Well, the board is either fixed, or it's going to run terribly. Cross your fingers and hope for the best. I'm at my technical limit right now.

Spurs and the Great West

Message
Author
User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 652
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#421 Post by nrobertb » Thu Jun 07, 2018 10:19 pm

Indians sometimes pawn their jewelry. If they don't reclaim it by a deadline, the pawnbroker sells it to a trader. I've had this pawn piece belt buckle since the 1970's. It is an example of a "sand cast" piece of silver. A block of sandstone is carved out and molten silver poured in. Then the flaws are filed off.
Attachments
DSC00302.JPG

LCPfraTN
Junior Member
Junior Member
Posts: 49
Joined: Sun Jun 04, 2017 10:29 pm
Age: 57
Location: Eads, Tennessee
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#422 Post by LCPfraTN » Thu Jun 07, 2018 10:25 pm

You’ve been showcasing some really beautiful stuff and the background stories are very interesting and educational.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

ffuries
Member
Member
Posts: 382
Joined: Fri Jun 02, 2017 8:51 pm
Age: 50
Location: Panama City, Florida
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#423 Post by ffuries » Thu Jun 07, 2018 10:40 pm

Yes the background information is very educational. First place I hit in the morning and last place I hit in the evening. Thing is with this post is that I usually google some of the topics to learn more. OMG I'm back in school and didn't catch on for how long.........LOL. Keep posting away I've enjoyed it very much.

Did you ever think this post would get this long when you first started it?
Mike
TSgt, USAF Retired
Jan 86 - Sept 08
Aircrew Life Support
"Your Life Is Our Business"
(122X0, 1T1X1, 1P0X1)
NRA Life Member

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 652
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#424 Post by nrobertb » Fri Jun 08, 2018 10:07 am

No, I had no idea what a few spur photos would lead to.

Here is a case full of Indian jewelry. There's a lot of money represented there.
Attachments
jewelry.jpeg

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 652
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#425 Post by nrobertb » Fri Jun 08, 2018 2:33 pm

These Navajo women are wearing the traditional dress and never go anywhere without their jewelry. When I attended my son's graduation from Navy basic training in Chicago, there were two women dressed like this to see their sons graduate.
Attachments
nav.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 652
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#426 Post by nrobertb » Fri Jun 08, 2018 10:13 pm

Royston turquoise is known for bold color variations, ranging from beautiful soft blue to emerald greens. They can also come with a wide variety of matrix, such as golden brown, black, white, and more.

The Royston Turquoise Mine is located in the Royston mining district near Tonapah, Nevada. The mine is owned and operated by the Otteson family and is still in operation today.
Attachments
royston-turquoise.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 652
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#427 Post by nrobertb » Sat Jun 09, 2018 10:21 am

The National Park Service administers several ancient Indian ruins, but the queen of them all is Mesa Verde near Cortez, Colorado.

Created by President Theodore Roosevelt in 1906, the park occupies 52,485 acres near the Four Corners region of the American Southwest. With more than 4,300 sites, including 600 cliff dwellings, it is the largest archaeological preserve in the U.S. Mesa Verde (Spanish for "green table") is best known for structures such as Cliff Palace, the largest cliff dwelling in North America.

Starting c. 7500 BCE, Mesa Verde was seasonally inhabited by a group of nomadic Paleo-Indians known as the Foothills Mountain Complex. The variety of projectile points found in the region indicates they were influenced by surrounding areas, including the Great Basin, the San Juan Basin, and the Rio Grande Valley. Later, Archaic people established semi-permanent rockshelters in and around the mesa. By 1000 BCE, the Basketmaker culture emerged from the local Archaic population, and by 750 CE the Ancestral Puebloans had developed from the Basketmaker culture.

The Mesa Verdeans survived using a combination of hunting, gathering, and subsistence farming of crops such as corn, beans, and squash. They built the mesa's first pueblos sometime after 650, and by the end of the 12th century, they began to construct the massive cliff dwellings for which the park is best known. By 1285, following a period of social and environmental instability driven by a series of severe and prolonged droughts, they abandoned the area and moved south to locations in Arizona and New Mexico, including Rio Chama, Pajarito Plateau, and Santa Fe.

The photos are of Cliff Palace and a tour to Balcony House.
Attachments
meve2.jpg
meve.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 652
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#428 Post by nrobertb » Sat Jun 09, 2018 3:22 pm

Sleeping Beauty turquoise comes in a pure sky blue or robin’s egg blue color and is relatively stable and suitable for jewelry making.

The Sleeping Beauty Turquoise Mine, located in Globe, Arizona, is one of the most famous and produces some of the most desirable turquoise in the world due to the purity of its color. The mine closed for a second time (first time in the early 1960's) in August 2012, which has caused the price to skyrocket.
Attachments
sleeping.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 652
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#429 Post by nrobertb » Sat Jun 09, 2018 10:17 pm

When I lived in the southwest, I developed an appreciation for Indians arts and crafts, especially as represented in Navajo rugs. The Navajo Reservation is huge, extending into three states. Over time different styles of rugs have been developed in different areas, so I'll highlight a few. The photo shows a Navajo weaver with her family in 1873.
Attachments
1873-Navajofamily.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 652
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#430 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jun 10, 2018 12:29 am

Two Grey Hills style is characterized by mainly dark tones: black, brown, grey, but also white.
Attachments
greyh.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 652
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#431 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jun 10, 2018 11:29 am

Navajo rugs are all wool, sometimes in its natural color, or dyed with native plant materials, sometimes even with modern aniline dyes. They are characterized by 3 or 4 strings knotted together at the corners of the rugs.

There are cheap copies being imported from Mexico but they are made on a different kind of loom and have a row of strings all along two ends of the piece.

Rug styles grew up around various trading posts and were influenced by the traders.
Attachments
Navajo-Rugs-Reservation-Map.jpg
Navajo-Rugs-Reservation-Map.jpg (59.73 KiB) Viewed 449 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 652
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#432 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jun 10, 2018 3:19 pm

The Ganado rug is perhaps the best known Navajo style. The central motif is usually a bold diamond or cross, sometimes outlined in another color. Smaller forms fill the remaining space. Bright reds are the dominant color.
Attachments
ganado2.jpg
ganado2.jpg (13.63 KiB) Viewed 444 times
ganado.jpeg
ganado.jpeg (16.28 KiB) Viewed 444 times

ffuries
Member
Member
Posts: 382
Joined: Fri Jun 02, 2017 8:51 pm
Age: 50
Location: Panama City, Florida
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#433 Post by ffuries » Sun Jun 10, 2018 4:10 pm

Some beautiful blankets. My parents had one don't know what ever happened to it. I really do need to get a new one.

I like the Ganado style examples you show.
Mike
TSgt, USAF Retired
Jan 86 - Sept 08
Aircrew Life Support
"Your Life Is Our Business"
(122X0, 1T1X1, 1P0X1)
NRA Life Member

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 652
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#434 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jun 10, 2018 4:40 pm

Navajo rugs aren't cheap, which is only fair considering the thousands of hours that go into one. Size is a major factor, as is the number of threads per inch.
There are some miniature wall hangings that are so tightly woven you can't believe they were done by hand, and they bring really big bucks from collectors.

Back in 1970 I purchased a 4'x6' rug for $300. In today's money that would be close to $2,000.

When buying. look for tightness of weave and mistakes in the pattern. There are beginning weavers and experienced weavers. There is an urban legend that a weaver purposely incorporates a flaw for some spiritual reason. Nope, she just goofed.

Now here is the Crystal rug, It is borderless, and composed of all vegetal died, earth-toned hues of brown, gold and orange, with subtle touches of green, grey and maroon. The basic pattern is stripes and bands.
Attachments
crystal4.jpeg
crystal4.jpeg (30.42 KiB) Viewed 436 times
crystal3.jpeg
crystal3.jpeg (35.63 KiB) Viewed 436 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 652
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#435 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jun 10, 2018 7:23 pm

This is way off track, but it just popped into my head. In just about every western, no matter which tribe the Indians are supposed to be from, they are probably speaking Navajo. A good example is the recent film "A Million Ways To Die in the West".

They don't always follow the script because no one else knows the difference. A classic example of this was one of John Wayne's films. They love to show it in Navajo country and the audience laughs uproariously as the Indian actors make rude remarks about the white actors.

One exception was "Dances With Wolves". where they actually were speaking Sioux. However, the Sioux have separate languages for men and women. The men's language was considered so hard to learn that the dialogue coach had everyone use the women 's language.

And now, back to rugs. The Teec Nos Pos has been described as the "least Navajo". It has a Persian flair,, probably due to the influence of an early trader. It has intricate designs with flamboyant colors and a broad border with interlocking figures. The main pattern consists of zigzags, diamonds and boxes.
Attachments
teec2.jpeg
teec2.jpeg (19.03 KiB) Viewed 432 times
teec.jpeg
teec.jpeg (17.65 KiB) Viewed 432 times

Post Reply

Return to “General Off Topic”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest