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DIY ON GUN SPRINGS

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OLDGUNNER
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DIY ON GUN SPRINGS

#1 Post by OLDGUNNER » Mon Apr 16, 2018 1:54 pm

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3CnwUQZ6q78

https://www.bing.com/search?q=making+sp ... FORM=QSRE6

Making a flat, or rehardening a flat spring https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=ho ... ORM=VDQVAP
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For flat or coil gun springs.
One big problem with these spring making videos is....the makers of the videos will too often stress too many ideas that are not necessary and someone watching for the first time may not know any difference. Another problem is that it is hard to show in a short reasonable video how to make a spring. But like anything, once one knows how, it is easy. Some may say one has to use a certain type of special steel, which is generally not true. But one may watch some and get the general idea. An example of this....take a regular paper clip and hammer a piece flat and notice that you will have a ‘flat’ spring. If ones wants a heaver spring, hammer a nail flat. But to make a good spring don’t do this...Just make by hacksaw or file or grinder, a spring with the shape that you wish out of most any kind of steel. If one wishes use a piece of drill rod, an old bed spring will do nicely. A while back I tore an old Bed Box Spring a part and I ended with enough different sizes of steel wire and rods to last a life time. Guns usually use a lot of flat springs, and a spring will wear out – it is called metal fatigue. Bend a paper clip back and forth until it breaks – metal fatigue. A few years ago I needed a heavy duty spring and I bought some music wire up to 1/8th and made a spring winding tool, but for one’s normal gun type flat springs, anyone can make...a piece of old saw blade I have used, a piece of hack saw blade...even a nail will work. For some heavy duty things...an old lawn mower blade.

A piece of so called spring steel is misleading – it is not made from a piece of special steel – it is just basically a piece of carbon steel that has been hardened and then tempered. The secret is to temper it to this certain temperature...in the case of a spring, this blue color. All kinds of springs can be made with nothing more than a regular propane torch – Map Gas if one is in a hurry.

There are just say a few steps in making a steel spring from plain steel. Make it the shape that one wishes...it may be easier to anneal first...heat it until cheery red and quench in plain water – no need for some special quenching oil – warm water will tend to slow the quenching rate down like the oil. To be more technical, use warm salt water...water saturated with salt. This will cause the steel to have a more even hardness...reheat to that blue color mentioned in some videos – that’s it. The regular steel banding strap may be handy for some springs – heat it to cherry red and cool...then make spring and do the heating and quenching and then the tempering to the Blue color. I have a couple of the non-contact thermometers to make heat treating easier.

One may watch some videos and see how differently it can be done.
Last edited by OLDGUNNER on Sat May 05, 2018 9:05 am, edited 1 time in total.
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OLDGUNNER
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 663
Joined: Mon Oct 23, 2017 11:27 pm
Age: 84
Location: USA, Colorado
United States of America

Re: DIY ON GUN SPRINGS

#2 Post by OLDGUNNER » Mon Apr 16, 2018 4:15 pm

OKAY, A QUICK FOLLOW UP...
The most important thing in spring making is the tempering temperature – this will cause it to be a spring or not. This can be a very useful way to make a spring. And since it involves hot lead, it is usually around and handy. And most may have a lead temperature thermometer. Just use this method and make springs to one’s heart’s content. it can be a fool-proof way.

As I copied from a post...a third method for tempering.

A third method which was recommended to me was placing the part in melted lead. Pure lead melts at 615 degrees Fahrenheit (324 degrees C) and can be heated considerably above this point. A high-tempeature thermometer can be used to bring the melt to the correct tempering temperature. I have not tried this method, but if one already has a casting setup and the thermometer, it might be a good way to go. Being in the middle of constructing a new lock and wanting a better way of tempering the main and frizzen spring, I adapted a technique used by watch and clock makers for heat treating delicate or intricate parts. Besides - I wanted an excuse to experiment.

MORE INFORMATION ON TEMPERING....

Tempering
The next step is to reduce this hardness by tempering. The ideal temperature for tempering steel with .6 to .7 % carbon is 700 degrees f. This may be accomplished in several ways.

a.) Lead melts at about this temperature and you may submerge the spring in molten lead until it reaches the point that the lead no longer sticks to it. Submerge the part fully, and remember that steel floats in lead.
b.) Self-cleaning ovens 700 degrees in their cleaning cycle and you can clean your electric oven and temper the spring at the same time, (My wife hates this trick).
c.) Fiercely burning motor oil burns at about this temperature. if you fill a shallow tin with oil to cover the spring and heat it with a torch until it sputters and burns with a roaring flame until the oil burns away you will reach 'draw' or temper.
CAUTION You may have read that springs should be tempered until they are blue. If you polish a piece of steel and heat it slowly until various colors appear. The blues begin to appear at about 580 degrees, at this temper you are in danger of having your spring still brittle and it may break.

After the above has been done the spring is ready for final polish. before any polish is done examine the spring with a magnifying glass to detect any flaws.

Cracks of a circular form in the corners indicate uneven heating. Start again!
Cracks of a vertical nature or dark fissures indicate the steel has been burned. Start again!
Dimples, show that there are hard and soft places and indicate that the heating and cooling has been uneven. Start again!
When the spring is perfect in ever respect polish it to mirror finish and place it under test**.
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