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Military Surplus k98ks commonly found at gun shows

Gew88, Gew98, Kar98 etc.
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72 usmc
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Military Surplus k98ks commonly found at gun shows

#1 Post by 72 usmc » Thu Jan 11, 2018 11:56 pm

Military Surplus K98ks, Introduction

You got to love the backbone of the Germany Army, Paul Mauser's design came to a climax in Karabiner K98k. And who would have known that those $200 bring backs in late 1960s would be pushing beyond $1000 depending on its state of matching numbers, metal condition, stock condition, German code & date, bring back papers, sling, bayonet and provenience. Every one would like an intact, bring back K98k. Even one with a miss matched bolt is a great find. But for most, the German K98k rifle is hard to find since most of the WW II guys are gone, and the intact specimen's cost is beyond reach. In addition, due to their high cost, there is a lot of fakery by guys converting almost-matching rifles or sporters back into the more valuable, complete, all-matching German K98ks. Unless you are knowledgeable and well versed in K98k rifle collecting, I would not pay top buck for an intact specimen K98k rifle without consulting an experienced collector. There are just too many fakes to fool a beginning shooter/collector.

On the less expensive side and with a heck of a lot of luck, a great find in my opinion are the mostly-matching K98k rifles. These can come in different ways. Some might be all matching except the bolt--and the bolt may match itself, some may be all matching having a non sanded finish, but the original stock may have been re-varnished or recoated, or some are a 1950’s sporterized rifle with matching numbers except for the missing stock and stock parts. These make great shooters and are more "German" than Mitchell's Mausers, and way less expensive -- just that you do not have Mitchell's Certificate of Authentic Fakery.

Most shooters and even new collectors now have to settle with the common surplus market rebuilds: Russian captures (RC Mausers), Yugoslavian capture M98/48s, Mitchell's Mauser's frauds, or Romanian/Albanian/Balkan captures. There are other types like the harder to find French or Israeli captures; then there are the almost impossible to find Portuguese contract K98, a Yugo refurbished German K98k with markings intact, an Israeli 8mm, German K98k not converted to 7.62 NATO, and the Norwegian K98k captures converted to 30-06. Neither of which I have seen at gun shows for some time. If you find one of these rare ones, it will cost a few more bucks than a common working guy or gal really cares to invest. Other more common K98k rifle types on the surplus market are different versions of the Arctic, Czechoslovakian post-war made K98k rifles with a winter trigger guard and the Israeli 1952 FN Belgian made, NATO K98k with the IDF Crest. From what I observe, these seem to be the more common surplus market K98ks currently found at gun shows.

DISCLAIMER: what I'm about to say should not be construed as the bible, they are just my observations that may be right or wrong on the different attributes used to help identify different kinds of K98k rifles I have encountered over the years, some I own, others I was never lucky enough to find or could buy. The comments are just my personal take on the most obvious traits that help identify the more common surplus K98ks found at gun shows. All observations are subject to correction by expert collectors that own more examples and can provide better details.

What follows is my memory about some of these rifle’s attributes, some notes, and some photos of the above K98k surplus rifles. Consider this write up as a sort of review that is subject to correction by the more experienced collectors. Some pictures are mine, some from the old SRF posts with lost sources, others from a web search. If I know or remember the source I will list the source. Others are grabbed off the net. Most photos are of my rifles and I tried to stay with my photos, but some of the others are just too nice not to post and I give credit to these many great photos - both lost and known sources . I have also provided some links to web pages that have some great information especially on specific K98k examples I never owned or could find at gun shows in the last 35 years.

The main headings will include the following K98ks: Russian Capture, Yugoslav rebuilds, Mitchells Mausers, Romanian /Albanian /Balkan Captures, Czech K 98 mainly the Arctic and Scrubbed versions, as well as the Post War rebuilds, Israeli k98s mainly the Czech rebuilds, FN 7.62 IDF, and Rampant Lion versions, French Capture, and the Norwegian Capture in 30-06 conversion.
Since there will be plenty of photos provided, each heading will be posted as individual replies having its limit of 5 photos per reply since all photos are posted through the forum method so they stay in place. Some headings will require multiple replies in order to review a specific section’s written description and photos. In order to provide a photographic record of a rifles details, some rifles will have as many 15 pictures . Others have much better photo documentation and the link is provided for each example.
Last edited by 72 usmc on Mon Jan 29, 2018 12:20 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Military Surplus k98ks commonly found at gun shows

#2 Post by 72 usmc » Fri Jan 12, 2018 12:03 am

(RC) the Russian Capture K98k

insert photo 1
LM RC  rifle P1.JPG
A nice set of photos of an RC for review see
http://m14forum.com/foreign/178616-rc-k ... heavy.html
I have three Russian RC K98k examples. All have import marks on the barrel, they are not the later ones with an import mark and new SN that was placed as a billboard on the receiver. I remember the first K98k RC showing up at gun shows around 2008/2009. One of mine came from the old Classic Arms when they sold the RC K98ks individually. Classic had pictures and a detailed description of each individual rifle they sold. These were all choice, select, RC specimens sold in 2007-2008. At that time, they added a very nice reproduction cleaning rod and capture screws to their rifles. The Century RC K98Ks were sold around 2007. They came without the sling, cleaning rod, capture screws, and sight hood. Many purchased the original Norwegian cleaning rods, sight hoods, and slings sold by Steward’s Military Antiques to add to their RC.
insert import mk 14
rc import mk 14.JPG
insert photo2 and 2
Empire arm box & photo RCs P2.png
Phosphorus32 gunboard photo of RC from Wideners Feb 20 2014  P2.jpg
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Re: Military Surplus k98ks commonly found at gun shows

#3 Post by 72 usmc » Fri Jan 12, 2018 12:06 am

The Russian Capture K98k had a rough history in which the captured German rifle went through a Russian rebuild program that created a mix master, like new K98k without the consideration for maintaining any of the correct parts originally found on the rifle. Germans numbered or coded almost each part on the K98k. This attention to detail was not maintained by Ivan. A Russian Capture K98k is best identified by its uncharacteristic, non German, blue-black on the metal; a reddish brown shellac on the stock that was also slopped onto the metal parts; a total mix of serial numbers on the parts; and an electro, hand written, force matched serial number on the top of a blued-black bolt that matches the original German SN on the RC’s receiver.
insert rec color photo 7 10
X on receiver side 7.JPG
rc line outs 10.JPG
Insert rc stock color 4 photo
RC stock color 4.JPG
insert bolt & #5
RC bolt & number 5.JPG
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Re: Military Surplus k98ks commonly found at gun shows

#4 Post by 72 usmc » Fri Jan 12, 2018 12:10 am

In addition, there will be a deeply stamped, horizontally placed, Russian serial number that is a force match to the original German receiver’s SN that is stamped on the left side of the stock between the butt plate and stock washer.
insert photo3
stoch & horizontal serial # 3.JPG

On an RC K98k, the receiver and barrel match (original German SN), as well as the rear sight base and front sight. Ivan took all the depot stockpiled, wet, rusted, and deteriorated K98k rifles through a total rebuild program. Each rifle was totally disassembled except the receiver/barrel group; parts cleaned, inspected, and hot dipped, a dull blued black. The assortment of newly blued functional parts were then put into barrels. Stocks were likewise inspected, cleaned, and stockpiled. Ivan then rebuilt the K98k with the parts pulled out of these barrels. They simply started with what ever barrel group and stock that was next in the pile.

No effort was made by the Russians to maintain correctly coded, dated, or serial numbered parts to the receiver/ barrel group. A Russian Capture K98k is a total mix master of German codes, serial numbers, as well as early or late war K98 attributes. You will see a mix of early hardwood stocks on late war receivers or late laminated stocks on early war receivers. You may have a mix of early milled parts and late stamped parts on the same rifle. The RC receiver will have a Russian crossed rifle trademark that looks like an large X. This is stamped on the top or left side of the receiver.
insert x on rc receiver6
RC receiver 6.JPG

insert x on side of receiver 7
X on receiver side 7.JPG

After the rifle was assembled, it was electropenciled by placing the forced matching SN of the rebuilt rifle’s original receiver on the top center of the black-blued bolt.
insert photo 19
268 serial number on RC 19.JPG

Then the remaining other original stamped German serial numbers on the bolt stem and the other small bolt parts were lined out with an electro pen.
insert photo 10
rc line outs 10.JPG
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Re: Military Surplus k98ks commonly found at gun shows

#5 Post by 72 usmc » Fri Jan 12, 2018 12:14 am

On an RC Mauser, the original stamped SNs are not stamped out, instead they are electropenciled out with a scribed line. After the original German stamped SNs were lined out, the Soviets placed the receiver’s two or three digit SN number by electro writing them on the bolt stem, safety lever, cocking piece, and bolt sleeve in order to force match the smaller bolt parts to the Soviet forced matched bolt. The RC bolt is in the black and has a large, hand written SN on its top- this is a very distinct RC trait. It can appear neatly written or be very sloppy depending on the penmanship of the rebuilder.
insert bolt with electro number photo 13
bolt number RC 13.JPG


Finally, the completed, newly rebuilt and headspaced K98k’s stock and hand guard were painted with shellac. After drying, a sander was used to make a flat spot on the left side of the stock between the take down washer and butt plate. This leaves an obvious lighter, sanded mark on the left side of an RC stock. It was not restrained. On this flat spot, the Soviet force matched serial number that is also found electro written on the bolt’s top (which is the same German stamped SN found on the rebuilt RC’s receiver) is deeply and boldly stamped, horizontally or parallel to the barrel at this location on the left side of the stock. Original K98k rifles do not have a SN stamped at this location on the stock. While all of these Russian RC traits are observed, caution must be used. Now, as soon as I tell you the above traits are commonly found on a Russian Capture (RC mauser), I would be dishonest.
insert photo 21
RC stock # horizon 21.JPG
insert photo sanded 23
RC sanded for # collectors Archives photo 23.png
RC sanded for # collectors Archives photo 23.png (129.24 KiB) Viewed 2391 times

The RC K98k rifles come in many shapes and forms with all sort of traits/attributes missing or added---generally no two are the same. There is every variation possible, but the more incomplete the Russian Capture Mauser specimen is; meaning the less Russian modifications seen on an RC, the more rare and hard to find it is- and consequently, the more valuable the specimen is. Most Russian capture mausers share similar traits, but Ivan got lazy or separate rebuild facilities did things differently. There are lots of observed variations.
bolt with out serial number
insert rc photo 9
bolt no electro rc 9.JPG
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Re: Military Surplus k98ks commonly found at gun shows

#6 Post by 72 usmc » Fri Jan 12, 2018 12:17 am

Most RC K98k rifles will be missing the capture screws, sight hood, and cleaning rod. Now Classic added reproductions of these items to the K98k’s they sold around 2008-2010.
insert photo added rod & screws 15 16
added cleaning rod by cleassic 15.JPG
RC added lock screw classic 16.JPG

None came with sling kits or bayonets. Some will have matching parts as if Ivan found these parts so new, he or she did not bother to take it down. Basically it was easier to keep the rifle together during the rebuild rather than run around the factory for parts. Some will have thick, flaking shellac, some a very thin wash of shellac, others lack shellac. Some will retain their correct early or late war features. Most will not. I have some lacking the electro written number on the bolt, I have some lacking the electro scribed line-out through the stamped original German SNs found on the small parts. However, I have never observed an RC lacking the Soviet force matched SN on the left side of the stock. The stock’s restamped, large, deeply set SN is always present even on stocks that retain other German cartouches. I have a normal K98 action in a exsniper stock. It is marked on the left side with the SN. On some rifles the German Waffenampts and dirty bird Swastikas are peened out, on others they remain intact on the rifle- it’s about 50-50. These defacings of the German markings are neatly and carefully done with a single, rounded punch or an elongated, bar-like punch.
insert photo bar stamp14
RC bar stamps dirty birds 14.JPG
insert round dot RC photo 20
ping_ to birds RC 20.JPG
insert photo 25 & 26
defaced swastika RC 25 .jpg
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Re: Military Surplus k98ks commonly found at gun shows

#7 Post by 72 usmc » Fri Jan 12, 2018 12:20 am

insert 26
Ball peens on rc k98 26.png
Ball peens on rc k98 26.png (191.93 KiB) Viewed 2389 times
Generally the Swastika is hit and the punch mark appears as a dot. This produces a nicely done single ping to remove the swastika leaving a stamped dot. Some dirty birds are hit with two or three bar shaped punch marks over the body and wings in order to cancel out the German eagle. More than a few are missing the trade mark “crossed rifle” large X found on RC receivers. I have never seen an example with two X marks on a receiver. However, some X marks are located/stamped on the side, while others are found on the top of the receiver. Some Xs are clearly stamped, others poorly stamped and can appear as a “V”. On a few rifles, if you got a lucky specimen, almost all of the German serial numbers on the small parts remain intact on each part-- not one is lined out. They are true mix masters, yet all the stamped numbers remain intact and unscribed. On these odd versions, sometimes only the bolt is electro penciled with a line out or two showing on only a few of the other bolt parts.
insert x photos 6 17 22 24
RC receiver 6.JPG
small x on receiver RC 17.JPG
Ilarge x rc 22.JPG
Arms list screen shot of Large X RC 24 .jpeg
Arms list screen shot of Large X RC 24 .jpeg (20.07 KiB) Viewed 2389 times
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Re: Military Surplus k98ks commonly found at gun shows

#8 Post by 72 usmc » Fri Jan 12, 2018 12:32 am

On an RC the butt plate, floor plate, stock washed, cross bolt, and the bolt & its bolt parts are reblued with a deep hot dip, RC black-blue. In contrast, on some rifles these parts are left in the bright and were not subjected to reblue. No new Russian made barrels are found on RC K98k rifles, although more than some barrels are found to be counter bored. Rifle barrels range from new to poor. Muzzle wear can vary dramatically. Most are in decent condition, the sewer pipe bores were tossed out by the Russians. I have not found an RC that did not pass a FIELD headspace gauge test. They appear to be rebuilt-like-new rifles utilizing the old parts. No new Russian made parts seem to be found on these rifles, they are refurbished utilizing reused German parts.

The barrel & receiver are German originals. Generally the receiver SN and barrel SN match. I have not seen a miss matched RC receiver and barreled action. I think if one or the other was damaged it went into the melt pot; likewise, damaged stocks most likely went into the factory furnace to heat the building. I have not seen cracked stock RC mausers at gun shows. While most redone rifles have incorrect stocks, they are generally in good condition except for the heavily applied, flaking shellac. Some stocks can exhibit small wood repairs. On some RC examples, I have seen rusted actions that were poorly cleaned then reblued over the rust pits. Likewise, I have seen heavily worn or sanded metal receivers or bolts that were poorly reblued. Some receivers are so worn down that the German receiver code is hard to read. Other specimens look brand new.

A common problem encountered at shows nowadays are Russian Capture K98k rifles that have been modified to look more “German”. This is done by the previous owner. The stock was refinished, the bolt polished bright, and the many line outs polished out and reblued. The Soviet electro written # is removed from the freshly polished bolt. Some even have all the metal reblued more like an original K98k. These look really nice. Reenactors and collectors added original cleaning rods, sight hoods, capture screws as well as original slings. Some add cheep repro slings or cleaning rods that you can identify a mile away. One thing that costs big cash is a switch of the RC incorrect, reddish brown, stock to an original German stock with a correct finish in order to get rid of the give away trait of the Russian horizontally stamped, force matched, serial number on the RC K98k specimen. Germans only put the serial number under the butt or inside the barrel channel on original K98k rifles.

So in conclusion, Russian capture K98k rifles can be recognized by their shellac-finished, reddish brown stock with its Soviet forced matched serial number on the left side. The rifle is a mix master of early and late war attributes --(stamped vs milled), and generally an incorrect stock for the coded & dated receiver. The metal parts are unlike a German blue or phosphate finish. The RC metal has a hot dip, dull, black-blued finish with electropencil numbers on the bolt parts and magazine floorplate, electropenciled line outs are present through the stamped serial numbers on the smaller parts, and all parts commonly have a different stamped SN. It is rare to find an RC with its small parts matching, but such examples are found. The receiver should have, (but not always) a Russian crossed rifle X and the bolt is in the black with the forced matched electro written SN on its top. Sometimes the dirty birds can be intact, other times pinged out. The Russian capture specimen is a total mix master of serial numbers as well as late war and early war parts and stocks. They make great shooters. Some hate them others love them. I like to keep mine in their post-war “Russian” state.
An interesting discussion at Gunboards
“Russian Capture K98 Value (out of date) and Restore Question”
see: http://forums.gunboards.com/showthread. ... e-question

Leave space for RC Empire mar 8 photos in rc orig folder
2-4.JPG
1-3.JPG
1.JPG
2-1.JPG
K98BAR.JPG
Last edited by 72 usmc on Fri Jan 12, 2018 12:37 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Military Surplus k98ks commonly found at gun shows

#9 Post by 72 usmc » Fri Jan 12, 2018 12:36 am

More photos Empire K98K RC
K98REC.JPG
K98PLATE.JPG
K98BAND.JPG
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Re: Military Surplus k98ks commonly found at gun shows

#10 Post by 72 usmc » Fri Jan 12, 2018 12:44 am

Yugo (Yugoslavian) K98k Capture Rebuilds

Shortly after World War II, the Yugoslavians reconditioned or rebuilt their old stocks of captured K98 rifles. There are basically two kinds of captured/discarded Yugo K98ks. The first is a partizan recondition of a K98k that is only partially scrubbed, it is a K98k rifle that mostly retains their original German condition, the barrel is German and stock with its parts generally match. These have original German stocks matching the rifle’s date and code, small parts also match with surviving dirty birds and WaA stamps. The few I have seen still have a serial number stamped into the left side of the stock, but it is the same German barrel/receiver SN. Some of the most prominent Nazi codes on the receiver may be partially scrubbed with just the date remaining on the receiver. The upper receiver code and German proof is removed, but the date remains. Some are lightly scrubbed and there can be faint evidence or traces of the original German receiver codes. Some may have a Yugo crest applied, others do not. An early Yugo reconditioned K98k is not stamped "Mod 98/48". Generally these early reconditioned capture K98k rifles were inspected and only what needed repair to bring it into operational order was fixed. This occurred on early examples sometime around 1945-1947. Of the specimens lacking a Yugo applied crest, I have never actually found/seen an example with all German markings intact; its only modification was just a Yugo SN added on the stock. Maybe such an example exists? The ones I have seen have an applied Yugo crest and a SN stamped on the left side of the stock, but the German date remains and its mostly a German marked K98k.

The second Yugo capture K98k is a Post-War 1948 or later Yugoslav rebuild of a K98k. This is referred to as the Yugo Mod 98/48 and "Mod 98/48” is stamped on the left side receiver rail. It has a scrubbed receiver, all German receiver markings have been removed on the top of the receiver and the 1948 Yugoslav crest was added. The Mod 98/48 most likely will be rebuilt with a new, Yugo made, replacement barrel. Some say these barrels are made to better tolerances than the Nazi barrel. Only a few 98/48s retain their German barrel and that is if its condition was like new. There are Yugoslave proof stampings on the new replacement barrel and it has a Yugo applied, newly restamped serial numbers that match the bolt, stock, and sometimes the floor plate on the rifle. No electro written SNs are found on Yugo rebuilds. All the examples that I have seen have newly stamped numbers. Tito's Communists also stamped a factory rebuild name or code on the left side of the receiver; "Preduzece 44" is the most common factory code, but if I remember correctly, there are also FNRJ, Radionica 124,145, VR 69, and TRZ5 found on the Mod 98/48 rifles. There may be more factory codes, I just have not seen that many examples of the Yugo 98/48 to be sure.



For very large pictures of a complete rifle seen Parallax… see:
https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/paralla ... 41341.html

The Yugo K98ks are original capture K98ks rebuilt Post War in Yugoslavia. The rifles still maintain most of the smaller German markings and have been reblued with a similar looking, high quality blue like found on the German K98ks. The attributes generally found on a Yugo Mod 98/48 rifle consist of the following. First, new Yugo made barrels replace the worn or rusted German barrels. Second, they scrubbed approximately 75% of the German markings from the gun. The receiver's top was milled and polished so the Yugo 1948 crest could be deeply roll stamped into the center of the receiver. The German code and year, as well as larger Nazi markings were neatly removed and the receiver highly polished prior to the application of the crest. No milling lines or marks are visible. Third, a new Yugoslavian serial number was stamped on the barrel, receiver, bolt, and stock. The floor plate may have a scrubbed SN and a new stamped matching serial number applied, or some may have a stamped line-out through the first German SN and above this canceled area, a new Yugo SN is restamped on the floor plate to force match the plate to the reconditioned rifle’s SN number. Consequently on some examples, two numbers can be seen on the floor plate. The Yugo Mod 98/48 is generally a force matched rifle utilizing new stamped, Yugo applied serial numbers. The Yugo Mod 98/48 looks like a typical Nazi K98k, but the rifle can have small punches to the Eagle proofs in an effort to remove Nazi markings. However, most seem to have the smaller markings on the metal parts remaining intact. WaA codes remain, especially small ones located at the receiver’s wood line or ones found on the small parts.

The stock condition is better than seen on RCs, I would say their craftsmanship in general produced a better looking and functioning rifle than the RC.
Some stocks were scrubbed; but, stock condition varies greatly on specimens ranging from original finished, German stocks with some cartouches, to German stocks that are lightly sanded and revarnished. Shellac was not used. The finish looks like some kind of BLO or oil appearing more like an original beat Mauser. It can be light or darkly colored. Dents are present. One of mine looks lightly sanded producing a blond look as seen on a new issue Nazi K98. Although they appear worn, most Yugo M98/48 stocks still have some evidence of German Army proofs/cartouches.
The stock cartouches were not totally sanded away. On the German stock the take down washer is present. On some Yugo rebuilds the German stock was replaced with a Yugo elmwood stock lacking the takedown washer.

There are three big modifications during the Post War rebuild of Yugo K98ks. These traits really identify a Yugo K98k rebuild. First is the scrubbed receiver or partially scrubbed receiver with the application of the Yugo crest.
insert photo 1 and 2
Yugo  43 year still part scrub copy 1.jpg
Yugo k98 with traces of original code  copy 2.jpg


Second, is the application of the factory name or code and "Mod 98/48 " on the receiver of post 1948/49 reworks. Some say this occurred post 1950.
insert photo 3
"Preduzece 44" stands for Institute 44, Kragujevac, Serbia and is commonly marked on the receiver's ring. On the left side of the receiver, the "Mod. 98/48" can be seen on later post 1950 rebuilds. Notice the /48 looks like a hand stamped addition after the MOD 98. The "/48" is absent on all the rifles that have been refurbished before 1950.
Screen Shot 2018-01-13 at 1.24.39 PM.png
Screen Shot 2018-01-13 at 1.19.05 PM.png
Screen Shot 2018-01-13 at 1.19.05 PM.png (228.94 KiB) Viewed 2316 times


Third, and most obvious, the stock’s serial number application is a dead give away to a Yugo rebuild. Similar to a Russian Capture, it is found deeply stamped into the left side of the stock between the take down washer and the butt plate; however, its position is vertical, parallel to the butt plate. In contrast, on the Russian capture it is located horizontal and parallel to the barrel.
insert photo of stock 4
IMG_1022. stock serial #  4.JPG
Last edited by 72 usmc on Sat Jan 13, 2018 2:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Military Surplus k98ks commonly found at gun shows

#11 Post by 72 usmc » Fri Jan 12, 2018 12:50 am

On the early imports I own, a small import mark is stamped on the lower front barrel, not the receiver. One rifle came with very crisp German barrel, the other came with a new Yugo replaced barrel on my 98/48. Both came with original cleaning rods and sight hoods as well as a K98k style, Yugo made sling. Others may have a more common Yugo sling attached with two sling buttons. The rifles came in a box with the sling and a Yugo made bayonet and metal scabbard. Each rifle I own exhibits the better craftsmanship generally found on Yugo rebuilds and a uniform, flawless reblue more similar to a German blue. Barrels are like new or new Yugo replacements. Both headspace. Bolts work smooth as butter. I have not seen ones with counter bores. Both are all matching- no line outs. The M98/48 has restamped SNs. These rifles both retain most of the dirty birds and WaAs; yet, each have scrubbed receivers showing the Yugo Crest and their factory codes on the side rail.

J & G had Yugo K98ks for sale in 2013, although most were found around around 2008-2009. Dunhams Sporting Goods stores had them for sale in WI around 2008. The hardest ones to find are the examples of early ones that are mostly still “German” and retain partial Nazi receiver codes (date), or ones that have their import mark on the barrel- not the billboard on the receiver. To me, cosmetically, the Yugo K98k just feels and looks better than the RC K98k. Yugos have a flawless, dark, reblued to the metal, generally a new barrel- no counter bore, and most of the time the stock finish looks more "German." A person just has to be able to live with the Yugo crest on the receiver and the SN stamped on the left side of the stock. Remember, almost all have like-new barrels and make great shooters. The most common Yugo Mausers you see on the market today are the postwar M24/47s and M48s types, these are not K98ks (the M98/48).
A review “ The Yugoslavian Mystery Mauser 2002 see:
http://rodandgun.netfirms.com/article/M ... Mauser.pdf

insert photos of my Yugo example photos of 145 folder 16 photos
receiver.JPG
IMG_5469.JPG
IMG_5468.JPG
IMG_5462.JPG
IMG_5470.JPG
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Re: Military Surplus k98ks commonly found at gun shows

#12 Post by 72 usmc » Fri Jan 12, 2018 12:52 am

More photos of my Yugos:
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To old to fight and to old to run, a Jar head will just shoot and be done with you.

72 usmc
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Re: Military Surplus k98ks commonly found at gun shows

#13 Post by 72 usmc » Fri Jan 12, 2018 12:54 am

more photos of the Yugos:
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For a quick review of Yugo mauser types see Reddit source of below Quote
A quick guide to Yugoslavian Mausers (self.guns)
submitted 1 year ago by large_poops
So you've begun collecting military surplus guns and next on your list is a German Mauser. The Mosin and the Enfield were pretty cheap, but correct examples of German Mausers are going for $1500+! Luckily for your wallet, many countries copied Mauser's 1898 design making a Mauser experience much more affordable. Currently, Yugoslavian Mausers are on the market for a great price, but there are a fair bit variations that you should be aware of before purchasing one. Let’s begin at the beginning.

Model 1924 (M24) With the First World War over, the newly formed country of Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes (later known as Yugoslavia) decided they wanted a standardized rifle for their front line troops. After a brief trials, they came up with an almost exact copy of Germany's K98k rifle--the biggest difference being that the action was 1/8 inch shorter than Germany’s standard infantry rifle. The first 100,000 rifles came from FN, and the remaining examples (which were produced through WWII) were built at the Yugoslavian national armory. There were three main configurations of this rifle: two carbines and one rifle. C&Rsenal did a great writeup on these guns, which can be found here.
These are actually pretty difficult to find because most were refurbished during the cold war (more on this in about a paragraph). However, they are often mistaken for the much more common refurbished M24/47, and so deals can be found. The current rate on a proper M24 is much higher than other Yugoslavian rifles, so expect to pay a premium.
Action Markings: Yugoslavian Crest with Model 1924
Sidewall Markings:
FAB. NOT. D’ARMES de GUERRE , HERSTAL-BELGIQUE (FN Production 1926-1928)
АРТ. ТЕX. ЗАВОД – Крагујевцу (Artillery Technical Institute 1928-1931)
BOJHOTEX.ЗАВОД – Крагујевцу (Military Technical Institute 1932-1941)

Model 24/47 With the Second World War over and Cold War tensions rising Yugoslavia began preparing for more fighting. To fill their strategic reserve, the young nation began a refurbishment program in 1947 to bring their beaten M24 rifles to tip top condition. This included a standardization of sling swivels, rebluing, as well as scrubbed and re-stamped markings. As we know, the Cold War never developed into fighting and the M24/47 remained in pristine condition. Because of their “recent” refurbishment, they tend to be great shooters. These can be found pretty easily from surplus dealers for right around $300. Action Markings: Yugoslavian Crest, OR Yugoslavian Crest, M24/47
Sidewall Markings:
M24/47 PREDUZECE 44
M24/47 ZAVOD 44
M24/47 TRZ-5

Model 24/52C As 1952 rolled around, Yugoslavia slowed their refurbishment of M24 rifles and and began working on the left over Czechoslovakian vz. 24 rifles (which are different from Yugoslavian M24 rifles!) they received as war reparations. Despite the new rifle (designated M24/52c) resembling the M24/47 rifles, they can easily be identified by their markings. Since the Czech vz. 24 rifles have a history of their own, there are many slight variations that can be found. Depending on the condition of the barrel when rifles reached Yugoslavia, they may have been switched out for a domestically produced M48 barrel. Just like the M24/47 rifles, these guns tend to be in fantastic shape as they never saw action since their refurbishment. M24/52C rifles are slightly more difficult to find than the M24/47 rifles, but they still sell for roughly $300-$400.
Action Markings: Yugoslavian Crest, M24/52c

Model 98/48 Beginning in 1948, Yugoslavia began repairing and refurbishing captured German K98k rifles. During the process, the German rifles had varying levels of their markings removed with Yugoslavian markings added. As a result, there are a number of variations in the markings that can be found, some of which are listed below. Because they are German made, the actions are full length (as opposed to the intermediate length Yugoslavian Mausers). Action Markings: Yugoslavian Crest
Sidewall Markings:
FNRJ Mod. 98
PREDUZECE 44 Mod. 98
PREDUZECE 44 Mod. 98/48
RADIONICA 145 Mod. 98/48

Model 48 In addition to refurbishing guns, the national Yugoslavian armory began production of their new Mauser design, the M48. This new gun had more German features than the prewar Yugoslavian M24 (sight hood, bent bolt handle, cupped buttplate, sling swivel placement), but they stuck with an intermediate length action. By 1952, Yugoslavian engineers designed stamped parts to make production more efficient, resulting in the M48A. This design was updated once again to the M48B (although the receiver crest continued to say M48A). Once again, most of these guns never saw war and are in fantastic condition. For $350 or so, you can find a mint one with a bayonet, cleaning kit, oiler, etc.
In conclusion: Proper German K98k rifles are expensive and highly collectable, making it not necessarily the best choice for a range toy. Luckily, the Yugoslavians made some nice Mauser copies that will give you the Mauser experience at a fraction of the cost. As an added bonus, Yugoslavian M75 sniper ammo has recently hit the market. This highly accurate ammo pairs great with a mint M48 or a nice refurbished rifle. So, if you’re a milsurp guy who wants a nice shooter and doesn’t mind if the gun is of WWII vintage, look into one of the many Yugo Mauser flavors.
Attachments
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Last edited by 72 usmc on Sat Jan 13, 2018 2:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
To old to fight and to old to run, a Jar head will just shoot and be done with you.

72 usmc
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Re: Military Surplus k98ks commonly found at gun shows

#14 Post by 72 usmc » Fri Jan 12, 2018 12:58 am

Mitchell's Mauser, US Remanufactured Rifles


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Mitchell's Mausers takes a select Russian Capture (RC) K98k Mauser and rebuilds the rifle like new at their U. S. factory in Fountain Valley, California. Their ads for these K98k "Original German Mausers from WW II" appeared in Surplus Firearms magazine in 2007-2010. See photo In 2006/2007 they offered Service grade rebuilds at $249, the Collector grade at $399, and a Special Premium grade at $599. If I remember correct, special higher grades were also available. These are well rebuilt rifles with select barrels and crisp Nazi markings. Mitchell’s workmanship is much better than the work done by the crews rebuilding/modifying rifles at Century Arms or by Ivan. The fit and finish on a Mitchell is actually quite good. The bolt is very smooth-headspace is perfect. However, a Mitchell K98k is as far from an original WW II firearm as possible. I do not own an example and my comments are from memory of the ones I would see for sale at the Shawano, WI gun shop back around 1009-1012.

A Mitchell K98k is redone to the point of being a replica firearm. It reminds me of a Denix replica, just that it actually fires and is a real rifle. It is an accurate, well bedded rifle with a great bore, correctly headspaced, nicely refinished, totally reblued, polished, restamped with new matching serial numbers, and even has some added nazi markings. see this photo for an example of the Mitchell blue.
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Consider it like a new rifle with the swindle fraud alert "Letter of Provenance". Some love them, most hate them. Their cost was/is sky high when you buy one. But, try and sell one. For a shooter, I would rather have a 1950s sporterized bring back or a Gibb's conversion. Most collectors object to Mitchell's misleading marketing & high price. Resale value is low, about 1/3 what you paid. Shooters that want a like new, turd conversion, love them and will buy them.
To old to fight and to old to run, a Jar head will just shoot and be done with you.

72 usmc
Gun Nut
Gun Nut
Posts: 788
Joined: Fri Jun 02, 2017 10:28 pm
Age: 67
Location: Menomonee Falls, Wi
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Re: Military Surplus k98ks commonly found at gun shows

#15 Post by 72 usmc » Fri Jan 12, 2018 1:00 am

The primary attributes of a Mitchell rebuild is the fact you are looking at a perfect, like new, all matching replica K98k - a super humped contemporary rifle made from restored original parts. The rifle has been totally reblued with a nice high quality even blue. The metal is selected for the lack of rust pits, so you generally do not see rust pits on the metal. Likewise the stock is a German blond and is well sanded and re stained with a nice smooth finish. The stock looks absolutely mint. The barrel is like new. The bolt is polished and the electro-penciled number is removed from the bolt. All RC serial numbers are rescrubbed, the parts finely polished, and a new "Mitchell" forced match serial number with a wrong font for a German K98 is stamped on the rifle's parts. Bingo, you have an all matching, faked rifle. The deeply stamped RC large X on the receiver is changed to an asterisk by adding two lines stamped through the X.
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To old to fight and to old to run, a Jar head will just shoot and be done with you.

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