Well, the board is either fixed, or it's going to run terribly. Cross your fingers and hope for the best. I'm at my technical limit right now.

Restoring wood finish on Dutch Beaumont. What did they use?

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KneverKnew
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Re: Restoring wood finish on Dutch Beaumont. What did they use?

#16 Post by KneverKnew » Wed Apr 10, 2019 1:21 pm

Ok. A few clarifications. First, I was trying to ask if feiblings is a PASTE, not “a thing of the past.” Dang auto correct.
Also, I made some Gunnys wax a few years back. Still got some. I got out of the Corps in 87, FYI. 😉

Second, explain exactly how you would apply the Chestnut Ridge stock stain, rub in and then how you apply the “strip” of feiblings. I’m picturing applying stock stain as usual with soft rag, let sit then wipe off excess. Or does this stain require a different method than no wax stains? Once dry are you applying one finger “swipe” of feiblings and rubbing it in a little at a time? Never used these before so please explain best you can for my simple mind. Thanks.

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Re: Restoring wood finish on Dutch Beaumont. What did they use?

#17 Post by 72 usmc » Wed Apr 10, 2019 5:51 pm

Fiebrings is a liquid dye like thin alcohol. I aways put a stain or the dye on with a tee shirt rub and gloves. This is not a cream or paste stain. You have more control with a rag application. Not a soaking wet rag, rather an almost dry rag where the color is rubbed in like a French polish on furniture. I guess you got to ask if you want a uniform color stain or a more patchy look with deep color highlighting the wood grain. I like a stock to show aged patina with deep color and some Hardwood grains also showing. I like replicated wear/rub marks where ones hand would have removed the varnish & color with use.

Mini wax natural stain is also thin like water, likewise the Chestnut military stain. All stocks have grain & differences in wood fibers that pick up stain differently on the same stock. With a tee shirt application and a rubbing in of the color you can get a hand rubbed look like the old rifles have. Never soak in a stain, rather, I build up a little more color as I go. Work outside so you can see how the charter of the wood grain as it comes out. Outside light is best to work in. It is not like a board where you splash the stain on. On a rifle stock you want to give it a deep rub both wet and later when dry. So I slightly wet a spot on the rag and rub it onto the stock that has color still present under the removed top coat. I get it to a color I want then move onto a new spot and keep going till the entire stock has got a color rubbed into the wood and you may or may not see the base old color.

You want a uniform stock color? If you are in a hurry and want a uniform stock color, then you can wet the entire rag and do large sections just applying the stain like a thin water paint. Never have so much that it is sitting on the wood waiting to soak in. If you do not like a rag and are not really going to want a hand rubbed surface to highlight wear & stock grain; then use a natural hair, soft, vanish paint brush to apply the Chestnut military stain and have a dry rag to wipe off and excess so there is no drips, stop marks, or puddle marks. That should produce a fast application uniform stain like you are doing a chair. A table top is always a hand rub.

So the stain is on, let it dry a week. Take another tee shirt and rub down the dry stained wood to give it a dry polish. Do you like the color and results. If you want to add more red or brown then you can use the shoe dye, but only a little dab of wet dye on the rag in order to slowly apply by a swift hand rub over the dry wood with a wipe of shoe dye. This is a strong deep color agent. The less the better. This is to produce a deep multi color application like you see the colors in a laminated German K98 stock. If you want a more uniform color it is best to use the military stain direct or premix the stain so you get the correct color in one application. If you need to go darker, you do a second application. Generally it is very difficult to go lighter if you went too dark.

Let your stock, either a hand rub with a rag, or a painted-on stain application only rubbed down to appear uniform in color, dry for a week. Then do a dry rub to polish the wood.
What do you have? If I like it...
Now I add Toms 1/3 and you will see some of the stain come off. I may also add some dye color in areas that I might want more color and Rub it in with the wax.

If it is a uniform stain then you can apply BLO or minimax natural stain to seal in the color. BLO may take a number of applications so it comes out more like an Enfield stock. Or use the minimax natural as a quick wipe over the stock surface to darker and tone the color while setting it into the wood grain. This natural clear stain is also like water, so use very little to set the color. The more you use & soaks into the wood, the more shine the resulting finish will have. Too much and its like a spit shine on dress blue shoes-- bad news on an old stock. I use as little as possible, I also use this to remove color at the wrist and lower front stock so it looks like wear to a stock.
If you used BLO...
Let the BLO dry and see if you are ready to do a second coat of BLO. Or if using the mini wax natural --ONE very light coat only & let it dry.
Now I do the wax application over the mini wax natural finish. Let it dry, I am done. If I want a dull look I use a steel wool 0000 rub to tone it down.
BLO may take a few coats. Then a staples wax application over the BLO.


Some just coat the stain with Toms 1/3 wax or Staples orange wax. Some use tung oil as a final finish. Some like Pine tar.

Do a test on a piece of old wood to gain experience and contemplate possible outcomes. I am not sure what you want.

Because the old stock will retain some color after the poly finish is removed I would not use a rubbing paste stain. Too much color You want the wood to glow and have nice grain and Tone. Its not a uniform painted board. For sh... & giggles watch some videos on how to stain a rifle stock or table top. No rush.
Last edited by 72 usmc on Thu Apr 11, 2019 5:16 pm, edited 2 times in total.
To old to fight and to old to run, a Jar head will just shoot and be done with you.

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Re: Restoring wood finish on Dutch Beaumont. What did they use?

#18 Post by 72 usmc » Wed Apr 10, 2019 5:53 pm

I am not a refinish a stock like new guy. I restore so it looks like old junk- you never know a repair was done. There are lots of ways to refinish a gun stock so it looks new. Just look up how to refinish a gun stock. There is no right or wrong way; all methods give different results.
some of what I like:
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stoch & horizontal serial # 3.JPG (55.54 KiB) Viewed 294 times
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Candyman is the gunny expert at wood see these two methods:
http://www.surplusrifleforum.com/viewto ... =61&t=1230
http://www.surplusrifleforum.com/viewto ... f=61&t=101

Chestnut Ridge military stain example rifles. https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums/s ... p?t=261777
RonsM1left.jpg


Minwax Wood Finish Semi-Transparent Penetrating Stain Natural # 209
This is the natural stain thin like water ( but oil base) that can be used to bring out the deep tone in wood stain. ( I never use water base dye or stain.) (Use alcohol base dye & oil base stains/varnishes. added due to email) Clarification

Try some as a light wipe over any old newly stained board and you will like how it sets the color into the wood fibers. Try 2 applications . You will see a shine. The more you use the more shine to the surface it will produce. Use only 1 fast thin coat with a slightly wet rag.

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Minwax-Wood- ... 9EQAvD_BwE



Semper Fi
I was a track rat 2141 M48A 3, 2142 LVT P5 , 2151 Hydraulic turret specialist 5th ech. 1st FSR, years later FSSG

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mzVdsln29o8

wet sanding to fill pores: oil rubbed finish
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zcy2tPa3hw8

Green scrubby or fine steel wool and stain
https://www.canadianwoodworking.com/tip ... ing-finish


wood finishes the hand rubbed application and brushed application
http://www2.ca.uky.edu/hes/fcs/factshts/hf-lra.055.pdf


Finish type
https://www.chiltons.com/blogs/blog/und ... e-finishes

CMP info http://thecmp.org/training-tech/armorer ... g-article/
To old to fight and to old to run, a Jar head will just shoot and be done with you.

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Re: Restoring wood finish on Dutch Beaumont. What did they use?

#19 Post by 72 usmc » Fri Apr 12, 2019 11:11 pm

I do a rub in rather than a real soaking-in of a stain, dye, or paste because I do not want the color to go into the fibers too deep and possibly become to dark. Its not paint. On new, unstained virgin wood like a chair you can brush it on and let it set, then wipe excess off to deeply set a stain. Remember the rifle stock has a base color already in the wood, do not go too dark.
To old to fight and to old to run, a Jar head will just shoot and be done with you.

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