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Spurs and the Great West

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nrobertb
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#661 Post by nrobertb » Tue Aug 21, 2018 10:58 pm

Cowboy G-Men, which ran on TV from 1952-53, has to be the dumbest name ever hung on a western series.

Pat Gallagher and his sidekick Stoney Crockett are Secret Service agents in the Old West, dispatched by the government to investigate crimes threatening the young nation.

Stars: Russell Hayden (creator of the previously mentioned Pioneertown), and Jackie Coogan, who got started long ago in Charlie Chaplin films.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#662 Post by nrobertb » Wed Aug 22, 2018 9:29 pm

A pair of spurs by Hanley.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#663 Post by nrobertb » Thu Aug 23, 2018 10:10 am

Boots and Saddles ran on TV in 1957-58. Captain Shanks Adams is in charge of the real Ft. Lowell in this syndicated fictional series. Set in the dangerous Arizona territory, Adams combats all sorts of trials assisted by his scout Luke Cummings and Lt. Binning.

John Pickard and Dave Willock starred.

The western fort set used on the series was in Kanab, Utah, and was originally built for the western Pony Express (1953). It was also seen in the opening credits of TV's Branded (1965) and was featured extensively in Duel at Diablo (1966).

The unit depicted in the series, the 5th Cavalry, was an actual regiment in the US army. It fought in the Mexican War and the US Civil War and afterwards served in the Indian campaigns in Nebraska and Kansas. Among its members were future Confederate General Robert E. Lee (who was a lieutenant colonel at the time) and William F. Cody, better known as "Buffalo Bill Cody", who served as a scout.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#664 Post by nrobertb » Thu Aug 23, 2018 6:54 pm

A nice pair of drop shank spurs.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#665 Post by nrobertb » Fri Aug 24, 2018 11:07 am

\Fort Lowell was a United States Army post active from 1873 to 1891 on the outskirts of Tucson, Arizona. Fort Lowell was the successor to Camp Lowell, an earlier Army installation. The Army chose a location just south of the confluence of the Tanque Verde and Pantano creeks, at the point where they form the Rialto River, due to the year-round supply of water during that period. The Army claimed a military reservation that encompassed approximately eighty square miles and extended east toward the Rincon Mountains.

The Post of Tucson was established May 20, 1862, after the California Column drove Confederate forces from the area. The post was abandoned in July 1864 and reestablished in July 1865. On August 29, 1866 the post was renamed Camp Lowell in honor of General Charles Russell Lowell, who died from wounds sustained during the Battle of Cedar Creek. Initially located on the east side of Sixth Avenue, between Twelfth and Fourteenth Streets, the post was moved for sanitary reasons to a location about 7 miles east of town on March 31, 1873. The post's name was changed to Fort Lowell on April 5, 1879.

The fort played a pivotal role during the Apache Wars, providing additional protection for the Tucson area. Far too large and well-manned to be attacked directly, Fort Lowell provided supplies and manpower for outlying military installations. During its eighteen years of operation, the fort averaged thirteen officers and 239 enlisted men. Among the units present during this period were the 2nd, 4th, 5th and 6th Cavalry Regiments, as well as the 1st, 8th, and 12th Infantry Regiments.

The orientation of the post was set according to magnetic north. It featured a large parade grounds, officers' quarters, quartermaster and commissary storehouses, corrals, quarters for enlisted men as well as for married non-commissioned officers. The most prominent building on post was the hospital, the adobe remnants of which still stand under a protective structure. A lane lined with cottonwood trees, aptly named Cottonwood Lane, graced the area in front of the officers' houses.

Among the more well known officers to have served at Fort Lowell were the young Walter Reed, the Army physician famous for his yellow fever research, and Charles Bendire, the amateur ornithologist after whom Bendire's thrasher is named.

Fort Lowell is the historical setting of the 1957-1958 syndicated Western television series, Boots and Saddles, starring John Pickard, Patrick McVey, and Gardner McKay.

A reconstructed Fort Lowell was featured in the 1972 film Ulzana's Raid, starring Burt Lancaster. However, the reconstructed fort was actually built in an area just southwest of the Santa Rita Mountains, near Nogales, Arizona.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#666 Post by nrobertb » Fri Aug 24, 2018 5:48 pm

Brave Eagle ran on TV from 1955-56.
Reflecting the Native American viewpoint in the settlement of the American West, This was the first series where an American Indian was the lead character.

Starring were Keith Larsen, Anthony Numkena, Kim Winona. Ironically, Larsen was not Indian.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#667 Post by nrobertb » Sat Aug 25, 2018 10:29 am

A pair of spurs by August Buermann.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#668 Post by indy1919a4 » Sat Aug 25, 2018 11:29 am

Moore's Civil War Era 32 caliber Rimfire

Nice Design, With the 1st swing out cylinder. Violated Smith & Wessons patent at the time. But one was carried by Sheriff Grayson when he brought in Tom Dooley (Dola) for the murder of Laura Foster. Memorialized in the Kingston trio song. Where as according to lore Sheriff Grayson arrested Dola with a rock.. He did use the pistol to save Tom Dola from a lynching.

Song:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jP_vynIOxOU

Pistol youtube
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OoIMw5oF_W0
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#669 Post by nrobertb » Sat Aug 25, 2018 10:28 pm

Buckskin was a TV series that ran from 1958-59. Annie O'Connell's boarding house in Buckskin, Montana, in 1880, is the setting for dramas unfolding for travelers and townies alike. Stories are seen through the eyes of 10-year-old Jody.

Tom Nolan and Sally Brophy starred.

This show was one of the rarest of rarities - a summer replacement series that proved so popular it was picked up the following year to replace one of the fall season's first casualties, with new episodes being filmed. It actually had an extremely long run, despite the fact that only 39 episodes (ordinarily a single season) were shot, because it could be played either as an evening western or as a kiddie show on Saturday morning. This had to do with an interesting innovation - whereas most westerns (ever since the classic movie SHANE) had a little boy in a supporting role, this was the first TV series to actually tell the story of the old west from a child's point of view. Luckily, they had a fine young actor in Tommy Nolan, who lived in the small town of Buckskin with his Mom. As she ran a boarding house, all sorts of odd and interesting characters passed by, and each of their story's was depicted as to its impact on the child as he gradually grew up. In a way, it resembled the original LASSIE (with Jeff, not Timmy), only shifted back in time and taken from the midwest to the north west. And without Lassie, of course. There was a solid, decent town marshal, but again, we only saw him as the child saw him. There was a warmth to this show that was missing from many of the other TV westerns of that time. And while it never made a big splash, it does hold a nice nostalgic place in the memories of those who remember catching it.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#670 Post by nrobertb » Sun Aug 26, 2018 8:51 am

Multnomah Falls is a waterfall located in the Columbia River Gorge, east of Troutdale, between Corbett and Dodson, Oregon, United States. The waterfall is accessible from the Historic Columbia River Highway and Interstate 84. Spanning two tiers on basalt cliffs, it is the tallest waterfall in the state of Oregon at 620 ft. in height.

The land surrounding the falls was developed by Simon Benson in the early-twentieth century, with a pathway, viewing bridge, and adjacent lodge being constructed in 1925. The Multnomah Falls Lodge and the surrounding footpaths at the falls were added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1981. Contemporarily, the state of Oregon maintains a switchback trail that ascends to a talus slope 100 feet above the falls, and descends to an observation deck that overlooks the falls' edge. The falls attract over two million visitors each year, making it the most-visited natural recreation site in the U.S. Pacific Northwest.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#671 Post by nrobertb » Sun Aug 26, 2018 8:47 pm

Santa Clara Pueblo is a census-designated place in Rio Arriba County, New Mexico, United States and a federally recognized tribe of Native American Pueblo people. Santa Clara Pueblo was established about 1550.

The pueblo is a member of the Eight Northern Pueblos, and the people are from the Tewa ethnic group of Native Americans who speak the Tewa language. The pueblo is on the Rio Grande, between Ohkay Owingeh (formerly San Juan Pueblo) to the north and San Ildefonso Pueblo to the south. Santa Clara Pueblo is famous for producing hand-crafted pottery, specifically blackware and redware with deep engravings. The pueblo is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The 2010 census found that 1,018 people lived here, while 1,182 people in the United States reported being exclusively Santa Claran and 1,425 people reported being Santa Claran exclusively or in combination with another group.

Pueblo peoples lived in the area for millennia before they met Juan de Oñate and his exploration party on July 11, 1598. Pueblo archaeology shows that Ancient Pueblo Peoples lived in the general region as far back as 1200BC.

First visited in 1541, a segment of Francisco Vásquez de Coronado's expeditionary force met with the residents of the nearby Caypa pueblo. After annexation of the region into the Spanish Kingdom, and as part of the 1601 expansion of Oñate's colonial capital, a chapel was built there by 1617. Fray Alonso de Benavides established a mission in 1628.

History shows that the mission was abandoned on the lead up to the revolt. The pueblo would join forces with others and would fight against the Spanish royal government in 1680 in the Great Pueblo Revolt. The original and unoccupied chapel was destroyed. Two other chapel buildings would be constructed there. The current church replaced the former in 1918. In 1782, a small pox outbreak decimated the population.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#672 Post by nrobertb » Mon Aug 27, 2018 1:24 pm

The Californians ran on TV from 1957-59. San Franciscans during the goldrush of the 1850s attempt to maintain law and order in their wild city. Newly arrived Matthew Wayne becomes sheriff, then marshal, and organizes the city police force while expressing interest in the young widow Fanzler and sparring with attorney Pitt.

Starring were Richard Coogan, Sean McClory, Adam Kennedy.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#673 Post by nrobertb » Mon Aug 27, 2018 11:15 pm

Devil's Sinkhole State Natural Area is a natural bat habitat near the city of Rocksprings in Edwards County in the U.S. state of Texas. Home to the Mexican free-tailed bat, access to the area is available only through advanced reservations.

The Devil's Sinkhole is a vertical natural bat habitat. The 40 by 60 feet opening drops down to reveal a cavern some 400 feet below. The cavern was first discovered by local residents in 1876. H. S. Barber carved his name inside the cave in 1889. The area was transferred to the state of Texas in 1985, and open to the public in 1992. Carved by water erosion, the cavern is home to several million Mexican free-tailed bats who emerge at sunset during April through October.

This site was popular with vertical cavers when I was working at Carlsbad Caverns in the late 1960's. A college girl had climbed all the way out and was just at the lip when something went wrong and she fell to her death.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#674 Post by nrobertb » Tue Aug 28, 2018 12:07 pm

Here's a pair of spurs with sombrero etching.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#675 Post by nrobertb » Tue Aug 28, 2018 5:17 pm

Some of the early westerns seem in retrospect to be pretty cheesy. Action In The Afternoon, 1953-54 was one such. It was filmed in Philadelphia. Singing cowboy Jack Valentine rode the range in Huberle, Montana with the sheriff; Kate, the editor and publisher of the newspaper; and Ozzie, Jack's dense partner.

Barry Cassell, Harriss Forrest, Jack Valentine starred. I haven't been able to find a good picture of this show.

The coroner's long frock coat used by John Zacherle began the development of one of the best-known characters of the 1960s, "Zacherley", the "Cool Ghoul".

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