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RUSSIAN 727

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OLDGUNNER
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RUSSIAN 727

#1 Post by OLDGUNNER » Mon Jan 01, 2018 2:23 pm

This is the plane that I flew out of Russia on... Yes, it looks like a Boeing 727. The Russians are famous for coping things especially air planes. They save all the costs on design and development. But they did beef up the landing gear and wings...and have lots of oil to off-set that. And actually they can operate that from a dirt runway. When they copied the B-29, that’s a funny story.
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Re: RUSSIAN 727

#2 Post by WASATCH CHARLIE » Fri Jan 12, 2018 11:29 pm

The RUSSIANS, like TIM TREADWELL (Alaska grizzly guy) are a lot smarter than people give them credit for....heck, look at the SKS !!!!

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Re: RUSSIAN 727

#3 Post by OLDGUNNER » Sun Jan 21, 2018 12:45 pm

Yes, yes indeed...I have always thought someone should basically copy that AK-47...tighten things up here and there and give it a little beefier receiver with a cartridge just a little bit stronger and have one heck-of a military gun by just adding maybe 4 ounces at the most. I know, I know, don't mess with somethings that works. But I can be glad in a way, when a VC shot at me with one and I heard that bullet whiz by my ear much, much too close.

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Re: RUSSIAN 727

#4 Post by echo1 » Sun Jan 21, 2018 1:42 pm

Russian stuff is generally rugged to begin with. It makes total sense that they beef up the gear, run off dirt. Modern DC-3ish. OG, was your rig half people, half cargo on the same deck? PAX

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Re: RUSSIAN 727

#5 Post by echo1 » Sun Jan 21, 2018 1:44 pm

OLDGUNNER wrote:
Sun Jan 21, 2018 12:45 pm
Yes, yes indeed...I have always thought someone should basically copy that AK-47...tighten things up here and there and give it a little beefier receiver with a cartridge just a little bit stronger and have one heck-of a military gun by just adding maybe 4 ounces at the most. I know, I know, don't mess with somethings that works. But I can be glad in a way, when a VC shot at me with one and I heard that bullet whiz by my ear much, much too close.
Didn't you just describe a GALI? PAX

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Re: RUSSIAN 727

#6 Post by OLDGUNNER » Sun Jan 21, 2018 9:03 pm

Hi echo1 - No, the plane was a regular passenger flight to Japan and I didn't recall anything unusual with the hold luggage. But at the time I don't think that those planes were allowed into the US, at least on a regular schedule.
Now for the domestic in-country flights, yes - horses, cattle and whatever.

A Gal, huh?
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Re: RUSSIAN 727

#7 Post by echo1 » Sun Jan 21, 2018 9:37 pm


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Re: RUSSIAN 727

#8 Post by OLDGUNNER » Mon Jan 22, 2018 5:30 pm

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Hi echo1 – I was not familiar with the Galil but yes, it could be a formidable weapon, and it would sure get one’s attention if on the wrong side of it but I would say that it was an ‘incidental type’, that is too heavy to be a front-line carry type. So my vision would be something like half way between the AK- 47 and this. I see the problem with this in the 7.62 Nato the same as the M14 and that would be the logistics of ammunition supply. I see that it is a little lighter than the M14. So I could see say a 5.56 type with a .30 caliber bullet...but everything in life is a compromise.
When I was in Vietnam I was attached to a service unit, H&MS-17, as a noncombatant civilian. From Mid-Night the first day of TET 68 until daylight we were/I was, 50 yards just behind the front lines with nonstop firing with a Marine every 3 or 4 feet with M14’s behind sandbags 2 to 3 foot high. Those sand bags stopped the AK-47 ammunition. This was right at the road by the MAG-11 area, just 40 or 50 yards north of the Mag-11, Dog Patch Gate. I believe the only reason that we were not overrun was because of the M14 versus the AK-47’s. When I left in the fall of 68 they still had M14’s. The only marines, that I saw with the M16’s were basically one’s from the front lines. Which was 7 miles away.
These two .38’s I took to Vietnam with me and I brought them back with me. I kept one under my pillow and carried the other. Notice the AIRWEIGHT, I paid 68 dollars for it new just before I left at a gun store. While I was there I also had an M2 .30 cal Cabine and an M3 .45, which of course I had to leave. The .38 AIRWEIGHT was the favorite with the Pilots to carry.
Funny thing with that 7 mile line. When I first got there it was 5 miles, because the VC had 5 inch Soviet rockets that had a range of 5 miles. They would sneak through the lines at night and set up sets of three, and the next night sneak though again and fire them. For some reason they would only sneak in with enough to fire 3 and then run to next three, etc. It took the Marines this much time to locate the site and fire with their 105’s and 155’s. Then the Soviets developed the 7 inch rocket which had a range of 7 miles. They would go right over us at night but with spent fuel without a sound and land a half a away on the flight line. We had the computers to determine the firing point but It never did any good. They would go out the next morning and just find holes from out artillery.
They would turn out the lights at the beginning of rocket attacks and we would just light candles and keep right on playing poker – the rockets were that accurate.

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Re: RUSSIAN 727

#9 Post by Tommy Atkins » Mon Jan 22, 2018 5:32 pm

"the plane was a regular passenger flight to Japan and I didn't recall anything unusual with the hold luggage."

Not even the pre-palletized loading system"?
:o

When I worked the Caribbean cruise business we frequently docked close to a Soviet (Oh Yes back then) cruise ship, oddly she has a set of long shallow doors in the lower bow area. I asked what their purpose was, as many ships have specialized entry for things.
I was told they were for "Evacuating caskets".
I was ushered away, in Martinique for gods sake, when i asked if the standard casket was a "533 mm (21") 53-51".
Pity, I always liked the ship as they had the real wood while we had veneer, & real silk when we had nylon. It was the Soviet idea of "Decadent Capitalism."!

I assume "casket evacuation" was SOP as was "celestial navigating while looking down & forward" through an optically flat nose panel in Soviet airliners.
Image

:shock: :eusa-shifty:

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Re: RUSSIAN 727

#10 Post by OLDGUNNER » Mon Jan 22, 2018 11:39 pm

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Hi Tommy – No, I just looked back at the plane and took the picture. I have been on Russian ships just twice. The white ship on top was the one that I took to Russia from Japan and the bottom picture was a lapse of good judgment when I just stepped on to a Russian Navy ship and took this one picture. This was when I first found out that I was being followed by the KGB all of the time. The next day I was told most sternly that I will not do anything like that again unless I would like to see the inside of a Gulag.
The name right below the ‘PYCb’ is the way the Russians spell ‘Vladivostok’. I probable did at the time but I don’t know just what language ‘Vladivostok’ is.
Celestial Navigation is the old time honored way to navigate. Every since I went to school in the Air Force at 18 I had/have been working mostly in Airborne Radar and Radio Navigation Systems...not operation but the maintenance of. With ten years maybe it was in Aircraft Inertial Navigation Systems. These were on the Air Force F-104 and the NAVY P3V’S, the Navy’s A6A’s and C2A’s.
Years ago I bought a Sextant just out of curiosity to see how they worked – I still have it. The harder part is determining Longitude, Latitude is no problem.
Oh yes, Celestial Navigation is the old fool proof way to do it. But not as accurate as some of the radio systems. I don’t know just how accurate the new electronic Celestial Systems are. I'll look into that. I have a feeling that they are mainly for convenience.
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