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Re: Spurs and the Great West

Posted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 9:57 pm
by nrobertb
This is Garland's in Sedona, AZ. If I sold everything I own, I probably couldn't buy everything in that room.

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Posted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 10:26 am
by nrobertb
Canyon de Chelly National Monument was established on April 1, 1931, as a unit of the National Park Service. Located in northeastern Arizona, it is within the boundaries of the Navajo Nation and lies in the Four Corners region. Reflecting one of the longest continuously inhabited landscapes of North America, it preserves ruins of the indigenous tribes that lived in the area, from the Ancestral Puebloans (formerly known as Anasazi) to the Navajo. It is one of the most visited national monuments in the United States.

Canyon de Chelly long served as a home for Navajo people before it was invaded by forces led by future New Mexico governor Lt. Antonio Narbona in 1805. In 1863, Col. Kit Carson sent troops through the canyon, killing 23 Indians, seizing 200 sheep, and destroying hogans, as well as peach orchards and other crops. The resulting demoralization led to the surrender of the Navajos and their removal to Bosque Redondo, New Mexico.

The photos are of White House Ruin and Antelope House Ruin.

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Posted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 2:21 pm
by OLDGUNNER
DSC_0001.JPG
Well this is out west and a fixer-upper RV down the road.

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Posted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 4:25 pm
by nrobertb
If you are prospecting for turquoise, this is what to look for.

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Posted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 11:17 pm
by nrobertb
The Klagetoh and Ganado trading posts aren't far apart. so it is natural that their rug styles are similar. The main difference is that the backgrounds of the Klagetoh rugs are usually grey rather than red.

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Posted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 9:44 am
by nrobertb
Bandelier National Monument is near Los Alamos, New Mexico. The monument preserves the homes and territory of the Ancestral Puebloans of a later era in the Southwest. Most of the pueblo structures date to two eras, dating between 1150 and 1600 AD.

Much of the area was covered with volcanic ash from an eruption of the Valles Caldera volcano 1.14 million years ago. The volcanic outflow varied in hardness; the Ancestral Puebloans broke up the firmer materials to use as bricks, while they carved out dwellings from the softer material.

Human presence in the area has been dated to over 10,000 years before present. Permanent settlements by ancestors of the Puebloan peoples have been dated to 1150 CE; these settlers had moved closer to the Rio Grande by 1550. The distribution of basalt and obsidian artifacts from the area, along with other traded goods, rock markings, and construction techniques, indicate that its inhabitants were part of a regional trade network that included what is now Mexico.

Frijoles Canyon contains a number of ancestral pueblo homes, kivas (ceremonial structures), rock paintings, and petroglyphs. Some of the dwellings were rock structures built on the canyon floor; others were cavities in the volcanic tuff of the canyon wall carved out further by humans.

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Posted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 3:33 pm
by nrobertb
Along with Crystal, Wide Ruins Trading Post is a center for vegetal dyed rugs. They are borderless and combine white and grey with soft pastel colors. Panel designs are simplified forms of arrows, chevrons and squash blossoms.

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Posted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 7:33 pm
by nrobertb
HERE IS A KNIFE WITH LEATHER SPACERS HANDLE, BY ROCKING H.

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Posted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 9:00 am
by nrobertb
A knife by Perkin.

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Posted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 8:07 pm
by nrobertb
Wupatki National Monument is located in north-central Arizona, near Flagstaff. It is administered by the National Park Service in close conjunction with the nearby Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument.

The many settlement sites scattered throughout the monument were built by the Ancient Pueblo People. Wupatki was first inhabited around 500 AD. and is a multistory Sinagua pueblo dwelling comprising over 100 rooms and a community room and ball court, making it the largest building for nearly 50 miles. Nearby secondary structures have also been uncovered, including two kiva-like structures. A major population influx began soon after the eruption of Sunset Crater in the 11th century (between 1040 and 1100), which blanketed the area with volcanic ash; this improved agricultural productivity and the soil's ability to retain water. By 1182, approximately 85 to 100 people lived at Wupatki Pueblo but by 1225, the site was permanently abandoned. Based on a careful survey of archaeological sites conducted in the 1980s, an estimated 2000 immigrants moved into the area during the century following the eruption. Agriculture was based mainly on maize and squash raised from the arid land without irrigation. In the Wupatki site, the residents harvested rainwater due to the rarity of springs.

Held together with mortar, many of the walls still stand. Each settlement was constructed as a single building, sometimes with scores of rooms. The largest settlement on monument territory is the Wupatki Ruin, built around a natural rock outcropping. With over 100 rooms, this ruin is believed to be the area's tallest and largest structure for its time period. The monument also contains ruins identified as a ball court, similar to those found in Mesoamerica and in the Hohokam ruins of southern Arizona; this is the northernmost example of this kind of structure.

Amidst what would seem a generally inhospitable area due to the lack of food and water sources, several artifacts have been located at the site from distant locations, implying that Wupatki was involved in trade. Items from as far as the Pacific and the Gulf Coast have been located at the site, such as many different varieties of pottery.

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Posted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 11:55 pm
by nrobertb
Here's an unusual blade from Edmond Knife House. I wonder how practical it would be to use.

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Posted: Thu Jun 14, 2018 9:11 am
by nrobertb
Shiprock Trading Post is a center for the Yei rug (pronounced "yay"), which depicts religious figures but has no religious significance. Designs usually iclude cornstalks and arrows.

Another type is the Yeibechai which depicts dancers, usually in profile, dressed as the Yei.

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Posted: Thu Jun 14, 2018 6:47 pm
by nrobertb
An antler handled knife by DKC.

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Posted: Thu Jun 14, 2018 11:47 pm
by nrobertb
The storm pattern rug is associated with the western half of the Navajo reservation. Elements include the four winds, lightning and rain falling from clouds.

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Posted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 9:57 am
by nrobertb
Walnut Canyon National Monument is located about 10 mi. southeast of Flagstaff, Arizona, near Interstate 40. The canyon rim elevation is 6,690 ft. A 0.9 mi loop trail descends 185 ft into the canyon passing 25 cliff dwelling rooms constructed by the Sinagua, a pre-Columbian cultural group that lived in Walnut Canyon from about 1100 to 1250 CE.

Sinagua is Spanish for "without water", an acknowledgement that the Sinagua people were able to live in such a dry region. The Sinagua became experts at conserving water and dealing with droughts. They were active traders for goods that stretched to the Gulf of Mexico and as far as Central America. They left mysteriously around 1250 CE. perhaps because of fear of neighboring tribes or droughts, leaving over 80 cliff dwellings behind.

The Sinagua built their homes under limestone ledges, deep within the canyon, some time between 1125 and 1250 CE - taking advantage of the natural recesses in the limestone cliff walls which were eroded over millions of years by flowing water. Because of the area's dry climate, the water present in the canyon was essential for its inhabitants over 700 years ago as it is for animal and plant life today. The plant life is very diverse in Walnut Canyon, with more than 387 different plant species, including high concentrations of important plant species that probably contributed to the decision to settle in the area.