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Spurs and the Great West

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indy1919a4
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#751 Post by indy1919a4 » Sun Oct 28, 2018 11:42 am

John Dahner must have been one of the hardest working men of Hollywood... On Radio his voice is on so many radio shows, Gerold Mohr & Paul frees get alot of the omnipresent credits in Radio but they were not in movies and TV like John Dehner.. And then in the Cowboy Genre we would be lost men in the 1950s and 60s without him..

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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#752 Post by nrobertb » Sun Oct 28, 2018 12:34 pm

Great western character actors: Paul Fix.

Paul Fix, the well-known movie and TV character actor who played "Marshal Micah Torrance" on the TV series The Rifleman (1958), was born Peter Paul Fix on March 13, 1901 in Dobbs Ferry, New York to brew-master Wilhelm Fix and his wife, the former Louise C. Walz. His mother and father were German immigrants who had left their Black Forest home and arrived in New York City in the 1870s.

He first tread the boards as an actor while a sailor stationed in Newport, when the baby-faced salt (who looked much younger than his age) was one of six gobs chosen to play female roles in the Navy Relief Show "HMS Pinafore". The Navy staging of the Gilbert and Sullivan operetta was a big hit and chalked up a run of several weeks in Providence and Boston.

Fix was assigned as an able-bodied seaman to the troopship U.S.S. Mount Vernon, which was torpedoed by a German U-boat off the coast of France but did not sink as it was run aground. The rest of Fix's naval career was less exciting, and he was demobilized on September 5, 1919.

Paul Fix had one of his earliest acting roles on celluloid in the mid-1920s, appearing in a silent Western starring William S. Hart. The Western genre eventually would become the one he was most identified with. He played uncredited bit parts and small roles in silents before getting his first credited role in an early talkie.

Paul Fix would appear with another Western legend, John Wayne, in 26 films, starting in 1931 with Three Girls Lost (1931). Urged on by Loretta Young, Fix became an acting coach for the young actor, and Wayne later paid him back when he became a star by having Fix appear in his movies. (The Duke also was a part of the close-knit group that collected around John Ford). With the Duke's patronage, the kinds of roles that Fix played changed. He had been typed as villains in the 1930s but, in the 40s, he began assaying a better class of character.

His favorites parts included playing the stricken passenger in the John Wayne picture The High and the Mighty (1954), Elizabeth Taylor's father in George Stevens' classic Giant (1956), the grandfather of the eponymous The Bad Seed (1956) and the judge in To Kill a Mockingbird (1962). His last screen appearance was in the Brooke Shields movie Wanda Nevada (1979), but he is most famous for appearing in the recurring role of "Marshal Micah Torrance" in the popular Western TV series The Rifleman (1958). As of 1981, the 80-year old Fix was still getting mail from all over the world from "Rifleman" fans.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#753 Post by nrobertb » Sun Oct 28, 2018 11:29 pm

Great western character actors: Anthony Zerbe

Hailing from Long Beach, California, talented character actor Anthony Zerbe has kept busy in Hollywood and on stage since the late 1960s, often playing villainous or untrustworthy characters, with his narrow gaze and unsettling smirk. Zerbe was born May 20, 1936 in Long Beach, and served a stint in the United States Air Force before heading off to New York to study drama under noted acting coach Stella Adler. He made his screen debut as Dutchie, one of Charlton Heston's fellow cowhands in the western Will Penny (1967), played a miner in The Molly Maguires (1970), was a post-apocalyptic, lunatic messiah in The Omega Man (1971), hustled a naive Paul Newman in The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean (1972), played a leper colony leader in Papillon (1973) and a former lawman gone bad in Rooster Cogburn (1975).

Zerbe also starred alongside David Janssen in the television series Harry O (1973) as the urbane, nattily dressed Lieutenant K.C. Trench, Janssen's sometime nemesis, for which he picked up an Emmy Award. Definitely in strong demand for sinister roles, Zerbe played a crazed scientist in the corny Kiss Meets the Phantom of the Park (1978), was an arrogant father in The Dead Zone (1983), made a great General Ulysses S. Grant in North and South, Book II (1986), starred in the military drama Opposing Force (1986) and suffered a grisly demise in an airlock full of money in the James Bond thriller Licence to Kill (1989). Most recently, Zerbe has been seen as Councillor Hamann in The Matrix Reloaded (2003) and The Matrix Revolutions (2003).
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#754 Post by nrobertb » Mon Oct 29, 2018 10:19 am

Great western character actors: George Macready

Macready was born in Providence, Rhode Island, and graduated from the local Classical High School (1917) and, in 1921, from Brown University, where he was a member of Delta Phi fraternity and won a letter as the football team manager. While in college, Macready was injured in an accident in a Model T Ford. He sustained a permanent scar on his right cheek, having been thrust through the windshield while traveling on an icy road when the vehicle skidded and hit a telephone pole. He was stitched up by a veterinarian, but he caught scarlet fever during the ordeal. The injury, along with his high brow and perfect diction, gave Macready the Gothic look of an authoritarian or villainous character.

Macready first worked in a bank in Providence and was then briefly a newspaperman in New York City before he turned to stage acting. He claimed to have been descended from the 19th century Shakespearean actor William Macready.

He made his Broadway debut in 1926 in a stage adaptation of The Scarlet Letter. Through 1958, he appeared in fifteen plays, both drama and comedy, including The Barretts of Wimpole Street, based on the family of the English poet Elizabeth Barrett Browning.

His first film was Commandos Strike at Dawn (1942), which stars Paul Muni. As Ballin Mundson in Gilda (1946),

He appeared in many western television series, including Bat Masterson, Bonanza, The Dakotas, Gunsmoke, Have Gun - Will Travel, The Rebel (once in the role of Confederate General Robert E. Lee), The Rifleman, Lancer, Riverboat, The Rough Riders, Chill Wills's Frontier Circus, Rory Calhoun's The Texan, and Steve McQueen's Wanted: Dead or Alive.

On December 5, 1961, he played a Colonel John Barrington in the episode "Handful of Fire" of NBC's Laramie western series.

In addition to westerns, Macready appeared on The Outer Limits, Boris Karloff's Thriller, Get Smart with Don Adams and The Man from U.N.C.L.E. with Robert Vaughn.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#755 Post by nrobertb » Mon Oct 29, 2018 4:49 pm

The Colt Paterson is a revolver. It was the first commercial repeating firearm employing a revolving cylinder with multiple chambers aligned with a single, stationary barrel. Its design was patented by Samuel Colt on February 25, 1836, in the United States, France, and England, and it derived its name from being produced in Paterson, New Jersey. Initially this 5-shot revolver was produced in .28 caliber, with a .36 caliber model following a year later. As originally designed and produced, no loading lever was included with the revolver; a user had to disassemble the revolver partially to re-load it. Starting in 1839, however, a reloading lever and a capping window were incorporated into the design, allowing reloading without requiring partial disassembly of the revolver. This loading lever and capping window design change was also incorporated after the fact into most Colt Paterson revolvers that had been produced from 1836 until 1839. Unlike later revolvers, a folding trigger was incorporated into the Colt Paterson. The trigger only became visible upon cocking the hammer.

A subsequent patent renewal in 1849, and aggressive litigation against infringements, gave Colt a domestic monopoly on revolver development until the middle 1850s.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#756 Post by nrobertb » Tue Oct 30, 2018 10:21 am

The 1847 Colt Walker was the largest and most powerful black powder repeating handgun ever made. It was created in the mid-1840s in a collaboration between Texas Ranger Captain Samuel Hamilton Walker (1817–47) and American firearms inventor Samuel Colt (1814–62), building upon the earlier Colt Paterson design. Walker wanted a handgun that was extremely powerful at close range.

Samuel Walker carried two of his namesake revolvers in the Mexican–American War. He was killed in battle the same year his famous handgun was invented, 1847, shortly after he had received them. Only 1100 of these guns were originally made, 1000 as part of a military contract and an additional 100 for the civilian market, making original Colt Walker revolvers extremely rare and expensive to acquire. On October 9, 2008, one specimen that had been handed down from a Mexican War veteran was sold at auction for US$920,000.

The Republic of Texas had been the major purchaser of the early Paterson Holster Pistol (No. 5 model), a five shot cal .36 revolver, and Samuel Walker became familiar with it during his service as a Texas Ranger. In 1847, Walker was engaged in the Mexican-American War as a captain in the United States Mounted Rifles. He approached Colt, requesting a large revolver to replace the single-shot Aston Johnson holster pistols then in use. The desired .44-.45 caliber revolver would be carried in saddle mounted holsters and would be large enough to dispatch horses as well as enemy soldiers. The Colt Walker was used in the Mexican-American War and on the Texas frontier.

Medical officer John "Rip" Ford took a special interest in the Walkers when they arrived at Veracruz. He obtained two examples for himself and is the primary source for information about their performance during the war and afterward. His observation that the revolver would carry as far and strike with the same or greater force than the .54 caliber Mississippi Rifle seems to have been based on a single observation of a Mexican soldier hit at a distance of well over one hundred yards. The Walker, unlike most succeeding martial pistols and revolvers, was a practical weapon out to about 100 yards.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#757 Post by nrobertb » Tue Oct 30, 2018 7:08 pm

Martha Jane Canary or Cannary (May 1, 1852 – August 1, 1903), better known as Calamity Jane, was an American frontierswoman and professional scout known for being an acquaintance of Wild Bill Hickok and fighting against Indians. Late in her life, she appeared in Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show and at the 1901 Pan-American Exposition. She is said to have exhibited compassion to others, especially to the sick and needy. This facet of her character contrasted with her daredevil ways and helped to make her a noted frontier figure. She was also known for her habit of wearing men's attire. Much of what she claimed to have witnessed and participated in cannot be proven. It is known that she had no formal education and was an itinerant alcoholic.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#758 Post by nrobertb » Wed Oct 31, 2018 9:56 am

Spencer Repeating Rifle

The Spencer Repeating Rifles and Carbines were early American lever action firearms invented by Christopher Spencer. The Spencer was the world's first military metallic cartridge repeating rifle, and over 200,000 examples were manufactured in the United States by the Spencer Repeating Rifle Co. and Burnside Rifle Co. between 1860 and 1869. The Spencer repeating rifle was adopted by the Union Army, especially by the cavalry, during the American Civil War but did not replace the standard issue muzzle-loading rifled muskets in use at the time. Among the early users was George Armstrong Custer. The Spencer carbine was a shorter and lighter version designed for the cavalry.

The design for a magazine-fed, lever-operated rifle chambered for the .56-56 Spencer rimfire cartridge was completed by Christopher Spencer in 1860. Called the Spencer Repeating Rifle, it was fired by cocking a lever to extract a used case and feed a new cartridge from a tube in the buttstock. Like most firearms of the time, the hammer had to be manually cocked after each round in a separate action before the weapon could be fired. The weapon used copper rimfire cartridges, based on the 1854 Smith & Wesson patent, stored in a seven-round tube magazine. A spring in the tube enabled the rounds to be fired one after another. When empty, the spring had to be released and removed before dropping in fresh cartridges, then replaced before resuming firing. Rounds could be loaded individually or from a device called the Blakeslee Cartridge Box, which contained up to thirteen (also six and ten) tubes with seven cartridges each, which could be emptied into the magazine tube in the buttstock.

Unlike later cartridge designations, the .56-56 Spencer's first number referred to the diameter of the case just ahead of the rim, the second number the case diameter at the mouth; the actual bullet diameter was .52 inches. Cartridges were loaded with 45 grains (2.9 g) of black powder, and were also available as .56-52, .56-50, and a wildcat .56-46, a necked down version of the original .56-56. Cartridge length was limited by the action size to about 1.75 inches; later calibers used a smaller diameter, lighter bullet and larger powder charge to increase power and range over the original .56-56 cartridge, which was almost as powerful as the .58 caliber rifled musket of the time but under-powered by the standards of other early cartridges such as the .50–70 and .45-70.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#759 Post by nrobertb » Wed Oct 31, 2018 7:46 pm

In 1960 while studying geology in the Black Hills of South Dakota, I ran into a bearded old prospector who was eking out a living selling a brochure about his life story. I always thought he was Potato Creek Johnny, but now I see that Johnny died in 1943. I wonder who I met?

One of Deadwood’s most colorful characters, John Perrett, more often referred to as “Potato Creek Johnny,” is credited with finding one of the world’s largest gold nuggets. Though many say the nugget was actually several nuggets melted together, the tale persists, along with stories of Perrett’s other eccentricities.

Hailing from across the pond in Wales, Perrett immigrated to the United States in 1883 when he was just 17 and before long had made his way to Deadwood, South Dakota to seek his fortune.

The impish, just over four-foot man, first worked a variety of odd jobs when he came to the area. However, by the time he reached 25, he decided to set out on his own in order to find gold. Though by this time, most of the gold was being hauled out of the hills by large mining companies, Perrett was not deterred and soon headed out with his gold pan. Also using sluice boxes, he was determined to find yet another mother lode in the streams around the Northern Hills.

Working a claim on Potato Creek, an offshoot of Spearfish Creek, Perrett let his hair and beard grow so long that he had the appearance of the “typical” prospector and soon earned the moniker “Potato Creek Johnny.”

The very next year Johnny made history when he allegedly found the large gold nugget. Though almost immediately, locals said that the nugget was actually a melted mass of gold that Perrett had stolen from a neighboring miner, the nugget, if not bringing Perrett riches, at least brought him fame. The claim of it being a stolen melted mass has never been substantiated.

Perrett sold the leg-shaped nugget, weighing in at 7 ¾ troy ounces, to W.E. Adams for $250, who then turned around and put it on display at the Adams Museum. Immediately, not only did the gold nugget become a tourist attraction but so did Potato Creek Johnny himself, as Deadwood visitors wanted to hear his stories.

As visitors came to his cabin in the 1930’s and early 1940’s, Johnny would entertain them with prospecting tales and stories of Deadwood while they watched him pan for gold. When asked about the nugget, he would often reply, “I have been looking for the rest of the leg ever since”. Perrett also was involved in several community activities and often took part in the local parades.

Potato Creek Johnny continued to “promote” Deadwood until the day he died at the age of 77 in February 1943.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#760 Post by nrobertb » Thu Nov 01, 2018 10:13 am

Another pair of spurs.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#761 Post by nrobertb » Thu Nov 01, 2018 3:16 pm

Spurs aren't the only thing given out as rodeo awards. Saddles are a frequent award.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#762 Post by nrobertb » Fri Nov 02, 2018 10:37 am

A group of spurs.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#763 Post by nrobertb » Fri Nov 02, 2018 3:41 pm

The Remington Rolling Block rifle is a breech-loading rifle that was produced from the mid-1860s into the early 20th century by E. Remington and Sons (later Remington Arms Company). The action was extremely strong, and could easily withstand the increased pressure of the new smokeless powders coming into use by the late 1880s.

It was made in a variety of calibers, both rimfire and centerfire, including the 12.17x42 mm rimfire, 12.17x44 mm rimfire and 12.17x44 mm rimmed centerfire Swedish and Norwegian cartridges, .43 Spanish (11.15x58mmR), .50-70, .40-70, .45-70, and later in .22 caliber. Later models were produced in .30-06 Springfield, 7×57mm Mauser, and 8×50mmR Lebel.

In 12.17x42mmRF and 12.18x44mmRF (two cartridges that were interchangeable), and towards the end of its service life also 8x58mmR Danish Krag centerfire, it served as the standard service rifle of the Swedish Army from 1867 to the mid-1890s (when it was replaced by the Swedish Mauser) and in Norway as the standard service rifle from 1867 to the mid-1880s (when it was replaced by the M1884 Jarmann). In .43 Spanish it was the chief service arm of the Spanish Army from 1870–1893, and was used by reserve and militia forces for many years thereafter. Many Rolling Block rifles were used by Argentina before being replaced in 1891 by the new 7.65mm Mauser, and were also widely used by Egypt and Mexico. During the Franco-Prussian War, France acquired 210,000 Rolling Block rifles to make up for a shortage of the standard-issue Chassepot.

Along with the Sharps rifle it was one of two rifles probably used more than any other by the buffalo hunters who hunted the American bison herds in the 1870s and 1880s.

Civilian Remington rolling block rifles, and later surplus military rifles, became very popular among hunters in Scandinavia, particularly for moose hunting, with ammunition for the rifles being commonly available on the civilian market into the 1920s-1930s.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#764 Post by nrobertb » Fri Nov 02, 2018 10:44 pm

A collection of knives by ArtFire.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#765 Post by nrobertb » Sat Nov 03, 2018 10:57 am

The Colt Model 1848 Percussion Army Revolver is a .44 caliber revolver designed by Samuel Colt for the U.S. Army's Regiment of Mounted Rifles. The revolver was also issued to the Army's "Dragoon" Regiments. This revolver was designed as a solution to numerous problems encountered with the Colt Walker. Although it was introduced after the Mexican-American War, it became popular among civilians during the 1850s and 1860s, and was also used during the American Civil War.

The Colt Dragoon Revolver was produced with several variations between 1847 and 1860, when the Colt Model 1860 revolver replaced it. All the improvements in design of Colt revolvers were applied to the Dragoons as well to the smaller models of Colt revolvers. Total production of Colt Dragoons including the 1,100 Walkers, from 1847 to 1860: 19,800; plus 750 Dragoons in a separate number range for the British market. For collectors, there are three different types with one "transition" model.
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