Spurs and the Great West

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1722
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

Range Riders Museum, Miles City. Montana.A large Museum just jam-packed with exhibits ranging from the age of the dinosaurs to the 21st century! Exhibits include: many from the Native Americans of the area; from the pioneers of the range country of the Great Plains; from soldiers, including General Custer (for whom the county is named) as well as from General Miles (for whom the town is named).
Attachments
Range-Riders3.jpg
Range-Riders3.jpg (149.31 KiB) Viewed 1015 times
Range Riders Museum.jpg
Range Riders Museum.jpg (90.29 KiB) Viewed 1015 times
Range Riders 2.jpg
Range Riders 2.jpg (116.77 KiB) Viewed 1015 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1722
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

The Bain Wagon Company was one of the most recognized and respected wagon makers in the United States. It began in the late 1830s as Mitchell & Quarles. Edward Bain and George Yule worked for the company. In 1852, Bain took over the Kenosha, WI factory and established the Bain Wagon Company, and promoted Yule to superintendent.

George Yule, had worked his way up from wagon maker in 1842 to president and owner of the Bain Wagon Company in 1911. Yule had emigrated from Aberdeenshire, Scotland to Somers, Wisconsin with his father and siblings in 1840. A number of family members settled in Millburn, Lake County, Illinois, including George's brother James Yule.
Attachments
Bain Wagon Co advertisement_1916.jpg
Bain Wagon Co advertisement_1916.jpg (97.06 KiB) Viewed 997 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1722
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

Great western character actors: Forever and fondly remembered as Don Adams' foil on the popular Mel Brooks/Buck Henry spy series Get Smart (1965), character actor Ed Platt (also billed as Edward C. Platt) had been around for two decades prior to copping that rare comedy role. Born in Staten Island, New York, he inherited an appreciation of music on his mother's side.

WWII interrupted his early career. Ed served as a radio operator with the army and would find himself on radio again in the post-war years where his deep, resonant voice proved ideal. A number of musical comedy roles also came his way again. In 1947, he made it to Broadway with the musical "Allegro." Star José Ferrer took an interest in Ed while they both were appearing in "The Shrike" on Broadway in 1952. Around 1953, Edward moved to Texas to be near his brother and began anchoring the local news and kiddie birthday party show called "Uncle Eddie's Kiddie Party." Ferrer remembered Platt and invited him to Hollywood where Ferrer was starring in the film version of The Shrike (1955). Ed recreated his stage role. He also earned fine notices as James Dean's understanding juvenile officer in the classic film Rebel Without a Cause (1955). This led to a plethora of film and TV support offers where the balding actor made fine use of his dark, rich voice, stern intensity and pragmatic air, portraying a slew of professional and shady types in crime yarns, soap dramas and war pictures -- everything from principals and prosecutors to mobsters and murderers.

Edward Platt will forever be known as the Chief, aka Harold Clark, aka Thaddeus, on "Get Smart." According to the show's co-creator, Leonard Stern, he remembered Platt as the juvenile-truancy officer in "Rebel Without A Cause" and wanted Platt specifically for the role of Chief. When Platt, a professionally-trained baritone, came, in he broke into song, setting a scene sufficiently silly that Stern immediately knew that Platt could carry off comedy.
Attachments
Edwardplatt.jpg
Edwardplatt.jpg (14.6 KiB) Viewed 973 times
edward_platt2.jpg
edward_platt2.jpg (21.98 KiB) Viewed 973 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1722
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

Forgotten western movies: Under A Texas Moon (1930)
Frank Fay, as a Mexican named Don Carlos, rides into a small Texas border settlement on the Fourth of July in the early 1880s. He is accompanied by his two inseparable companions, played by Georgie Stone and George Cooper. The day is being celebrated in the style of a Spanish fiesta. Fay challenges a rough Texan, played by Noah Beery, to a duel, only to find himself invited to undertake the dangerous task of capturing a cattle rustler who has been stealing cattle from the Lazy Y Ranch. He accepts the task on the promise of receiving $7000 in gold if he can return both the thief and the stolen cattle within 10 days.

During the next nine days, Fay spends his time making love to every pretty girl he meets, serenading many of them by singing the theme song to the film while playing his guitar, while his two companions join in the harmonizing. He lies to them all, telling each girl exactly what she wishes to hear. Throughout all this time, he does nothing towards earning his reward. On the 10th day, he captures the cattle rustler and turns up the cattle to everyone's surprise by using a simple method of which no one had thought. He rides back to Mexico with his latest conquest in his arms.

Frank Fay as Don Carlos
Raquel Torres as Raquella
Myrna Loy as Lolita Romero
Armida as Dolores
Noah Beery as Jed Parker
Georgie Stone as Pedro
George Cooper as Philipe
Charles Sellon as José Romero
Jack Curtis as Buck Johnson
Sam Appel as Pancho Gonzalez
Tully Marshall as Gus Aldrich
Mona Maris as Lolita Roberto
Attachments
Raquel_Torres_-_Under_A_Texas_Moon.jpg
Raquel_Torres_-_Under_A_Texas_Moon.jpg (89.12 KiB) Viewed 946 times
Under_A_Texas_Moon_1930_Poster.jpg
Under_A_Texas_Moon_1930_Poster.jpg (29.01 KiB) Viewed 946 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1722
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

The basis of the future Mitchell-Lewis Motor Company began with Henry Mitchell’s original learned trade: wheel-making. He was the first man in Chicago to build wagons for consumers. He brought his trade to Southport (now Kenosha, Wisconsin and then Racine, building the foundation for the wagon company to prosper and eventually evolve into an automobile manufacturing titan.

The year 1834 saw the launch of Henry Mitchell’s first wagon venture in Chicago. As the city had only been established a short while before his arrival, it was easy for him to be the only wagon builder, but to be the first person to build a complete wagon is another distinction entirely. By 1837, Mitchell and his family had moved to Southport, Wisconsin, where a chance meeting with Joseph Quarles would lead to a prosperous business partnership. The two men formed the firm Mitchell & Quarles, and opened up the first Mitchell Wagon Works. Over 15 years later, Mitchell and Quarles went their separate ways, with Mitchell relocating once again, this time to Racine, Wisconsin, after selling the Southport plant to Edward Bain. His new company in Racine would be named The Mitchell Wagon Company and its success made the Mitchell name recognizable not only across the United States, but all over the world.

The wagons that were made at The Mitchell Wagon Company were made out of local Wisconsin hardwoods. However, eventually Mitchell decided that he wanted a higher quality for the hubs, spokes, and axles. This was to ensure that the highest quality of wagon was being built for his customers. The company began shipping in oak and hickory timber from the Ozarks in Arkansas and Missouri. The oak and hickory timber proved to be more resilient against wear and tear, allowing Mitchell to sell the wagons with a 12-month warranty! Because of this, The Mitchell Wagon Company was met with a huge demand for the highest quality wagons from travelers migrating out to the west, many of them soldiers who had fought in the Civil War and were looking for a new beginning in a new land. Mitchell’s factory constructed the finest product, even after a fire burned the factory down in 1880. By 1890, the factory and its employees were churning out 100 wagons a day, all the way until the turn of the century, even shipping internationally to South Africa, Australia, New Zealand, Argentina, Mexico and Canada!

There were three main categories of wagons that were built by The Mitchell Wagon Company: farm wagons, rural wagons, and urban wagons. Within these categories, Mitchell differentiated the wagons by their intended geographic destination and also their intended function.

There was great diversity among the Farm Wagons produced because of the various terrains and climates where the wagons would be utilized. A few examples of farm wagon styles were the “California Stake Style,” the “Oregon Style,” and the “Utah Style.” Farm wagons were mainly used for local projects that a family might have maintaining their own farm.

The Rural Wagon styles could be used for more specific occupations. Some styles of the rural wagon include the “Ohio Boot Bed Wagons,” the “Logging Wagons,” the “Coal Hauling Wagons,” and the “Georgia Cotton Bale Wagons.” These could also be built to the specifications of their intended terrain.

The Urban Wagons would have been used when Henry Mitchell first began in Chicago, and probably shipped there later in his career when The Mitchell Wagon Company became even more successful. “Milk Wagons,” “Laundry Wagons,” and “Funeral Wagons” are just some of the Urban Wagon styles, which also included very large wagons for hauling beer or pianos. Some were built so elaborately that they were enclosed with sides, a roof, and even etched glass windows!
Attachments
wagon-catalog-cover-1913.jpg
wagon-catalog-cover-1913.jpg (152.73 KiB) Viewed 927 times
1892 mitchell.jpg
1892 mitchell.jpg (155.88 KiB) Viewed 927 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1722
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

The Blue River is a 50.8-mile-long stream that runs through the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest in Arizona. It arises near Alpine and flows south into the San Francisco River just upstream from Clifton. The Blue River varies in altitude from 6,400 to 4,000 feet.
Attachments
Blue.jpg
Blue.jpg (83.02 KiB) Viewed 907 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1722
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

Here's an interesting hodgepodge: a couple pairs of U.S. Cavalry spurs, a pair that is maybe Mexican, horseshoes, and even a knuckleduster.
Attachments
odd lot.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1722
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

The Siskiyou Mountains are a coastal subrange of the Klamath Mountains, and located in northwestern California and southwestern Oregon in the United States. They extend in an arc for approximately 100 miles from east of Crescent City, California, northeast along the north side of the Klamath River into Josephine and Jackson counties in Oregon. The mountain range forms a barrier between the watersheds of the Klamath River to the south and the Rogue River to the north.

Much of the range is within the Rogue River – Siskiyou and Klamath national forests. The Pacific Crest Trail follows a portion of the ridge of the range. The Klamath-Siskiyou forests are noted for their high biodiversity.

The origin of the word siskiyou is unclear. One version is that it is the Chinook Jargon word for "bob-tailed horse". According to historian Richard Mackie, "siskiyou" was a Cree word for a bob-tailed horse, one of which perished in 1829 during Alexander McLeod's journey over a pass later named for the "siskiyou" (today's Siskiyou Pass). The Cree were in the area as part of McLeod's Hudson's Bay Company expedition, and had been recruited far away in their homeland in eastern Canada. Another version, given in an argument before the State Senate in 1852, is that the French name Six Cailloux, meaning "six-stones", was given to a ford on the Umpqua River by Michel Laframboise and a party of Hudson's Bay Company trappers in 1832, because six large stones or rocks lay in the river where they crossed. According to some, the Six Cailloux name was appropriated to this region by Stephen Meek, another Hudson's Bay Company trapper who was known for his "discovery" of Scott Valley, in regard to a crossing on the Klamath River near Hornbrook. Still others attribute the name to a local tribe of Native Americans.

Natives speaking the Athapaskan Language lived along the Rogue River prior to 1850. These settlements were primarily winter residences, and the people likely spent much of the summer in the mountains.

Most early exploration of the area came from the coast, beginning in 1775, when the Spanish lieutenant Bruno de Heceta came to the Northwest. He would be followed in 1791 and 1792 by other explorers like captain George Vancouver, James Baker, and Robert Gray. The early western overland expeditions all avoided the area around the Oregon-California border, so that the first land-based expeditions came when the North West Company came to the area in 1820, followed by the Hudson's Bay Company in 1821.

The Siskiyou Trail stretched from California's Central Valley through the Siskiyous to Oregon's Willamette Valley. Originally based on existing Native American foot trails winding their way through river valleys, the Siskiyou Trail provided the shortest practical travel path between early settlements in California and Oregon in the 1820s.
Attachments
Bear_Mountain_below_Devils_Punchbowl_in_Siskiyou_Wilderness.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1722
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

This is an antique Navajo rug, dating from around 1890.
Attachments
rug.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1722
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

Here are a couple more pairs of spurs by the inimitable Oscar Crockett.
Attachments
Crock24.jpg
Crock24.jpg (31.34 KiB) Viewed 815 times
Crock23.jpg
Crock23.jpg (31.69 KiB) Viewed 815 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1722
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

Western Barrel Racing Saddles
Western barrel racing saddles come in a variety of styles, and are designed to keep the rider in place at top speed. A barrel racing saddle is made with a deep pocket, high cantle and with a light weight seat. Western saddles for barrel racing come in round skirt or square skirt, ostrich or gator print, or with silver bling.

Reinsman, Dakota, and Royal King are some of the top brands.
Attachments
barrel3.jpg
barrel3.jpg (32.07 KiB) Viewed 781 times
barrel2.jpg
barrel.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1722
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

The American Quarter Horse is best known today as a show horse, race horse, reining and cutting horse, rodeo competitor, ranch horse, and all-around family horse. Quarter Horses are commonly used in rodeo events such as barrel racing, calf roping and team roping; and gymkhana or O-Mok-See. Other stock horse events such as cutting and reining are open to all breeds but are dominated by American Quarter Horse.

The breed is not only well-suited for western riding and cattle work. Many race tracks offer Quarter Horses a wide assortment of pari-mutuel horse racing with earnings in the millions. Quarter Horses have also been trained to compete in dressage and show jumping. They are also used for recreational trail riding and in mounted police units.

The American Quarter Horse has also been exported worldwide. European nations such as Germany and Italy have imported large numbers of Quarter Horses. Next to the American Quarter Horse Association (which also encompasses Quarter Horses from Canada), the second largest registry of Quarter Horses is in Brazil, followed by Australia. In the UK the breed is also becoming very popular, especially with the two Western riding Associations, the Western Horse Association and The Western Equestrian Society.] With the internationalization of the discipline of reining and its acceptance as one of the official seven events of the World Equestrian Games, there is a growing international interest in Quarter Horses. The American Quarter Horse is the most popular breed in the United States today, and the American Quarter Horse Association is the largest breed registry in the world, with nearly 3 million American Quarter Horses registered worldwide in 2014.

The Quarter Horse has a small, short, refined head with a straight profile, and a strong, well-muscled body, featuring a broad chest and powerful, rounded hindquarters. They usually stand between 14 and 16 hands (56 and 64 inches) high, although some Halter-type and English hunter-type horses may grow as tall as 17 hands (68 inches).

There are two main body types: the stock type and the hunter or racing type. The stock horse type is shorter, more compact, stocky and well-muscled, yet agile. The racing and hunter type Quarter Horses are somewhat taller and smoother muscled than the stock type, more closely resembling the Thoroughbred.

Quarter Horses come in nearly all colors. The most common color is sorrel, a brownish red, part of the color group called chestnut by most other breed registries. Other recognized colors include bay, black, brown, buckskin, palomino, gray, dun, red dun, grullo (also occasionally referred to as blue dun), red roan, blue roan, bay roan, perlino, cremello, and white.] In the past, spotted color patterns were excluded, but now with the advent of DNA testing to verify parentage, the registry accepts all colors as long as both parents are registered.
Attachments
Auarter2.jpg
Quarter.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1722
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

Forgotten western movies: The Covered Wagon
The Covered Wagon is a 1923 American silent Western film released by Paramount Pictures. The film was directed by James Cruze based on a novel by Emerson Hough about a group of pioneers traveling through the old West from Kansas to Oregon. J. Warren Kerrigan starred as Will Banion and Lois Wilson as Molly Wingate. On their quest they experience desert heat, mountain snow, hunger, and Indian attack.

The Covered Wagon is one of many films from 1923 that entered the public domain in the United States on January 1, 2019.

The film required a large cast and film crew and many extras, and was filmed in various locations, including Palm Springs, California and several places in Nevada and Utah. The dramatic buffalo hunt and buffalo stampede scenes were filmed on Antelope Island, Great Salt Lake, Utah. During filming for the movie, seven bison from the Antelope Island Bison Herd were shot and killed.

The covered wagons gathered by Paramount from all over the Southwest were not replicas, but the real wagons that had brought the pioneers west. They were cherished heirlooms of the families who owned them. The producers offered the owners $2 a day and feed for their stock if they would bring the wagons for the movie.

J. Warren Kerrigan as Will Banion (hero)
Lois Wilson as Molly Wingate (heroine)
Alan Hale as Sam Woodhull (villain)
Ernest Torrence as William Jackson
Tully Marshall as Jim Bridger
Ethel Wales as Mrs. Wingate
Charles Ogle as Jesse Wingate
Guy Oliver as Kit Carson
Johnny Fox as Jed Wingate
James Cruze as Indian (scenes deleted)
Frank Albertson as Minor Role (uncredited)
John Bose as Pioneer (uncredited)
Barbara Brower as Pioneer Child (uncredited)
Chief Thunderbird as Indian (uncredited)
Constance Wilson as Minor Role (uncredited)
Attachments
The_Covered_Wagon_poster.jpg
The_Covered_Wagon_poster.jpg (28.33 KiB) Viewed 708 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1722
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

The White River is a Missouri River tributary that flows 580 miles through the U.S. states of Nebraska and South Dakota. The name stems from the water's white-gray color, a function of eroded sand, clay, and volcanic ash carried by the river from its source near the Badlands. Draining a basin of about 10,200 square miles, about 8,500 square miles of which is in South Dakota, the stream flows through a region of sparsely populated hills, plateaus, and badlands.

The White River rises in northwestern Nebraska, in the Pine Ridge escarpment north of Harrison, at an elevation of 4,861 feet above sea level. It flows southeast then northeast past Fort Robinson and north of Crawford. It crosses into southwestern South Dakota and flows north across the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, then northeast, receiving Wounded Knee Creek and flowing between units of Badlands National Park. It flows east-northeast and southeast at the northern edge of the reservation, forming the northern boundary of the reservation and the southern boundary of Buffalo Gap National Grassland. It receives the Little White River about 15 miles south of Murdo, and flows east to join the Missouri in Lake Francis Case about 15 mil southwest of Chamberlain.

The river sometimes has no surface flow due to the dry climate surrounding its badlands and prairie basin, though thunderstorms can cause brief intense flow. The river near Chamberlain flows year-round.
Attachments
White_River_Indiana.jpg
White_River_Indiana.jpg (15.65 KiB) Viewed 681 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1722
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

Here's a pair of gold and silver spurs from Uruguay. Very ornate.
Attachments
Uruguayan.jpg

Post Reply

Return to “General Off Topic”