Well, the board is either fixed, or it's going to run terribly. Cross your fingers and hope for the best. I'm at my technical limit right now.

Spurs and the Great West

Message
Author
User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1162
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#946 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jan 27, 2019 1:28 am

Desert View Watchtower, also known as the Indian Watchtower at Desert View, is a 70-foot-high stone building located on the South Rim of the Grand Canyon within Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona, United States. The tower is located at Desert View, more than 20 miles to the east of the main developed area at Grand Canyon Village, toward the east entrance to the park. The four-story structure, completed in 1932, was designed by American architect Mary Colter, an employee of the Fred Harvey Company who also created and designed many other buildings in the Grand Canyon vicinity including Hermit's Rest and the Lookout Studio.

The watchtower was the last of the series of Mary Colter-designed visitor concession structures at the Grand Canyon until her renovation of the Bright Angel Lodge in 1935. The tower was designed to resemble an Ancient Pueblo Peoples watchtower, but its size dwarfs any known Pueblan-built tower. The closest prototypes for such a structure may be found at Hovenweep National Monument. The structure is composed of a circular coursed masonry tower rising from a rubble base. The base was intentionally designed to convey a partly ruinous appearance, perhaps of an older structure on which the watchtower was later built. The base is arranged within a large circle with the tower to the north. Tiny windows are irregularly disposed, some of which are themselves irregular in shape. The main space is the Kiva Room in the base structure, apparently roofed with logs that were salvaged from the old Grandview Hotel. The ceiling is a false structure concealing the roof structure that supports an observation deck. The Kiva Room features a fireplace with a large picture window directly above where the chimney would ordinarily go. Smoke is drawn away through an offset, concealed flue. The room still contains its original furnishings, which are part of the historic designation. A separate, apparently ruinous structure was actually built in that form to provide a storage place for firewood.

The tower rises as an open shaft lined by circular balconies overlooking the central space. Access from balcony to balcony is provided by small stairways. At the top the space is decked over, creating an enclosed observation level with large glazed windows. An open observation area on the roof of this space is now closed to visitors and is used for radio equipment. The steel and concrete structure of the observation level is concealed behind plaster, stone and wood. Small windows in the tower's shaft let beams of light into the lower space. The tower also features a number of "reflectoscopes" — black mirrors to reflect the view of the canyon in a more abstract style, providing visitors an alternative view of the Canyon.

Mary Colter spent six months researching archeological prototypes and construction techniques before building a model of the site, studying the design of the tower using clay. Before the final design was completed Colter had a 70-foot platform built to assess the views from the proposed site. Engineering was provided by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway. Greer's rock art paintings are copies of now-destroyed petroglyphs at Abo, New Mexico, and may be their only surviving representation.
Attachments
desert.jpg
desert2.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1162
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#947 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jan 27, 2019 5:19 pm

A hoodoo (also called a tent rock, fairy chimney or earth pyramid) is a tall, thin spire of rock that protrudes from the bottom of an arid drainage basin or badland. Hoodoos typically consist of relatively soft rock topped by harder, less easily eroded stone that protects each column from the elements. They generally form within sedimentary rock and volcanic rock formations.

Hoodoos are found mainly in the desert in dry, hot areas. In common usage, the difference between hoodoos and pinnacles (or spires) is that hoodoos have a variable thickness often described as having a "totem pole-shaped body". A spire, on the other hand, has a smoother profile or uniform thickness that tapers from the ground upward.

Hoodoos range in size from the height of an average human to heights exceeding a 10-story building. Hoodoo shapes are affected by the erosional patterns of alternating hard and softer rock layers. Minerals deposited within different rock types cause hoodoos to have different colors throughout their height.

Hoodoos are commonly found on the Colorado Plateau and in the Badlands regions of the northern Great Plains. While hoodoos are scattered throughout these areas, nowhere in the world are they as abundant as in the northern section of Bryce Canyon National Park, located in the U.S. state of Utah. Hoodoos are also very prominent a few hundred miles away at Goblin Valley State Park on the eastern side of the San Rafael Swell.
Attachments
hoodoos.jpg
hoodoos2.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1162
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#948 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jan 27, 2019 6:50 pm

This building is next to the highway outside of Cody, Wyoming. There is nothing to indicate what it is. I assume someone was just indulging his imagination when he built his house.
Attachments
DSC01069.JPG
DSC01067.JPG

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1162
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#949 Post by nrobertb » Mon Jan 28, 2019 11:04 am

Bryce Canyon Lodge is a lodge in Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah. It was built between 1924 and 1925 using local materials. Designed by architect Gilbert Stanley Underwood, the lodge is an excellent example of National Park Service Rustic design. It is the only remaining completely original structure of the lodges designed by Underwood for Bryce Canyon National Park, Zion National Park and the North Rim of the Grand Canyon.

The two-story Lodge is built on a stone base with intentionally oversized log framing, creating a massive, rustic appearance. The central portion of the building dates to 1924, with the addition of the north and southeast wings taking place in 1926. The lodge is entered by a long porch fronting the entire lobby, whose roof rests on a 52-foot long log beam supported by paired log columns. The lodge is capped by a heavy, steeply-pitched shingled roof with clipped gables and shed dormers.

The main floor of the lodge comprises the lobby, a dining room, a small auditorium, a gift shop, kitchen and administrative and utility spaces. The dining room and auditorium are open to the roof with exposed log trusses. The lobby features milled timbers with Arts and Crafts detailing. Fireplaces of rough rubble stone are found in the lobby, where the firebox is constructed in a pointed arch, and in the auditorium. A basement underlies much of the main level.

The lodge's roof is notable for its unusual shingling pattern, originally designed by Underwood, in which the lower edges of the horizontal shingle courses form irregular, undulating moiré or wave-like patterns across the roof. This gives an impression that the roof is warped, or in motion. This unique shingling pattern is on the original cabins as well as the main lodge buildings, and has been replicated with each re-roofing of the complex, using the original pattern, as a way to keep the craftsman's trademarks of the original builders and Underwood's design.

The Bryce Canyon Lodge was built by the Utah Parks Company, a subsidiary of the Union Pacific Railroad, as part of the railroad's project to develop tourist traffic to Bryce, Zion and the Grand Canyon by providing noteworthy destination hotels at each park. The Union Pacific was following in the footsteps of other railroads' efforts to promote the western parks of the United States and Canada. Architect Gilbert Stanley Underwood was in charge of the design work for the Union Pacific hotels. Construction at the Bryce Lodge started in 1924 and was completed in the early summer of 1925. The guest wings were added in 1926 and the auditorium in 1927. The lodge and cabins were declared a National Historic Landmark on May 28, 1987 under the name "Bryce Canyon Lodge and Deluxe Cabins."
Attachments
Bryce.jpg
bryce2.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1162
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#950 Post by nrobertb » Mon Jan 28, 2019 6:24 pm

A favorite tourist pastime in the western parks is to feed the rodents that come begging at the scenic overlooks. To city folk they are all “chipmunks”. In fact, most of them are golden mantled ground squirrels, which are larger and don’t have stripes on their heads. The photos show the difference. The other photo shows my sister feeding an actual chipmunk at Rocky Mountain National Park in 1947.
Attachments
Feeding chipmunk, Rocky Mt..jpg
golden-mantled.jpg
chipmunk.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1162
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#951 Post by nrobertb » Tue Jan 29, 2019 10:47 am

Spurs by C.P. Shipley (1864-1933).
Attachments
cp-shipley-spurs-580x409.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1162
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#952 Post by nrobertb » Tue Jan 29, 2019 5:16 pm

A fumarole is an opening in a planet's crust, often in areas surrounding volcanoes, which emits steam and gases such as carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, hydrogen chloride, and hydrogen sulfide. The steam forms when superheated water condenses as its pressure drops when it emerges from the ground.

Fumaroles may occur along tiny cracks or long fissures, in chaotic clusters or fields, and on the surfaces of lava flows and of thick deposits of pyroclastic flows. A fumarole field is an area of thermal springs and gas vents where magma or hot igneous rocks at shallow depth release gases or interact with groundwater.

Fumaroles may persist for decades or centuries if located above a persistent heat source; or they may disappear within weeks to months if they occur atop a fresh volcanic deposit that quickly cools. The Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes, for example, was formed during the 1912 eruption of Novarupta in Alaska. Initially, thousands of fumaroles occurred in the cooling ash from the eruption, but over time most of them have become extinct.

An estimated four thousand fumaroles exist within the boundaries of Yellowstone National Park in the United States. In April 2006 fumarole emissions killed three ski-patrol workers east of Chair 3 at Mammoth Mountain Ski Area in California. The workers were overpowered by toxic fumes that had accumulated in a crevasse they had fallen into.

The photos are of fossil fumaroles at Crater Lake National Park in Oregon.
Attachments
.jpeg
fuma.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1162
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#953 Post by nrobertb » Wed Jan 30, 2019 10:47 am

Spurs by Robert Evans of Hart. Texas.
Attachments
evans2.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1162
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#954 Post by nrobertb » Wed Jan 30, 2019 4:09 pm

Zion Lodge is located in Zion National Park, Utah, United States. The lodge was designed in 1924 as a compromise solution between its developer, the Utah Parks Company, which wanted a large hotel, and National Park Service director Stephen Mather, who desired smaller-scale development. The Utah Parks Company had been formed in 1923 as a subsidiary of the Union Pacific Railroad, and was, like many similar programs, intended to stimulate passenger rail traffic to the national parks of southwest Utah.

Gilbert Stanley Underwood designed the Zion Lodge as part of a series of similar structures for the Utah Parks Company at the north rim of the Grand Canyon and at Bryce Canyon National Park. Underwood's design was more modest in scale and detailing than those at the Grand Canyon and Bryce, substituting milled lumber for whole logs in a "studs-out" style. Underwood used less stonework, in smaller pieces. The structures were designed to be more in keeping with the character of the valley floor, which at the time of construction was still inhabited by settlers. Underwood would go on to design all of the Utah Parks Company buildings in the valley, many of which are included in the Zion Lodge Historic District, which surrounds the lodge.

A fire in 1966 destroyed the original lodge. It was rebuilt within 100 days, but the original rustic look was lost in favor of expedience in reopening the lodge. A 1990 remodel restored its original look.

In addition to the main lodge building there are a number of original buildings that remain in the lodge complex. This includes guest cabins built in 1927 and 1929, employee dormitories built in 1927 and 1937, and a few support buildings. All were designed by Underwood.

On April 12, 1995, a landslide blocked the Virgin River downstream from the lodge. Over a period of two hours, the river had carved away 590 feet of the only exit road from the canyon, trapping 450 guests and employees in the lodge. A one-lane temporary road was constructed within 24 hours to allow evacuation. Access to the lodge was restored on May 25, 1995.
Attachments
zion2.jpg
zion.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1162
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#955 Post by nrobertb » Thu Jan 31, 2019 1:06 am

A charro is a traditional horseman from Mexico, originating in the central-western regions primarily in the states of Jalisco, Michoacan, Zacatecas, Durango, Chihuahua, Aguascalientes and Guanajuato. The photo is a traditional Mexican charro saddle.
Attachments
charro.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1162
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#956 Post by nrobertb » Thu Jan 31, 2019 2:40 pm

A Wade tree saddle is a slick fork buckaroo style that is specifically built to be a working saddle. It's designed for handling livestock and for maximum comfort during long, strenuous hours in the saddle. Wade saddles have been popular with working cowboys in the Rocky Mountain region for some time. The photo shows the saddle tree before the leather is added.
Attachments
Wade_fork.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1162
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#957 Post by nrobertb » Thu Jan 31, 2019 11:43 pm

A wade style saddle:
Attachments
wade.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1162
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#958 Post by nrobertb » Fri Feb 01, 2019 9:23 am

A great motor sport of the west is desert motorcycle racing. I got involved in it when I lived in Utah back in the 70’s. There were three Salt Lake City clubs that put on races and hillclimbs.

I started out small to learn the fundamentals on a modified Yamaha 100cc motocross bike. Eventually I was able to win the 100cc class in an 80 mile race. Later I moved up to a Honda XL250 with a different countersprocket to lower the gears. With the street package removed and plastic fenders, it was quite competitive.

Desert bikes then included names like Husqvarna, Maico, CZ, Hodaka, Penton and a slew of Yamahas, Suzukis and Kawasakis.

They’d start us in 3 waves: first the Experts, then the Intermediates, and finally the Novices. Races were usually run in 2 or 3 loops, to allow refueling and maintenance.

The photo shows the start of one big race. I can make out a couple of Huskies in the foreground.
Attachments
motorcycle.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1162
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#959 Post by nrobertb » Fri Feb 01, 2019 3:41 pm

On the southern edge of Draper, Utah, two-story homes populate a wedge of land once occupied only by dirt and sagebrush. A scarred 1,000-foot hillside is the single remaining clue that the area hosted an internationally recognized spectacle for 25 years.

From 1963 to 1988, "The Widowmaker" attracted thousands of revved-up motorcyclists looking for the rides of their lives in the sport of hill climbing, speeding to the top of steep hills as fast as possible.

Hill climbers hailing from across the globe returned each year — along with visitors and national television coverage — to see if they could conquer one of the toughest tracks in the world. Only a handful of people claimed victory before The Widowmaker's end.

Fourteen years later, fans of the hill climb proved their devotion by opening their own version of The Widowmaker, in Croydon. But like its predecessor, the event eventually shuttered amid land disputes.

I participated in the Widowmaker in 1974 and got second in the 100cc class.
Attachments
widow.jpg
widow2.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1162
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#960 Post by nrobertb » Sat Feb 02, 2019 10:54 am

Another pair by Robert Evans of Hart, Texas.
Attachments
evans4.jpg

Post Reply

Return to “General Off Topic”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests