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Spurs and the Great West

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nrobertb
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#856 Post by nrobertb » Fri Dec 14, 2018 5:19 pm

A knife by Jim Behring.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#857 Post by nrobertb » Sat Dec 15, 2018 11:04 am

Team roping consists of two ropers; here, the header has roped the steer and is setting up to allow the heeler to rope the back legs of the steer.
Team roping also known as heading and heeling is a rodeo event that features a steer (typically a Corriente) and two mounted riders. The first roper is referred to as the "header", the person who ropes the front of the steer, usually around the horns, but it is also legal for the rope to go around the neck, or go around one horn and the nose resulting in what they call a "half head". Once the steer is caught by one of the three legal head catches, the header must dally (wrap the rope around the rubber covered saddle horn) and use his horse to turn the steer to the left. The second is the "heeler", who ropes the steer by its hind feet after the "header" has turned the steer, with a five-second penalty assessed to the end time if only one leg is caught. Team roping is the only rodeo event where men and women compete equally together in professionally sanctioned competition, in both single-gender or mixed-gender teams.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#858 Post by nrobertb » Sat Dec 15, 2018 4:29 pm

A skinning knife with Roosevelt elk antler handle, from JJ Knives.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#859 Post by nrobertb » Sun Dec 16, 2018 11:15 am

Medicine Rocks State Park is a park owned by the state of Montana. It is located about 25 miles west-southwest of Baker, Montana, and 11 miles north of Ekalaka, Montana. The park is named for the "Medicine Rocks," a series of sandstone pillars similar to hoodoos some 60 to 80 feet high with eerie undulations, holes, and tunnels in them. The rocks contain numerous examples of Native American rock art, and are considered a sacred holy place by Plains Indians.Theodore Roosevelt said Medicine Rocks was "as fantastically beautiful a place as I have ever seen".

Medicine Rocks is part of the Fort Union Formation, a geologic unit containing coal, sandstone, and shale in Montana, Wyoming, and other adjacent states. About 61 million years ago, near the start of the Paleocene Epoch and during the late Zuñi sequence, a freshwater river crossed what is now eastern Montana, flowing southeast into a prehistoric sea whose boundary was near far northwestern South Dakota. This river deposited large amounts of very fine-grained sand, which compacted into sandstone. On top of the freshwater sandstone was sand laid down by a saltwater estuary (indicated by the presence in this greyish layer of sandstone of burrows created by marine worms). Numerous fossils dating back 63.3 million years can be found at the site, which help date the sandstone. These include several fossil snakes as well as teeth belonging to an early primate-like mammal.

Wind, dirt, sand, and rain carved the sandstone over the millennia, so that now the structures exhibit numerous arches, caves, columns, holes, pillars, and flat-topped towers. Some of the sandstone structures are 60 to 80 feet in height, and can be 200 feet across. There are more than 100 of the rocks and spires in the state park today. Some of them are clustered together as if part of a chain or train, while others jut up from the prairie in isolation.

Archaeological evidence indicates that there has been human habitation at or near Medicine Rocks for about 11,000 years. Aside from the other-worldly nature of the rock formations, Native Americans were attracted to the site because of the many medicinal plants which grew there and the fossil seashells which could be gathered for decorations. Many Plains Indian tribes resided here permanently or temporarily, including the A'aninin, Arikara, Assiniboine Sioux, Cheyenne, Crow, Mandan, and Sioux. The Cheyenne stopped at Medicine Rocks on their way from the Yellowstone River Valley to the Black Hills each summer and early fall. Sometime prior to the mid-17th century, the Hidatsa leader No-Vitals led a large number of Hidatsa out of what is now western North Dakota west into the Yellowstone River valley of south-central Montana, where the new tribe (the Crow) lived on the plains, by the river, and in the nearby Big Horn, Pryor, and Wolf Mountains. On the move due to pressure from eastern and midwestern tribes moving west due to white encroachment, the Crow may have settled in the Yellowstone Valley only a few decades before the arrival of Lewis and Clark in 1804. Bone and stone tools, fire rings (circles of stones used to contain a bonfire), pottery, teepee rings (circles of stones used to hold down the edges of a teepee), and other artifacts have all been found at Medicine Rocks.

White settlers first moved into the area near Medicine Rocks in the 1880s. In 1888, the Standard Cattle Company established the "101 Ranch" in the area, which moved more than 30,000 head of cattle every year from Wyoming to Fallon County (Carter County then being part of Fallon County) and then to Wibaux (a cattle shipping hub for the Northern Pacific Railroad). Hundreds of cowboys worked the ranch, and many stayed—helping to "settle" the country for whites. Many of the cowpunchers carved their names or graffiti into the sandstone of Medicine Rocks.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#860 Post by nrobertb » Sun Dec 16, 2018 6:13 pm

Historically, steer wrestling was not a part of ranch life. The event originated in the 1890s, and is claimed to have been started by an individual named Bill Pickett, a Wild West Show performer said to have caught a runaway steer by wrestling it to the ground. There are several versions of the story, some claiming that he developed the idea after he observed how cattle dogs worked with unruly animals.

The event features a steer and two mounted cowboys, along with a number of supporting characters. The steers are moved through narrow pathways leading to a chute with spring-loaded doors. A barrier rope is fastened around the steer's neck which is used to ensure that the steer gets a head start. The rope length is determined by arena length. On one side of the chute is the "hazer", whose job is to ride parallel with the steer once it begins running and ensure it runs in a straight line, on the other side of the chute the "steer wrestler" or "bulldogger" waits behind a taut rope fastened with an easily broken string which is fastened to the rope on the steer.

When the steer wrestler is ready he "calls" for the steer by nodding his head and the chute man trips a lever opening the doors. The suddenly freed steer breaks out running, shadowed by the hazer. When the steer reaches the end of his rope, it pops off and simultaneously releases the barrier for the steer wrestler. The steer wrestler attempts to catch up to the running steer, lean over the side of the horse which is running flat out and grab the horns of the running steer. The steer wrestler then is pulled off his horse by the slowing steer and plants his heels into the dirt further slowing the steer and himself. He then takes one hand off the horns, reaches down and grabs the nose of the steer pulling the steer off balance and ultimately "throwing" the steer to the ground. Once all four legs are off the ground, an official waves a flag marking the official end and a time is taken. The steer is released and trots off.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#861 Post by nrobertb » Mon Dec 17, 2018 10:40 am

Here's a proud weaver with her rug at a store in Cortez, Colorado.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#862 Post by nrobertb » Mon Dec 17, 2018 12:03 pm

here's the finished version of the rod cutter I posted earlier.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#863 Post by nrobertb » Mon Dec 17, 2018 8:23 pm

Calf roping as a rodeo event had its origin in ranch work. The event derives from the duties of actual working cowboys, which often required catching and restraining calves for branding or medical treatment. Ranch hands took pride in the speed with which they could rope and tie calves which soon turned their work into informal contests.

The calves are lined up in a row and moved through narrow runways leading to a chute with spring-loaded doors. When a calf enters the chute, a door is closed behind it and a lightweight 28-foot rope, attached to a trip lever, is fastened around the calf's neck. The lever holds a taut cord or "barrier" that runs across a large pen or "box" at one side of the calf chute, where the horse and rider wait. The barrier is used to ensure that the calf gets a head start. When the roper is ready, he or she calls for the calf, and the chute operator pulls a lever opening the chute doors and releasing the calf. The calf runs out in a straight line. When the calf reaches the end of the rope, that trips the lever, the rope falls off the calf, and the barrier for the horse is released, starting the clock and allowing horse and rider to chase the calf.

Timing is critical. From a standstill, a rider will put his horse into a gallop from the box shortly after the calf leaves the chute, so that the horse saves valuable seconds by being at near-full speed the moment the barrier releases. However, if the rider mistimes his cue to the horse and the horse breaks the barrier before it releases, a 10-second penalty will be added to his time. This is sometimes referred to as a "Cowboy Speeding Ticket."

The rider must lasso the calf from horseback by throwing a loop of the lariat around the calf's neck. Once the rope is around the calf's neck, the roper signals the horse to stop quickly while he dismounts and runs to the calf. The calf must be stopped by the rope but cannot be thrown to the ground by the rope. If the calf falls, the roper loses seconds because he must allow the calf to get back on its feet. When the roper reaches the calf, he picks it up and flips it onto its side. Once the calf is on the ground, the roper ties three of the calf's legs together with a short rope known as a tie-down rope or "piggin' string". A half hitch knot is used, sometimes referred to colloquially as "two wraps and a hooey" or a "wrap and a slap". The piggin' string is often carried between the roper's teeth until he uses it. The horse is trained to assist the roper by slowly backing away from the calf to maintain a steady tension on the rope.

When the tie is complete, the roper throws his hands in the air to signal "time" and stop the clock. The roper then returns to his horse, mounts, and moves the horse forward to relax the tension on the rope. The timer waits for six seconds, during which the calf must stay tied before an official time is recorded. Top professional calf ropers will rope and tie a calf in 7 seconds. The world record is just over 6 seconds.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#864 Post by nrobertb » Tue Dec 18, 2018 10:10 am

A pair of California style spurs.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#865 Post by nrobertb » Tue Dec 18, 2018 5:03 pm

Hells Gate State Park is a public recreation area located on the southern edge of Lewiston, Idaho, at the Snake River's downstream entrance to Hells Canyon, the deepest canyon in North America. The state park was created by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to mitigate the construction of the Lower Granite Dam; the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation began leasing the site in 1973. The park's 960 acres offer trails for hiking, mountain biking, and horseback riding as well as opportunities for camping, picnicking, fishing, boating, swimming, and taking jet boat trips into the canyon. The park sits at the lowest elevation of any Idaho state park, at 733 feet above sea level.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#866 Post by nrobertb » Wed Dec 19, 2018 10:34 am

The steer roper starts behind a "barrier" - a taut rope fastened with an easily broken string which is fastened lightly to the steer. When the roper calls for the steer, the chute man trips a lever, opening the doors. The steer breaks out running. When the steer reaches the end of the tether, the string breaks, releasing the barrier for the horse and roper. Should the roper break the barrier, a 10-second penalty is added to his time. The roper must throw his rope in a loop around the steer's horns.

Once the rope is around the steer's horns, a right-handed roper throws the slack of the rope over the steer's right hip and then turns his horse to the left; when the rope comes tight, it pulls on the steer's hip up and turns the steer's head around, tripping or unbalancing the steer so that it falls. The roper dismounts while his horse continues to gallop, pulling the steer along the ground, which prevents the animal from getting back to its feet. The horse is trained to slow once the rider is completely off the horse and has reached the steer, but to keep the rope taunt while the contestant ties three of the steer's legs together with a piggin string using a half hitch knot colloquially called a hooey.

The roper returns to his horse, mounts, and moves the horse forward, releasing the tension on the rope. An official will then time six seconds. If the steer is still tied at the end of the six seconds, an official time for the event is awarded.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#867 Post by nrobertb » Wed Dec 19, 2018 4:27 pm

Great western character actors:
Parley Baer was born on August 5, 1914 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA as Parley Edward Baer. He was an actor, known for License to Drive (1988), A Fever in the Blood (1961) and Dave (1993). He was married to Ernestine Clarke. He died on November 22, 2002 in Los Angeles, California, USA.

The voice of Ernie Keebler on the Keebler cookies commercials.

In addition to the role of Chester on the Gunsmoke radio series which ran from 1952 to 1961 (the part was played by Dennis Weaver in the long-running television series), Baer was frequently heard on the Lux Radio Theater, Escape and Suspense radio programs, among others.
During his struggling years, he served as a ringmaster for Circus Vargas and Barnum & Bailey. He would later serve on the board of the community L.A. Circus, and as a docent at the Los Angeles Zoo. Wrote publicity for Al. G. Barnes Circus, in winters. Announcer at Salt Lake City radio station, KSL.
Hefty, balding character actor of mostly comedy hijinks who, during his six-decade career, proved a durable, hot-headed foil for TV's top sitcom stars such as Lucille Ball, Ozzie Nelson and Andy Griffith.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#868 Post by nrobertb » Thu Dec 20, 2018 10:25 am

A pair of spurs with D9 scratched on them. Maybe a ranch brand?
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#869 Post by nrobertb » Thu Dec 20, 2018 4:10 pm

Chuckwagon racing is an equestrian rodeo sport in which drivers in a chuckwagon led by a team of Thoroughbred horses race around a track. The sport is most popular in the Prairie Provinces of Canada, where the World Professional Chuckwagon Association and the Canadian Professional Chuckwagon Association, are the two major racing circuits. The most famous chuckwagon race in the world is held annually at the Calgary Stampede, where the total prize money for the ten-day event tops C$2.0 million.

Chuckwagon racing is a team event, led by a driver who commands a team of horses pulling the chuckwagon, and is supported by two or four outriders, each racing individual thoroughbred horses that follow the chuckwagon. Each race typically involves three or four teams, and begins with the outriders "breaking camp", by tossing two tent poles (with four outriders only) and a barrel representing a camp stove into the back of their wagon before mounting their horses and following the wagons as they complete a figure eight around two barrels before circling a race track. The first wagon to cross the finish line typically wins, although various time penalties are handed out for infractions such as a barrel being knocked over, a tent pole or stove not loaded, wagon interference or an outrider crossing the finish line too far behind his wagon driver.

The first time chuckwagon races were held as a spectator sport was at the 1923 Calgary Stampede. Guy Weadick, who had founded the Stampede eleven years previously, invited ranchers to enter their chuckwagons and crews to compete for a total of $275 in prize money.

The actual origin of the sport is unknown, with many different stories offered to explain how it originated. Among them are the suggestion that Weadick first saw a similar event at the 1922 Gleichen Stampede, that he saw impromptu races between chuckwagon drivers as a kid growing up, or that cooks from two chuckwagons who had completed serving a barbecue at the 1919 Victory Stampede in Calgary then raced to the grandstand's exit, inspiring the event.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#870 Post by nrobertb » Fri Dec 21, 2018 10:41 am

Paintbrush Canyon is located in Grand Teton National Park, in the state of Wyoming. The canyon was formed by glaciers which retreated at the end of the last glacial maximum approximately 15,000 years ago. The canyon lies between Rockchuck Peak and Mount Saint John to the south and Mount Woodring to the north. Leigh Lake is at the base of the canyon to the east and the alpine Holly Lake is located mid canyon. Popular with hikers, the canyon is part of a popular circuit hike of 19.2 miles which is rated as very strenuous and includes a total elevation change of 3,845 feet due to the ascent to Paintbrush Divide 10,720 feet. Views from Paintbrush Divide include Lake Solitude (which is also passed on the circuit hike) and of Mount Moran to the north and the Cathedral Group including Grand Teton to the south. An ice axe may be necessary for hikes in the early summer. The Paintbrush Canyon Trail is part of the Teton Crest Trail, which spans the southern section of the Teton Range from Teton Pass along Wyoming Highway 22 to String Lake, a total distance of 39 miles.
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