.62x25 in a 7.63 Mauser would cause.

When fired, the 7.62x25 bullet travels roughly at 1650 feet per second and impacts at about 500 foot pounds. In comparison, the American .45ACP “Hard Ball” military cartridge travels at about 830 feet per second and impacts around 350 foot pounds; it should be noted however, that the statistics I have given are new 7.62x25 cartridges against old .45ACP cartridges. Modern .45ACP can perform much better. However, these statistics are considered “standard” for both cartridges’ performance.

7.62x25 is noted by shooters as being one of the few pistol cartridges that can penetrate thin steel plates, armored vests that are typically rated against pistol cartridges and the US military’s Kevlar helmet. This level of penetration is presumably one of the reasons why various militaries have adopted this cartridge; however it can be a problem for the average civilian who is using a firearm in 7.62x25 in a self defense purpose. Full metal jacket 7.62x25 bullets can go clean through someone with ease unless the bullet hits bone. Therefore, hollow point bullets are normally used for people hunting with these firearms or using them for self defense. Also, hollow point bullets are designed to expand upon impact and cause further damage to body tissue. The muzzle flash from a 7.62x25 pistol is impressive to say the least, and the noise it creates does draw attention at the shooting range. However, due to the relatively small size of the bullet, recoil is easy to control for new and experienced shooters alike.

Although 7.62x25 no longer has any military applications, it is still being produced by ammunition companies such as Sellier and Bellot of the Czech Republic, Prvi Partizan of Serbia, various Russian companies, and others. Currently, Zastava is one of a handful of companies producing pistols in 7.62x25 and the only pistols being made are in the Tokarev style, such as the M57 and M57A. Currently, 7.62x25 sells at about 40 to 60 cents per shot in boxes of 50.
To old to fight and to old to run, a Jar head will just shoot and be done with you.

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