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Spurs and the Great West

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nrobertb
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#511 Post by nrobertb » Thu Jun 28, 2018 1:43 pm

The Texan ran on TV from 1958-60, starring Rory Calhoun, one of the most prolific actors with 126 movie and TV roles.

The Texan, a Civil War Veteran whose reputation of being the fastest gun in the west precedes him, roams across Texas from town to town, not looking for trouble, but trouble finds him.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#512 Post by nrobertb » Thu Jun 28, 2018 6:32 pm

Tumacacori is the site of Mission San José de Tumacácori a Franciscan mission that was built in the late 18th century. It takes its name from an earlier mission site founded by Father Eusebio Kino in 1691, which is on the east side of the Santa Cruz River south of the national park. This Kino-period mission was founded at an extant native O'odham or Sobaipuri settlement and represents the first mission in southern Arizona, but not the first mission in Arizona. The remains of the native settlement are still extant and have been investigated and reported on by archaeologist Deni Seymour.

The later Franciscan mission, which is now a ruin preserved as Tumacácori National Historical Park, was never rebuilt after being abandoned after repeated Apache raids in the 19th century that killed farmers and ranchers in the area and put a stop to the growth of the area's economy. Nearby Tubac was besieged in 1861.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#513 Post by nrobertb » Fri Jun 29, 2018 12:01 am

Hotel de Paree ran on TV in 1959-60, featuring Earl Holliman, Jeanette Nolan and Strother Martin, all of whom had lengthy acting careers. Martin had 175 roles and is probably best remembered for the movie The Wild Bunch. Nolan had an incredible 201 credits.

Sundance, a reformed gunslinger just released from prison, drifts into the town of Georgetown, Colorado. A tangle with the town villain ends up with Sundance being forced to shoot him, resulting in his being made town Marshal. He takes a shine to two French sisters who own the town's most elegant hotel, The Hotel de Paree, especially the young, pretty one.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#514 Post by nrobertb » Fri Jun 29, 2018 2:17 pm

I think Blue Ape has a nice line of knives. Here's another of theirs.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#515 Post by nrobertb » Fri Jun 29, 2018 9:56 pm

The Adventures of Kit Carson ran on TV from 1951-55. Kit and his pal El Toro go all over the west securing justice for all (absolutely no connection with the historical character).

Bill Williams was Kit and Don Diamond was El Toro. Bill was in many B movies and other TV shows. Don was later in the comedy series F Troop.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#516 Post by nrobertb » Sat Jun 30, 2018 5:35 pm

A knife by Winchester, with buffalo horn.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#517 Post by nrobertb » Sat Jun 30, 2018 10:22 pm

Tuzigoot National Monument preserves a 2- to 3-story pueblo ruin on the summit of a limestone and sandstone ridge just east of Clarkdale, Arizona, 120 feet above the Verde River floodplain. The Tuzigoot Site is an elongated complex of stone masonry rooms that were built along the spine of a natural outcrop in the Verde Valley. The central rooms stand higher than the others and they appear to have served public functions. The pueblo has 110 rooms. The National Park Service currently administers 58 acres within an authorized boundary of 834 acres.

Tuzigoot is Apache for "crooked water," from nearby Pecks Lake, a cutoff meander of the Verde River. The pueblo was built by the Sinagua people between 1125 and 1400 CE. Tuzigoot is the largest and best preserved of the many Sinagua pueblo ruins in the Verde Valley. The ruins at Tuzigoot incorporate very few doors; instead, the inhabitants used ladders accessed by trapdoor type openings in the roofs to enter each room.

At this site, remains of pithouses can be seen as well as petroglyphs, although the petroglyphs can be viewed only on certain days of the week.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#518 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jul 01, 2018 10:15 am

Here's a Bramley Custom knife.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#519 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jul 01, 2018 10:50 am

F Troop ran from 1965-67 and was basically a comic western. It was the misadventures of the staff and neighbors of a remote U.S. Army outpost in the Wild West. Featured were Forrest Tucker, Larry Storch and Ken Berry. All had long careers. Storch, who played wisecracking street guys, had an incredible 238 parts, mostly in TV. Tucker, who played tough guys, was in many movies before shifting to TV. Berry may be best remembered for Mayberry RFD, where he replaced Andy Griffith as the lead.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#520 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jul 01, 2018 5:59 pm

Here is a knife by Renegade.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#521 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jul 01, 2018 6:07 pm

Steve Donovan, Western Marshall ran on TV from 1955-56. A tall, powerfully built man, Douglas Kennedy entered films after graduating from Amherst. Making his debut in 1940, he appeared in many westerns and detective thrillers, often as a villain. World War II interrupted his career, and he spent the war years as a Signal Corps officer and an operative in the OSS and US Army Intelligence. After the war he returned to Hollywood, where he began playing supporting roles in larger films and an occasional lead in a lower-budget film. He is most fondly remembered, though, by audiences of the 1950s for two roles: his western TV series Steve Donovan, Western Marshal (1955), and as one of the policemen taken over by the Martians in the sci-fi classic Invaders from Mars (1953).
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#522 Post by nrobertb » Mon Jul 02, 2018 9:36 am

Puerco Ruin and Petroglyphs are the ruins of a large Indian pueblo, which reached its peak around 1300 A.D., containing over 100 rooms. It is the largest known archeological site within the Petrified Forest National Park.

The site had two periods of occupation, each lasting about one century: from 1100-1200 and 1300-1400. The Ancestral Puebloans
used the flood plain of the Puerco River to cultivate corn, beans, and squash. They also made baskets and colored pottery. The settlement had contact with both the Hopi people to the west and the Mogollon people to north. The second, and largest, period of occupation occurred during the 1300s, after a series of droughts in the area the indigenous people moved from small scattered communities to larger pueblo dwellings. By the late 1300s, climatic changes occurred which caused the inhabitants to abandon the location, and it was deserted by 1380.

The pueblo was built out of hand-hewn sandstone blocks in a rectangular shape, surrounding an interior plaza. The single story consisted of rooms used as living quarters and storage areas. Kivas, where ceremonies took place, were also present underground. The exterior walls of the pueblo contained no windows or doors, entry was accomplished by ladders over the walls.

The site contains over 800 petroglyphs, incised on more than 100 boulders. One of the petroglyphs which has been uncovered at the site appears to show the migration path from the Puerco Pueblo to the Crack-in-the-Rock site, today located within the Wupatki National Monument, dating from approximately 1150 A.D.

Between 1988 and 1989 a group of archeologists from the Western Archeological and Conservation Center conducted excavations of the site. They also recorded over 1,000 pieces of rock art on the site. 8 non-room subsurface features, 4 surface rooms, and a kiva were excavated. More than 4,000 potsherds, 26,000 flaked stone artifacts, and numerous floral and faunal remains were catalogued. The artifacts uncovered indicate trade with the Hopi, Homol'ovi, Flagstaff, Zuni, and Gallup settlements, although many items were made from local raw materials.

A petroglyph which marks the summer equinox has been found at the site. For approximately two weeks around the equinox, there is an interplay between the sun's rays and shadows across its circular design at sunrise.

While the historical record shows that over 90% of the local fauna was represented by small mammals such as rabbits and prairie dogs, and about 1% birds, with zero bear remains, the petroglyphs show different results, with bears being the most predominate, accounting for 21% of the petroglyphs, and birds making up 16%.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#523 Post by nrobertb » Mon Jul 02, 2018 12:22 pm

George Catlin was born in Wilkes-Barre, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania. As a child growing up in Pennsylvania, Catlin had spent many hours hunting, fishing, and looking for American Indian artifacts. His fascination with Native Americans was kindled by his mother, who told him stories of the western frontier and how she was captured by a tribe when she was a young girl. Years later, a group of Native Americans came through Philadelphia dressed in their colorful outfits and made quite an impression on Catlin.

Following a brief career as an attorney, Catlin produced two major collections of paintings of American Indians and published a series of books chronicling his travels among the native peoples of North, Central, and South America. Spurred by relics brought back by the famous Lewis and Clark Expedition of 1804–1806, he set out to record the appearance and customs of America’s native peoples.

Catlin began his journey in 1830 when he accompanied General William Clark on a diplomatic mission up the Mississippi River into Native American territory. St. Louis became Catlin’s base of operations for five trips he took between 1830 and 1836, eventually visiting fifty tribes. Two years later he ascended the Missouri River more than 3000 km to Fort Union Trading Post, near what is now the North Dakota-Montana border, where he spent several weeks among indigenous people who were still relatively untouched by European culture. He visited eighteen tribes, including the Pawnee, Omaha, and Ponca in the south and the Mandan, Hidatsa, Cheyenne, Crow, Assiniboine, and Blackfeet to the north. There he produced the most vivid and penetrating portraits of his career. During later trips along the Arkansas, Red, and Mississippi rivers, as well as visits to Florida and the Great Lakes, he produced more than 500 paintings and gathered a substantial collection of artifacts.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#524 Post by nrobertb » Mon Jul 02, 2018 5:10 pm

Here's a nice folding knife.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#525 Post by nrobertb » Mon Jul 02, 2018 6:03 pm

Zane Grey Theater ran on TV from 1956-61. An anthology based (earlier more so than later) on the novels and stories of Zane Grey. Dick Powell was often the star, as well as the host. Powell was a big movie star who moved into TV. In the 1930's he was one of Hollywood's top box office draws. At various times he was married to movie stars June Allyson and Joan Blondell.

Trivia: Novelist Zane Grey's real first name was Pearl, for a color his mother admired. That would get you beaten up on the playground.
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