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Spurs and the Great West

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indy1919a4
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#541 Post by indy1919a4 » Wed Jul 04, 2018 11:17 pm


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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#542 Post by nrobertb » Thu Jul 05, 2018 9:58 am

Charles Marion Russell (March 19, 1864 – October 24, 1926), also known as C. M. Russell, Charlie Russell, and "Kid" Russell, was an artist of the Old American West. Russell created more than 2,000 paintings of cowboys, Indians, and landscapes set in the Western United States and in Alberta, Canada, in addition to bronze sculptures. Known as 'the cowboy artist', Russell was also a storyteller and author. The C. M. Russell Museum Complex located in Great Falls, Montana, houses more than 2,000 Russell artworks, personal objects, and artifacts. Other major collections are held at the Montana Historical Society in Helena, Montana, the Buffalo Bill Center of the West in Cody, Wyoming, the Amon Carter Museum of American Art in Fort Worth, Texas, and the Sid Richardson Museum in Fort Worth, Texas.

Russell's mural titled Lewis and Clark Meeting the Flathead Indians hangs in the state capitol building in Helena, Montana. Russell's 1918 painting Piegans sold for $5.6 million at a 2005 auction. The painting shown is titled "Smoke of a .45"
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#543 Post by nrobertb » Thu Jul 05, 2018 3:25 pm

Lawman ran on TV from 1958-62. This is the story of Marshal Dan Troop of Laramie, Wyoming, and his Deputy Johnny McKay, an orphan Troop took under his wing. In the second season, Lily Merrill opens The Birdcage Saloon, where she sings and entertains and has a close, unspoken relationship with Troop. It featured John Russell, Peter Brown and Peggie Castle.

Russell was a WWII hero who was in movies and other TV series such as Alias Smith and Jones. Brown also did many movies and TV roles. Castle's roles were usually in B grade dramas, action films or westerns.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#544 Post by nrobertb » Thu Jul 05, 2018 8:38 pm

Here is another railroad spike knife by J. Neilson, judge on the TV series Forged In Fire.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#545 Post by nrobertb » Fri Jul 06, 2018 12:35 am

The Adventures of Wild Bill Hickok ran on TV from 1951-58. Hickok rode Buckshot and 300-pound Jingles rode Joker. Jingles described Hickok as "the bravest, Strongest, fightingest U.S. Marshal in the whole West." And that's about it: he beat up all the bad guys and somehow kept his good looks. Guy Madison and Andy Devine starred.

Guy Madison appeared in 85 films, on radio, and television, finding his niche in the 1940s. In 1955, before the Hickok series ended, Devine took over the hosting job on a children's show retitled Andy's Gang (1955), in which he gained new fans among the very young.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#546 Post by nrobertb » Fri Jul 06, 2018 11:27 am

Another knife by J. Neilson.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#547 Post by nrobertb » Fri Jul 06, 2018 2:56 pm

The main evidence of ancient people in Arches National Park near Moab, Utah, is rock art or petroglyphs. These were made by pecking at the "desert varnish"
which is a mineral coating on rocks that have been exposed to arid conditions for thousands of year.

Humans have occupied the region since the last ice age 10,000 years ago. Fremont people and Ancient Pueblo People lived in the area up until about 700 years ago. Spanish missionaries encountered Ute and Paiute tribes in the area when they first came through in 1775, but the first European-Americans to attempt settlement in the area were the Mormon Elk Mountain Mission in 1855, who soon abandoned the area. Ranchers, farmers, and prospectors later settled Moab in the neighboring Riverine Valley in the 1880's.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#548 Post by nrobertb » Fri Jul 06, 2018 10:33 pm

Laredo ran on TV from 1965-67. Rustlers, bank robbers, and their own wild schemes: a band of Texas Rangers keeps getting in and out of trouble, under the jaundiced eye of Captain Parmalee. Featured were Neville Brand, Peter Brown and William Smith.

Brand was a WWII hero who played tough guys, including Elvis Presley's killer in the movie Love Me Tender. Smith had 269 roles, right up through 2014.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#549 Post by nrobertb » Sat Jul 07, 2018 2:47 pm

Another knife by J. Neilson.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#550 Post by nrobertb » Sat Jul 07, 2018 4:41 pm

It's here, and is a thing of beauty. Made in the USA, hooray! Housed in the Glen Arbor Blacksmith Shop at Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, Michigan.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#551 Post by nrobertb » Sat Jul 07, 2018 7:57 pm

Pima Baskets. The Pima Indians, Akimel O'odham, are known for their fine Indian baskets. Pima Indian basket materials are Devils Claw, willow and bear grass.
Basket forms include trays, and Ollas with both animal and human figures.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#552 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jul 08, 2018 11:12 am

One of the best of the old westerns was Maverick, which ran from 1957-62, with smart writing and classy acting by its stars, including James Garner, Jack Kelly and Roger Moore (a future James Bond!).

Bret and Bart Maverick (and in later seasons, their English cousin, Beau) are well dressed gamblers who migrate from town to town always looking for a good game. Poker (five-card draw) is their favorite but they've been known to play such odd card games as Three-toed Sloth on occasion. The show would occasionally feature both or all three Mavericks, but usually would rotate the central character from week to week. There were regular appearances by Efrem Zimbalest Jr. (soon to star in 77 Sunset Strip) as Dandy Jim Buckley and Richard Long (soon to star in The Big Valley) as Gentleman Jack Darby. Other returning guests were a who's who of TV royalty.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#553 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jul 08, 2018 7:12 pm

The Paiute People of the Great Basin are known for their basketry. Many of these Paiute Indian baskets served utilitarian purposes. Basketry forms include cradleboards, water jars, burden baskets, basketry canteens, seed jars, beaded baskets, winnowing trays, and ollas.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#554 Post by nrobertb » Mon Jul 09, 2018 12:24 pm

Another knife by J. Neilson.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#555 Post by nrobertb » Mon Jul 09, 2018 3:53 pm

The Indian Head cent, also known as an Indian Head penny, was a one-cent coin ($0.01) produced by the United States Bureau of the Mint from 1859 to 1909. It was designed by James Barton Longacre, the Chief Engraver at the Philadelphia Mint.

Mint Director James Ross Snowden selected the Indian Head design and chose a laurel wreath for the reverse that was replaced in 1860 by an oak wreath with a shield. Cents were hoarded during the economic chaos of the American Civil War when the metal nickel was in short supply. As Mint officials saw that privately issued bronze tokens were circulating, they induced Congress to pass the Coinage Act of 1864, authorizing a slimmer cent of bronze alloy.

In the postwar period, the cent became very popular and was struck in large numbers in most years. An exception was 1877 when a poor economy and little demand for cents created one of the rarest dates in the series. With the advent of coin-operated machines in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, even more cents were produced, reaching 100 million for the first time in 1907. In 1909, the Indian Head cent was replaced by the Lincoln cent, designed by Victor D. Brenner.

As late as the 1950's when I had a newspaper delivery route, I'd occasionally get one in change. Now if you find one it is probably because someone emptied a very old piggy bank or dispersed a collection.
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