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Spurs and the Great West

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nrobertb
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#931 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jan 20, 2019 6:45 pm

Sorry about the double post. Is there a way to delete a post?

Another nice Damascus knife.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#932 Post by nrobertb » Mon Jan 21, 2019 10:32 am

Breakaway roping is a variation of calf roping where a calf is roped, but not thrown and tied. It is a rodeo event that features a calf and one mounted rider. The calves are moved one at a time through narrow runs leading to a chute with spring-loaded doors. The horse and rider wait in a box next to the chute that has a spring-loaded rope, known as the barrier, stretched in front. A light rope is fastened from the chute to the calf's neck, releasing once the calf is well away from the chute and releasing the barrier, which is used to ensure that the calf gets a head start. Once the barrier has released, the horse runs out of the box while the roper attempts to throw a lasso around the neck of the calf.

Once the rope is around the calf's neck, the roper signals the horse to stop suddenly. The rope is tied to the saddle horn with a string. When the calf hits the end of the rope, the rope is pulled tight and the string breaks. The breaking of the string marks the end of the run. The rope usually has a small white flag at the end that makes the moment the rope breaks more easily seen by the timer. The fastest run wins.

Breakaway roping is usually seen in junior, high school, college and semi-professional rodeos. At the collegiate level, it is a primarily a women's event, but at other levels competitors are both male and female. Some amateur rodeos also have breakaway roping as part of their event line-up. It is also used as a substitute for calf roping in some parts of Europe, where traditional calf roping, also called tie-down roping, is banned.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#933 Post by nrobertb » Mon Jan 21, 2019 3:23 pm

Chihuahuan Desert -- the largest desert in North America covering more than 200,000 square miles -- Most of it lies south of the international border. In the U.S. it extends into parts of New Mexico, Texas and sections of southeastern Arizona. Its minimum elevation is above 1,000 feet, but the vast majority of this desert lies at elevations between 3,500 and 5,000 feet.

Winter temperatures are cool, and summer temperatures are extremely hot. Most of the area receives less than 10 inches of rainfall yearly .While some winter rain falls, most precipitation occurs during the summer months.

This desert covers such a large area that it is difficult to characterize its geology, but limestone and calcareous soils are common.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#934 Post by nrobertb » Tue Jan 22, 2019 1:28 am

The Mojave Desert is an arid rain-shadow desert and the driest desert in North America. It is in the southwestern United States, primarily within southeastern California and southern Nevada, and it occupies 47,877 sq mi. Very small areas also extend into Utah and Arizona. Its boundaries are generally noted by the presence of Joshua trees, which are native only to the Mojave Desert and are considered an indicator species, and it is believed to support an additional 1,750 to 2,000 species of plants. The central part of the desert is sparsely populated, while its peripheries support large communities such as Las Vegas, Barstow, Lancaster, Palmdale, Victorville, and St. George.

The Mojave Desert is bordered by the Great Basin Desert to its north and the Sonoran Desert to its south and east. Topographical boundaries include the Tehachapi Mountains to the west, and the San Gabriel Mountains and San Bernardino Mountains to the south. The mountain boundaries are distinct because they are outlined by the two largest faults in California – the San Andreas and Garlock faults. The Mojave Desert displays typical basin and range topography. Higher elevations above 2,000 ft in the Mojave are commonly referred to as the High Desert; however, Death Valley is the lowest elevation in North America at 280 ft below sea level and is one of the Mojave Desert's more notorious places. The Mojave Desert occupies less than 50,000 sq mi, making it the smallest of the North American deserts.

The Mojave Desert is often referred to as the "high desert", in contrast to the "low desert", the Sonoran Desert to the south. However, the Mojave Desert is generally lower than the Great Basin Desert to the north. The spelling Mojave originates from the Spanish language while the spelling Mohave comes from modern English. Both are used today, although the Mojave Tribal Nation officially uses the spelling Mojave; the word is a shortened form of Hamakhaave, their endonym in their native language, which means 'beside the water'.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#935 Post by nrobertb » Tue Jan 22, 2019 1:15 pm

The Great Basin Desert is part of the Great Basin between the Sierra Nevada and the Wasatch Range. The desert is a geographical region that largely overlaps the Great Basin shrub steppe defined by the World Wildlife Fund, and the Central Basin and Range ecoregion defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and United States Geological Survey. It is a temperate desert with hot, dry summers and snowy winters. The desert spans a large part of the state of Nevada, and extends into western Utah, eastern California, and Idaho. The desert is one of the four biologically defined deserts in North America, in addition to the Mojave, Sonoran, and Chihuahuan Deserts.

Basin and range topography characterizes the desert: wide valleys bordered by parallel mountain ranges generally oriented north-south. There are more than 33 peaks within the desert with summits higher than 9,800 feet, but valleys in the region are also high, most with elevations above 3,900 feet. The biological communities of the Great Basin Desert vary according to altitude: from low salty dry lakes, up through rolling sagebrush valleys, to pinyon-juniper forests. The significant variation between valleys and peaks has created a variety of habitat niches, which has in turn led to many small, isolated populations of genetically unique plant and animal species throughout the region. According to Grayson, more than 600 species of vertebrates live in the floristic Great Basin, which has a similar areal footprint to the ecoregion.

The ecology of the desert varies across geography, also. The desert’s high elevation and location between mountain ranges influences regional climate: the desert formed by the rain shadow of the Sierra Nevada that blocks moisture from the Pacific Ocean, while the Rocky Mountains create a barrier effect that restricts moisture from the Gulf of Mexico. Different locations in the desert have different amounts of precipitation, depending on the strength of these rain shadows. The environment is influenced by Pleistocene lakes that dried after the last ice age: Lake Lahontan and Lake Bonneville. Each of these lakes left different amounts of salinity and alkalinity.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#936 Post by nrobertb » Tue Jan 22, 2019 6:16 pm

The Sonoran Desert (Spanish: Desierto de Sonora) is a North American desert which covers large parts of the Southwestern United States in Arizona and California and of Northwestern Mexico in Sonora, Baja California, and Baja California Sur. It is the hottest desert in Mexico. It has an area of 260,000 square kilometers. The western portion of the United States–Mexico border passes through the Sonoran Desert.

In phytogeography, the Sonoran Desert is within the Sonoran Floristic Province of the Madrean Region in southwestern North America, part of the Holarctic Kingdom of the northern Western Hemisphere. The desert contains a variety of unique and endemic plants and animals, such as the saguaro (Carnegiea gigantea) and organ pipe cactus (Stenocereus thurberi).
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#937 Post by nrobertb » Wed Jan 23, 2019 10:35 am

These spurs are marked lazy j bar c.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#938 Post by nrobertb » Wed Jan 23, 2019 5:08 pm

A pair of spurs by Nels and Tom Qualey. Each spur has a differerent set of initials,
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#939 Post by nrobertb » Thu Jan 24, 2019 12:56 am

Hopi House is located on the South Rim of the Grand Canyon, within Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona. Built in 1904 as concessioner facilities at the South Rim were being developed, it is the first of eight projects at the Grand Canyon that were designed by architect Mary Colter, along with Bright Angel Lodge, Hermit's Rest, Lookout Studio, Phantom Ranch, Desert View Watchtower, Colter Hall and Victor Hall, (the latter two being employee dormitories). Hopi House was built by the Fred Harvey Company as a market for Native American crafts, made by artisans on the site. The Hopi, as the historic inhabitants of the area, were chosen as the featured artisans, and the building was designed to closely resemble a traditional Hopi pueblo. Hopi House opened on January 1, 1905, two weeks before the El Tovar Hotel, located just to the west, was opened.

Mary Colter had worked on a number of projects for the Fred Harvey Company, principally as an architect and interior designer. She was particularly successful in a similar project, the Indian Building at the Fred Harvey Company's Alvarado Hotel (now demolished) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Colter planned Hopi House as a sort of living museum, in which Hopi Indians could live while making and selling traditional crafts. The structure was based on Colter's interpretation of the Hopi dwelling at Oraibi, Arizona. The ethnohistorically-correct structure was at the time of its construction the first introduction for many park visitors to the architecture and life of the native peoples of Arizona, New Mexico, Utah and Colorado. A variety of interior spaces provide museum, sales and demonstration space.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#940 Post by nrobertb » Thu Jan 24, 2019 1:16 pm

Elowah Falls, also called McCord Creek Falls, is a 213-foot waterfall on the Columbia River Gorge, Multnomah County, Oregon. Elowah Falls is one of several waterfalls along McCord Creek. The Creek and the waterfall are within the limits of the John B. Yeon State Scenic Corridor.

The name of the waterfall carried the name of the creek that forms it: McCord Falls. In 1915 the Mazamas successfully had the falls renamed to Elowah. The meaning of the term is unknown.

The waterfall is formed as McCord Creek is forced into a narrow channel by sheer cliffs and shoots at high velocity into a natural amphitheater of layered basalt. Lichens and mosses are very common, covering up to eighty percent of the ground surface under and around the vascular plants.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#941 Post by nrobertb » Thu Jan 24, 2019 3:44 pm

Verkamp's store was a fixture on the south rim of the Grand Canyon for decades.

John Verkamp headed to the developing South Rim in 1898. He set up a tent and sold souvenirs to the few people who made the long stagecoach trip to the rim. Not happy with the volume of business, at the end of the summer he sold his inventory to one of the hotel operators and went back to Flagstaff.

Development of the South Rim boomed with the completion of the railroad spur in 1901. Verkamp returned to the South Rim in 1905 and constructed the current building with supplies shipped in from Los Angeles. He opened his business early in 1906.

January 31, 1906 $4.98 A good day.
So recorded John Verkamp in the ledger for his first day of business in the new store on the South Rim of Grand Canyon. After such a promising start, Verkamp's Curios would continue operations for more than a century.

The Verkamps built their business on service to their guests, service to their employees, and service to their community. The Verkamps bought from some of the same Native American artisans for 25 to 50 years. All employees received training to explain the history and meaning of sales items, believing that an informed guest was a pleased buyer.

For decades the Verkamp family operated the Verkamp's store as a concession permitted by the National Park Service. When their contract last came up for renewal, the Verkamps chose not to compete for a new one. The National Park Service purchased the building and opened it in November 2008 as a visitor center and Grand Canyon Association bookstore.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#942 Post by nrobertb » Fri Jan 25, 2019 12:57 am

The earliest simple bullet molds cast a single round ball.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#943 Post by nrobertb » Fri Jan 25, 2019 4:26 pm

Some bullet molds cast both a round ball and a conical bullet.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#944 Post by nrobertb » Sat Jan 26, 2019 10:28 am

Before metallic cartridges, people carried their gunpowder in steer or ox horns. Some were pretty crude, others more ornate.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#945 Post by nrobertb » Sat Jan 26, 2019 5:38 pm

A pair of G.S. Garcia spurs.
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