Spurs and the Great West

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nrobertb
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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The Wyoming Territorial Prison is a former federal government prison near Laramie, Wyoming. Built in 1872 it is one of the oldest buildings in Wyoming. It operated as a federal penitentiary from 1872 to 1890, and as a state prison from 1890 to 1901. It was then transferred to the University of Wyoming and was used as an agricultural experiment station until 1989. In 1991 the facility was opened to the public, and in 2004 was designated as Wyoming Territorial Prison State Historic Site.

The prison was built in 1872 and began accepting prisoners in early 1873. The facility had problems from the outset, with a fire in 1873 and recurrent jailbreaks. Of the 44 prisoners accepted in the first two years of operation, 11 escaped. By 1877 the prison was overcrowded. As the prison filled its reputation worsened, and it became less used, being considered more appropriate for those with light sentences. During the 1880s the prison was under capacity, with as few as three prisoners at one time. However, in 1889 a second cellblock was constructed,a expanding capacity to 150 and providing a central kitchen, dining hall, guards' rooms and steam heat. There were at least five cells for female inmates, and several solitary confinement cells. In 1890 Wyoming became a state and the facility was transferred to the new state, which already had planned a new facility in Rawlins. Butch Cassidy was incarcerated here in 1894-1896. Prisoners were transferred to Rawlins in 1901, The prison was closed in 1903 and given to the University of Wyoming.

In 2004 it was established as Wyoming Territorial Prison State Historic Site. When it was built the Wyoming Territorial Penitentiary stood apart from Laramie on the west side of the town, surrounded by open land. The principal buildings are built of rough gray sandstone, embellished by brown sandstone quoining and arches. The original cellblock measured about 40 feet by 70 feet, a mansard roofed rectangular building with a prominent, steeply pitched cross gable. Tall windows with dormers above illuminate the interior, where most of the cellblocks have been removed and the space adapted to house animals. The original plan consisted of three tiers of cells, each tier with 14 8-foot square cells, heated by fireplaces at either end of the cellblock. The prison was enclosed by a wooden fence, 12 feet high.

The warden's residence was built in 1875 by convicts. The stucco-covered stone structure later housed the superintendent of the stock farm. The interior, which once had 12-foot ceilings, has been much altered. It was connected to the main building by a tunnel for steam pipes.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Tioga Pass (el. 9,943 ft. ) is a mountain pass in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California. State Route 120 runs through it, and serves as the eastern entry point for Yosemite National Park, at the Tioga Pass Entrance Station. It is the highest highway pass in California and in the Sierra Nevada. Mount Dana is to the east of the pass. There are several trailheads into the Yosemite backcountry which begin at Tioga Pass, including the trail to the Gaylor Lakes to the west/northwest, and the rough trail to the summit of Mount Dana. Dana Meadows is immediately south of the pass alongside the highway, as the pass itself is roughly angled north/south as opposed to east/west. Dana Meadows contains several small lakes.

This pass, like many other passes in the Sierra Nevada, has a gradual approach from the west and drops off to the east dramatically, losing more than 3,000 ft by the time the road reaches U.S. Route 395.

Tioga Pass is named after Tioga Mine, whose name originated in New York: "Tioga" is named for an Iroquois and Mohawk term meaning "where it forks".

The pass is subject to winter closure, due to high snowfall, normally from around the end of October until the end of May the following year, though these dates are subject to considerable variation. In heavy snow years, the road has closed in early October, and has remained closed as late as early July. In light snow years, the road may remain open until December and open as early as April.

Tioga Pass is the most direct route from Bishop or Mammoth Lakes, California to Fresno, Merced, and Stockton. There are four highway passes to the north, between Yosemite and Lake Tahoe, but none to the south for about 200 miles (300 km), until Sherman Pass in southern Tulare County.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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The Pecos River originates in eastern New Mexico and flows into Texas, emptying into the Rio Grande. Its headwaters are on the eastern slope of the Sangre de Cristo mountain range in Mora County north of Pecos, NM, at an elevation of over 12,000 feet feet. The river flows for 926 miles before reaching the Rio Grande near Del Rio. Its drainage basin encompasses about 44,300 square miles.

The name "Pecos" derives from the Keresan (Native American language) term for the Pecos Pueblo.

The river played a large role in the exploration of Texas by the Spanish. In the latter half of the 19th century, "West of the Pecos" was a reference to the rugged desolation of the Wild West. The Texas storekeeper, bartender, and justice of the peace, Roy Bean, a native of Kentucky, was often described as "The Only Law West of the Pecos", a phrase made popular from the 1956 syndicated television series, Judge Roy Bean, with Edgar Buchanan in the starring role. In the series narration, "West of the Pecos" is described as:

the wildest spot in the United States ... virtually beyond the reach of the authorities, the railroads, then pushing their way west, attracted the most vicious characters in the country. It was said that all civilization and law stopped at the east bank of the Pecos. It took one man, a lone storekeeper who was sick of the lawlessness, to change all this. His name was Judge Roy Bean."

Multiple dams have been built along the Pecos River. Santa Rosa Lake is 117 miles/188 km east of Albuquerque. Sumner Lake, formed by the 1939 Sumner Dam, is located between Santa Rosa and Fort Sumner, NM. Two dams are located north of Carlsbad, New Mexico, at Avalon Dam and Brantley Dam, to help irrigate about 25,000 acres as part of the Carlsbad reclamation project (established in 1906). Texas has also dammed the river at the Red Bluff Dam in the western part of that state to form the Red Bluff Reservoir. The portion of the reservoir that extends into New Mexico forms the lowest point in that state.

On June 6, 1990, 20.5 miles of the Pecos River—from its headwaters to the townsite of Tererro—received National Wild and Scenic River designation. It includes 13.5 miles designated "wild" and 7 miles designated "recreational".
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Togwotee Pass (pronounced toe'-ga-tee) (el. 9,655 feet) is a mountain pass located on the Continental Divide in the Absaroka Mountains of the United States, between the towns of Dubois and Moran Junction, Wyoming in the Jackson Hole valley.

U.S. Highway 287 and U.S. Highway 26 cross the pass, which is located approximately 25 miles east of Moran Junction. The pass provides the most direct access to Grand Teton National Park from eastern Wyoming. Located between Two Ocean Mountain and Breccia Peak, sweeping vistas of the Teton Range are visible from the western slopes of the pass.

The pass is located in the Bridger-Teton National Forest and adjacent to Shoshone National Forest. The pass receives heavy winter snowfall and is a top destination for snowmobiling and cross-country skiing. Snowfall at the pass often exceeds 25 feet (reports of over 50 feet of snow are also known) in any given winter and the road can be shut down for days at a time during blizzards. The Continental Divide Snowmobile Trail passes through the immediate area.

The pass is named for Togwotee, a subchief under Chief Washakie of the Sheepeater tribe, a branch of the Shoshones. Togwotee led a U.S. government exploratory expedition over this pass in 1873.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Great western character actors: Jay C. Flippen

Jay C. Flippen could probably be characterized these days as one of those distinctive faces you know but whose name escapes you while viewing old 50s and 60s movies and TV. His distinctive bulldog mug, beetle brows, bulky features, and silver-white hair were ideally suited for roles as criminals and rugged adventurers, while his background in vaudeville and minstrel shows helped him obtain roles in occasional fluffy slapstick and light musical comedy. Flippen was already a veteran performer on radio and the Broadway stage by the time he focused on film. He could be counted on to provide his patented gruff and bluster in many a action film whether playing a sheriff, prison warden, military high-ranker, bartender, or farmer. Moreover, his characters supported James Stewart in several of his standard vehicles, including Winchester '73 (1950), Bend of the River (1952), Thunder Bay (1953), The Far Country (1954), Strategic Air Command (1955), The Restless Breed (1957), Night Passage (1957), and Firecreek (1968). Dogged by illness but determined in later years, he continued his career in a wheelchair following a leg amputation. He was married for 25 years to screenwriter Ruth Brooks Flippen, whose work included a couple of Gidget movies. He died at age 72 of an aneurysm; which is a rupture of a swollen artery.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Another pair of August Buermann's spurs.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Great western character actors: Chela Alonso.

If the name isn't familiar, she was the wife whose family is killed by Lee Van Cleef at the start of "The Good , the Bad and the Ugly."

The darkly stunning Alonso was born Isabel Apolonia García Hernández in Central Lugareño, Camagüey, Cuba, on April 10, 1933, to a Cuban father and Mexican mother. Attracted to dancing, she began performing seriously in Havana at age 17, and soon earned notoriety at Cuba's National Theatre for her sensual, exotic style. She took her trade to Paris in 1957 and became the toast of the Folies Bergère as an up-and-coming Josephine Baker. Billed as the "Cuban H-Bomb", she combined her native Afro-Cuban rhythms with a seductive belly-dancing style that encouraged wolf whistles wherever she toured, which would eventually include Puerto Rico, Haiti and even the United States.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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City of Rocks State Park is a state park near Faywood, New Mexico, consisting of large sculptured rock formations in the shape of pinnacles or boulders rising as high as 40 feet.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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nrobertb wrote: Tue Nov 20, 2018 7:41 pm Great western character actors: Chela Alonso.

Attracted to dancing, she began performing seriously in Havana at age 17, and soon earned notoriety at Cuba's National Theatre for her sensual, exotic style. She took her trade to Paris in 1957 and became the toast of the Folies Bergère as an up-and-coming Josephine Baker. Billed as the "Cuban H-Bomb", she combined her native Afro-Cuban rhythms with a seductive belly-dancing style that encouraged wolf whistles wherever she toured, which would eventually include Puerto Rico, Haiti and even the United States.
Dear Lord man, You can not post things like this without examples.. I am only human :)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GqKKTMyt_TE
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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When I worked at Capulin Mountain (now Volcano) National Monument in the 1960's, the old hotel in the nearby town of Folsom was still open for business. When I went by there a couple of years ago it was all closed up as in the photo.

The Folsom Hotel, at southwest of junction of Grand Ave. and Wall St. in Folsom, New Mexico, is a historic stone building built in 1888 that served as a department store and as a hotel. It was listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in 1987.

The hotel was originally the Drew & Phillips General Mercantile Store; it was modified by John Odell in 1910 to serve as a hotel.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Rabbit Ears Pass (el. 9426 ft.) is a high mountain pass in the Rocky Mountains of northern Colorado in the United States. The summit has the shape of rabbit ears, which displays two large columns of basalt rock formations from the second volcanic episode.

The Rabbit Ears Pass area covers 56 square miles in north central Colorado at the junction of the Rabbit Ears Range and the Park Range. The Rabbit Ear Pass highway, which is one of the most important transcontinental road links in the nation, has been built by the state of Colorado, Routt, Grand, and Jackson counties and the Forest Service of United States. It was started in 1911 and was not completed until 1917. Present work is along lines of reducing curves and improving the roadbed. The road connects Routt with Jackson and Grand counties and furnishes direct connection with Denver by way of Kremmling and Berthoud Pass, where the main range is crossed again. The pass straddles the Continental Divide at the southern end of the Park Range. The name is taken from nearby Rabbit Ears Peak, a mountain in the Park Range to the north that is prominently visible from the east side of the pass during good weather. The pass separates the upper basin of the Yampa River on the west from North Park and the upper basin of the North Platte River on the east. U.S. Highway 40 travels over the pass between Steamboat Springs and Kremmling; this is one of three crossings of the Continental Divide along the highway, along with nearby Muddy Pass to the southeast and the much higher Berthoud Pass closer to Denver.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Berthoud pass is located west of Denver, and provides a high route between upper Clear Creek Canyon to the upper valley of the Fraser River in Middle Park to the north. The pass traverses the continental divide at the Front Range, on the border between Clear Creek County and Grand County.

The pass is named for Edward L. Berthoud, the chief surveyor of the Colorado Central Railroad during the 1870s. Accompanied by Jim Bridger, Berthoud discovered the pass in July 1861 while surveying a possible route for the railroad. Berthoud concluded that the pass was suitable as a wagon road, but not as a railroad, and was then hired by the Central Overland California and Pikes Peak Express Company to survey a route over the pass to Salt Lake.

The pass is currently the route of U.S. Highway 40, north of its junction with Interstate 70 in Clear Creek Canyon. It provides the fastest road access to Winter Park and a secondary route to Steamboat Springs from Denver and the Colorado Front Range. However, the pass is one of the most notoriously difficult passes in Colorado for motorists, based on its height as well as the steep grades on both sides (6.3%) and the large number of switchbacks on the southern side of the pass. At least 55 avalanche paths have been mapped on Berthoud Pass; with some of them intersecting U.S. Highway 40, and a smaller subset of paths intersecting the roadway at multiple points on the pass. In 2015, CDOT installed an automated propane-fueled avalanche mitigation system consisting of five units that create concussive blasts to mitigate snow slab buildup on avalanche path #5, Stanley.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Here's a roll of outdoor knives from Etsy, with rosewood handles.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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n the late 1800s, Stagebarn Canyon near Piedmont, South Dakota was a bustling hub for horses and stagecoaches. The Deadwood Trail passed at the mouth of the canyon, and there was a stage station with fresh water and horses. The canyon got its name after that station's barn.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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A knife from Outlaw Forge.
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