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Spurs and the Great West

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nrobertb
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#886 Post by nrobertb » Sat Dec 29, 2018 12:11 pm

"Heart" spurs.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#887 Post by nrobertb » Sat Dec 29, 2018 6:06 pm

An old style half seat saddle,
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#888 Post by nrobertb » Sun Dec 30, 2018 11:42 am

The Pacific Crest Trail, officially designated as the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail (PCT) is a long-distance hiking and equestrian trail closely aligned with the highest portion of the Sierra Nevada and Cascade mountain ranges, which lie 100 to 150 miles east of the U.S. Pacific coast. The trail's southern terminus is on the U.S. border with Mexico, just south of Campo, California, and its northern terminus on the Canada–US border on the edge of Manning Park in British Columbia; its corridor through the U.S. is in the states of California, Oregon, and Washington.

The Pacific Crest Trail is 2,653 mi long and ranges in elevation from just above sea level at the Oregon–Washington border to 13,153 feet at Forester Pass in the Sierra Nevada. The route passes through 25 national forests and 7 national parks. Its midpoint is near Chester, California (near Mt. Lassen), where the Sierra and Cascade mountain ranges meet.

It was designated a National Scenic Trail in 1968, although it was not officially completed until 1993. The PCT was conceived by Clinton Churchill Clarke in 1932. It received official status under the National Trails System Act of 1968.

It is the westernmost and second longest component of the Triple Crown of Hiking and is part of the 6,875-mile Great Western Loop.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#889 Post by nrobertb » Sun Dec 30, 2018 5:16 pm

Lava Beds National Monument is located in northeastern California, in Siskiyou and Modoc counties. The monument lies on the northeastern flank of Medicine Lake Volcano and has the largest total area covered by a volcano in the Cascade Range.

The region in and around Lava Beds National Monument lies at the junction of the Sierra-Klamath, Cascade, and the Great Basin physiographic provinces. The monument was established as a United States National Monument on November 21, 1925, and includes more than 46,000 acres.

Lava Beds National Monument has numerous lava tube caves, with 25 having marked entrances and developed trails for public access and exploration. The monument also offers trails through the high Great Basin xeric shrubland desert landscape and the volcanic field. In 1872 and 1873, the area was the site of the Modoc War, involving a band led by Kintpuash (also known as Captain Jack). The area of Captain Jack's Stronghold was named in his honor.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#890 Post by nrobertb » Mon Dec 31, 2018 11:39 am

Prison made spurs.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#891 Post by nrobertb » Mon Dec 31, 2018 5:43 pm

In 1964 as a seasonal naturalist, once a week I gave slide talks to the lodge residents.

Crater Lake Lodge is a hotel built in 1915 to provide overnight accommodations for visitors to Crater Lake National Park in southern Oregon.
The lodge is located on the southwest rim of the Crater Lake caldera overlooking the lake 1,000 feet below. The lodge is owned by the National Park Service, and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Crater Lake lies inside a caldera created 7,700 years ago when the 12,000-foot-high Mount Mazama collapsed following a large volcanic eruption. Over the following millennium, the caldera was filled with rain water forming today's lake. The Klamath Indians revered Crater Lake for its deep blue waters. In 1853, three gold miners found the lake. They named it Deep Blue Lake, but because the lake was so high in the Cascade Range the discovery was soon forgotten.

In 1886, Captain Clarence Dutton led a United States Geological Survey party to Crater Lake. Dutton's team carried a half-ton survey boat, the Cleetwood, up the steep mountain slope and lowered it 2,000 feet into the lake. From the Cleetwood, Dutton used piano wire to measure the depth of the lake at 168 different points. The survey team determined the lake was 1,996 feet deep. This is surprisingly close to the modern sonar-based readings made in 1959 that established the lake's deepest point at 1,932 feet (589 m).

William Gladstone Steel accompanied the Dutton party in 1886. He named many of the lake's landmarks including Wizard Island, Llao Rock, and Skell Head, and participated in lake surveys that provided scientific evidence of the lake's uniqueness. After he returned, Steel began advocating that Crater Lake be established as a national park. On 22 May 1902, President Theodore Roosevelt signed a bill making Crater Lake the United States' sixth national park. The idea of building a guest lodge at Crater Lake was first raised by Steel shortly after the park was established.

In 1909, Steel finally convinced a Portland developer, Alfred Parkhurst, to build a lodge on the rim above Crater Lake. The average winter snowfall at Crater Lake is 533 inches (13.5 m) mAs a result, the lodge structure was required to carry an extremely heavy snow load for up to eight months every year. Neither Parkhurst or the project's architects R. L. Hockenberry & Company had experience building structures in a demanding environment like the Crater Lake rim site. In addition, building materials had to be trucked to the site over very poor park roads, and the construction season was limited to only three summer months. These factors combined to slow construction and drive up project costs. To compensate, Parkhurst kept the structure very simple. For example, the exterior was covered in tar-paper and the interior walls were finished with a thin cardboard-like wallboard called "beaver board." The lodge had no private bathrooms and the only electricity came from a small generator.

When Crater Lake Lodge opened in 1915, it drew many visitors despite the lack of amenities. The magnificent view of Crater Lake and the surrounding peaks of the Cascade Mountains kept a steady flow of visitor coming to the lodge.

In 1922, a two-year facility upgrade project was begun. The project doubled the number of guest rooms, and added private bathrooms in the lodge's new wing. However, lack of money left many of the new rooms unfinished. The number of visitors to the park decreased during the Great Depression, and the lodge suffered financially from the decline in visitation. As a result, very little was spent on facility maintenance. However, the guest rooms on the second and third floors were finished in the mid-1930s.

Over the years, cars had destroyed most of the vegetation around the lodge. During the 1930s, the Civilian Conservation Corps built Rim Village adjacent to the lodge. Their work included landscaping around the lodge, something the privately operated lodge could not afford to do on its own. The new landscape included hundreds of indigenous trees and shrubs that helped blend the lodge structure into its surroundings environment. In addition, the National Park Service paved the lodge parking areas and adjacent walkways. This significantly reduced the dust and erosion problems around the building.

During World War II, both Crater Lake National Park and the Crater Lake Lodge were closed to the public. After the war, park visitation increased dramatically and the lodge benefited from the increase in tourism. The National Park Service continually pushed the lodge operator to upgrade the facility, but little was done to maintain the structure beyond basic utilities maintenance and required fire safety measures. Eventually, cables had to be stretched between the north and south walls to keep them from bowing.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#892 Post by nrobertb » Wed Jan 02, 2019 11:07 am

"Cheyenne Frontier Days™ is an outdoor rodeo and western celebration in the United States, held annually since 1897 in Cheyenne, Wyoming. It bills itself as the "World's Largest Outdoor Rodeo and Western Celebration." The event, claimed to be one of the largest of its kind in the world, draws nearly 200,000 annually. Lodging fills up quickly during the peak tourist season throughout southern and eastern Wyoming, into northern Colorado and western Nebraska. The celebration is held during the ten days centered about the last full week of July. In 2008, Cheyenne Frontier Days was inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#893 Post by nrobertb » Wed Jan 02, 2019 8:25 pm

A pair of Crockett spurs.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#894 Post by nrobertb » Thu Jan 03, 2019 10:46 am

The Pendleton Round-Up is a major annual rodeo in the northwestern United States, at Pendleton in northeastern Oregon. Held at the Pendleton Round-Up Stadium during the second full week of September each year since 1910, the rodeo brings roughly 50,000 people every year to the city. The Pendleton Round-Up is a member of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA). The ProRodeo Hall of Fame in Colorado Springs, Colorado, inducted the Pendleton Round-Up in 2008.

The Round-Up was incorporated as a not-for-profit organization 501(C) 4 July 29, 1910, as the "Northwestern Frontier Exhibition Association." The rodeo was primarily a creation of local ranchers led by Herman Rosenberg.

The Pendleton Round-Up has won the prestigious PRCA Large Outdoor Rodeo of the Year award six times: 2003, 2010, 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#895 Post by nrobertb » Thu Jan 03, 2019 6:49 pm

The Pacific Northwest Trail (PNT) is a 1200-mile hiking trail running from the Continental Divide in Montana to the Pacific Ocean on Washington’s Olympic Coast. Along the way, the PNT crosses three national parks, seven national forests, two other national scenic trails, and against the grain of several mountain ranges, including the Continental Divide, Whitefish Divide, Purcells, Selkirks, Kettles, Cascades, and Olympics. The Pacific Northwest Trail was designated as the Pacific Northwest National Scenic Trail by Congress in 2009.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#896 Post by nrobertb » Fri Jan 04, 2019 10:40 am

Here's a pair of spurs by August Buermann.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#897 Post by nrobertb » Fri Jan 04, 2019 4:49 pm

Goat tying is a rodeo event that is typically seen in youth, high school and college rodeos in which the participant rides to a tethered goat, dismounts, catches, throws, and ties any three of its legs together. The goat must stay tied for six seconds after the contestant has backed away from the animal. If the goat becomes untied before six seconds have passed, the rider receives no score. A participant may be disqualified for undue roughness while handling the goat, touching the goat after the tie, or after signaling completion of the tie a contestant's horse coming in contact with the goat or tether while the contestant still has control of the horse.

The event is not seen in professional rodeo, but is a common event seen at youth, high school rodeo and intercollegiate rodeo levels. In most cases it is considered a women's event.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#898 Post by nrobertb » Sat Jan 05, 2019 11:56 am

The Colorado Trail is a long-distance trail running for 486 miles (782 km) from the mouth of Waterton Canyon southwest of Denver to Durango in Colorado, United States. Its highest point is 13,271 feet (4,045 m) above sea level, and most of the trail is above 10,000 feet (3,000 m). Despite its high elevation, the trail often dips below the alpine timberline to provide refuge from the exposed, storm-prone regions above.

The Colorado Trail was built and is currently maintained by the non-profit Colorado Trail Foundation and the United States Forest Service, and was connected in 1987.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#899 Post by nrobertb » Sat Jan 05, 2019 5:55 pm

This is a modern Wade style saddle, very popular for roping.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#900 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jan 06, 2019 11:16 am

Here is an old Bowie knife with an unusual brass treatment on the blade.
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