Spurs and the Great West

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nrobertb
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Wheeler Peak is the highest natural point in the U.S. state of New Mexico. It is located northeast of Taos and south of Red River in the northern part of the state, and just 2 miles southeast of the ski slopes of Taos Ski Valley. It lies in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, the southernmost subrange of the Rocky Mountains. The peak's elevation is 13,167 feet.

Formerly named Taos Peak, after the nearby town of Taos, New Mexico, it was renamed Wheeler Peak in 1950. A plaque at the summit states that the mountain was named in honor of Major George Montague Wheeler (1842–1905) who for ten years led a party of surveyors and naturalists collecting geologic, biologic, planimetric and topographic data in New Mexico and six other southwestern states.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Great western character actors: Gloria Talbott was born in the Los Angeles suburb of Glendale, a city co-founded by her grandfather. Growing up in the shadows of the Hollywood studios, her interests inevitably turned to acting, with the result that she participated in school plays and landed small parts in films such as "Maytime" (1937), "Sweet and Lowdown" (1943) and "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn" (1945). After leaving school, she started her own dramatic group and played "arena"-style shows at various clubs. After a three-year hiatus, Talbott resumed her career, working extensively in both TV and films. Her sister is actress Lori Talbott.

Interviewed in Tom Weaver's book "Interviews with B Science Fiction and Horror Movie Makers" (McFarland & Co., 1988).
She loved her role in Daughter of Dr. Jekyll (1957), but John Agar hated his.
She was an accomplished equestrian. In her many appearances in western films and TV shows, she would frequently leap up and plant her foot into the stirrup, a move that took considerable skill and practice. She rode effortlessly with a confidence that was easily discernible, often at very high speeds.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Forgotten western movies:
Oklahoma Frontier is a 1939 American Western film written and directed by Ford Beebe. The film stars Johnny Mack Brown, Bob Baker, Fuzzy Knight, Anne Gwynne, James Blaine and Bob Kortman. The film was released on October 10, 1939, by Universal Pictures.

It's the opening of the Cherokee strip and the Rankins are after a particular section. Frazier is also after the same section and has hired outlaws to make sure he gets it.

Johnny Mack Brown as Jeff McLeod
Bob Baker as Tom Rankin
Fuzzy Knight as Windy Day
Anne Gwynne as Janet Rankin
James Blaine as George Frazier
Bob Kortman as J. W. Saunders
Charles King as Soapy
Harry Tenbrook as Grimes
Lane Chandler as Sergeant
Horace Murphy as Mushy
Lloyd Ingraham as Judge
Joe De La Cruz as Cheyenne
Anthony Warde as Wayne
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Two pairs of Mexican spurs.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Bill Miner was born Ezra Allen Miner in Vevay Township, near Onondaga, Ingham County, Michigan on December 27, 1846. He was arrested for the first time in 1866 in San Joaquin County, California and served time there. He was shortly released but served more time at Placer County, California and later at Calaveras County, California. He was discharged in 1880. He then formed a partnership with Bill Leroy (as W. A. Morgan) to rob a stagecoach. Leroy was caught and lynched, but Miner escaped. He was later caught for another robbery in Tuolumne County, California and was released from San Quentin in 1901.

After his third prison term, Miner moved to the province of British Columbia in Canada, where he adopted the pseudonym George Edwards and is believed to have staged British Columbia's first-ever train robbery on September 10, at Silverdale about 35 km east of Vancouver, just west of Mission City. It is often claimed that Miner was the robber, but neither he nor his accomplices were ever tied conclusively to the Silverdale heist. It is also widely reported that Silverdale's train robbery was the first in Canada, but Peter Grauer's definitive study ("Interred With Their Bones", 2005) cites a train robbery in Port Credit, Ontario 30 years prior as the first.

Miner was eventually caught after a botched payroll train robbery near Kamloops at Monte Creek. Choosing the wrong car, they managed only to rob $15 plus a bottle of kidney pills that Miner picked up off of a shelf. Miner and his two accomplices, Tom "Shorty" Dunn and Louis Colquhoun, were located near Douglas Lake, British Columbia after an extensive manhunt. A posse surrounded them while they were lunching in the woods. Miner presented himself as George Edwards and claimed that he and his cohorts were prospectors. The officer in charge of the posse suspected he had encountered the nefarious train-robbing gang and challenged the claim, putting them under arrest.

Dunn attempted to fire at the police and was shot in the leg. He gave up quickly after being wounded. Colquhoun was disarmed by an officer standing nearby and Miner never drew his weapon. Miner's arrest and subsequent trial in Kamloops caused a media spectacle. Apparently the most damning evidence against him was the bottle of kidney pills that Miner had picked up during the robbery. Upon his conviction, he, Dunn and Colquhoun were transported by train to the provincial penitentiary in New Westminster. By that time, Miner's celebrity status had risen to the point that the tracks were reputedly lined with throngs of supporters, many of whom expressed satisfaction with the fact that someone had taken the very unpopular CPR to task.

While serving time in the B.C. Penitentiary, Miner escaped in 1907 and was never recaptured in Canada. He moved back to the United States, becoming once again involved in robberies in the South at Gainesville in 1909. There, he served more prison time, and escaped twice.

He died in the prison farm at Milledgeville, Georgia, of gastritis, contracted from drinking brackish water during his previous escape attempt.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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The Marais des Cygnes River is a principal tributary of the Osage River, about 217 miles in eastern Kansas and western Missouri in the United States. Via the Osage and Missouri rivers, it is part of the watershed of the Mississippi River.

The name Marais des Cygnes means "Marsh of the Swans" in French (presumably in reference to the trumpeter swan which was historically common in the Midwest).

The river is notorious for flash flooding. It is referred to in the song "The River" by Chely Wright. La Cygne, Kansas in Linn County and Osawatomie, Kansas in Miami County are gravely affected by its flooding.

The Marais des Cygnes is formed about 1 mile north of Reading, Kansas, a city in northern Lyon County, by the confluence of Elm Creek and One Hundred Forty-Two Mile Creek, and flows generally east-southeastwardly through Osage, Franklin, Miami and Linn counties in Kansas, and Bates County in Missouri, past the Kansas towns of Melvern, Quenemo, Ottawa, Osawatomie and La Cygne and through the Marais des Cygnes National Wildlife Refuge. In Missouri, it joins the Little Osage River at the boundary of Bates and Vernon counties to form the Osage River, 6 miles west of Schell City.

In Osage County, Kansas, a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers dam causes the river to form Melvern Lake, which is the site of Eisenhower State Park.

The Marais des Cygnes River has a history of flooding. One of the first such floods that has been noted is the Great Flood of 1844 known as "Big Water" in Native American legend. Though no measurements were taken, it is estimated to have crested at 40 feet.

The Great Flood of 1951 happened in June and July 1951, killing 28 people and causing over $935 million damage (in 1951 dollars). This flood also affected the Kansas, Neosho, and Verdigris river basins.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Forgotten western movies: PANHANDLE
John Sands, a former Texas marshal turns to ranching, and later to a gunfighter when he sets out to prove that casino/saloon owner, Matt Garson, had his brother, a newspaperman, killed.

John Sands Rod Cameron
Jean 'Dusty' Stewart Cathy Downs
Matt Garson Reed Hadley
June O'Carroll Anne Gwynne
Director Lesley Selander
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Here is a nice old half seat saddle with matching saddlebags. The brass tacks are probably a brand but I don't know what that lower design represents, unless maybe a rising or setting sun.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Kings Peak is the highest peak in the state of Utah, with an elevation of 13,534 feet.

It lies just south of the spine of the central Uinta Mountains, in the Ashley National Forest in northeastern Utah, in north-central Duchesne County. It lies within the boundaries of the High Uintas Wilderness. The peak is approximately 79 miles due east of central Salt Lake City, and 45 miles due north of the town of Duchesne.

There are three popular routes to the summit; a scramble up the east slope, a hike up the northern ridge, and a long but relatively easy hike up the southern slope. The peak was named for Clarence King, a surveyor in the area and the first director of the United States Geological Survey. Kings Peak is generally regarded as the hardest state highpoint that can be climbed without specialist rock climbing skills and/or guiding. The easiest route requires a 29 miles round trip hike.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Great western character actors: Willard Lewis Waterman (August 29, 1914, Madison, Wisconsin – February 2, 1995, Burlingame, California) was a character actor in films, TV and on radio, remembered best for replacing Harold Peary as the title character of The Great Gildersleeve at the height of that show's popularity.

Waterman replaced Harold Peary, on "The Great Gildersleeve," radio program after Peary was unable to convince sponsor and show owner Kraft Cheese to allow him an ownership stake in the show. Impressed with better capital-gains deals CBS was willing to offer performers in the high-tax late 1940s, he decided to move from NBC to CBS during the latter's famous talent raids. Kraft, however, refused to move the show to CBS and hired Waterman to replace Peary as the stentorian Throckmorton P. Gildersleeve.

He replaced Peary on The Tom Mix Ralston Straight Shooters. Not only did the two men become longtime friends, but Waterman—who actually looked as though he could have been Peary's sibling, and whose voice was a near-match for Peary's—refused to appropriate the half-leering, half-embarrassed laugh Peary had made a Gildersleeve trademark. He stayed with The Great Gildersleeve from 1950 to 1957 on radio and in a short-lived television series syndicated in 1955.

At the same time he was heard as Gildersleeve, Waterman had a recurring role as Mr. Merriweather in the short-lived but respected radio comedy vehicle for Ronald Colman and his wife Benita Hume, The Halls of Ivy. Waterman's pre-Gildersleeve radio career, in addition to Tom Mix, had included at least one starring vehicle, a short-lived situation comedy, Those Websters, that premiered in 1945.

He had radio roles between the mid 1930s and 1950 on such shows as Chicago Theater of the Air (variety) and Harold Teen (comedy), plus four soap operas: Girl Alone, The Guiding Light, Lonely Women, The Road of Life and Kay Fairchild, Stepmother.

Waterman is remembered for his role as Claude Upson in the 1958 film Auntie Mame. He was also seen in Riding High, Three Coins in the Fountain, and The Apartment.

Waterman's later career included a variety of film and TV supporting roles on such shows as a short-lived television adaptation of The Great Gildersleeve, Vacation Playhouse, Lawman, My Favorite Martian, The Eve Arden Show (four episodes from 1957-1958 as Carl Foster), 77 Sunset Strip, Bonanza, The Dick Van Dyke Show, Guestward Ho!, F Troop, and Dennis the Menace, in which he played the lovable grocer, Mr. Quigley. Between 1957 and 1959, he appeared five times as Mac Maginnis in the ABC sitcom The Real McCoys starring Walter Brennan.

Waterman was all but retired from acting after 1973.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Here is a pair of engraved California style spurs, unfortunately with a bad case of rust.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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The Sawtooth Range is a mountain range of the Rocky Mountains in central Idaho, reaching a maximum elevation of 10,751 feet at the summit of Thompson Peak. It encompass an area of 678 square miles, spanning parts of Custer, Boise, Blaine, and Elmore counties, and is bordered to the east by the Sawtooth Valley. Much of the mountain range is within the Sawtooth Wilderness, part of the Sawtooth National Recreation Area and Sawtooth National Forest.

There are 57 peaks with an elevation over 10,000 feet in the Sawtooth Range, all falling between 10,000 to 10,751 ft. on Thompson Peak, the highest point in the range. Another 77 peaks fall between 9,000 and 10,000 feet.

Climbs range in difficulty between the 9,150-foot Observation Peak, a Class 1 hike, and 8,980-foot King Spire, a rock route rated Class 5.10 on the Yosemite Decimal System.

There have been 202 perennial snow fields mapped in the Sawtooth Range. The Range was last extensively glaciated in the Pleistocene, but glaciers probably existed during the Little Ice Age, which ended around 1850 AD. Evidence of past glaciation given remnants of the glaciers such as glacial lakes, moraines, horns, hanging valleys, cirques, and arêtes.

In 2010, scientists from Idaho State University discovered the Sawtooth Fault near the base of the mountains, running for 40 mi near Stanley and Redfish Lake. The most recent large quakes along it occurred around 4,000 and 7,000 years ago. It is estimated the fault could produce a 7.5 magnitude earthquake, potentially felt as far as Boise.
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The Sawtooth Range is home to hundreds of lakes created by vanished alpine glaciers, with nearly 400 lakes in the Sawtooth Wilderness. Five of the six largest lakes in the range are located outside the wilderness (Redfish, Alturas, Pettit, Yellow Belly, and Stanley lakes), while Sawtooth Lake is within the wilderness.

Most of the east side of the Sawtooth Range is drained by the main stem of the Salmon River and the west side by the South Fork Payette River. Small portions of the northern and southern ends of the range are in the watersheds of the Middle Fork Salmon River and Boise River, respectively.

There are 40 trails totaling nearly 350 miles in the Sawtooth Wilderness that can be used for day hiking, backpacking, and horseback riding and accessed from 23 trailheads. Additional trails traverse the foothills of the mountains outside the designated wilderness. Camping is permitted anywhere in the wilderness. There are several developed campgrounds on the western side of range, outside the Sawtooth Wilderness, including at Redfish, Little Redfish, Alturas, Pettit, and Stanley lakes, as well as at Iron Creek. Restrictions on fires and animals apply in some areas.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Texas Ranger Capt. Junius June Peak holding a Winchester 1873 rifle and wearing his two Colt revolvers on holstered cartridge belts, butts forward in cross draw position.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Guadalupe Peak, also known as Signal Peak, is the highest natural point in Texas, with an elevation of 8,751 feet above sea level. It is located in Guadalupe Mountains National Park, and is part of the Guadalupe Mountains range in southeastern New Mexico and West Texas. The mountain is about 90 miles east of El Paso and about 50 miles southwest of Carlsbad, New Mexico. The peak rises more than 3,000 feet above the arid floor of the Chihuahuan Desert.

The peak can be climbed by a maintained stony trail (4.25 miles each way) with a 3,000 feet elevation gain at any time of the year. The trail is part of the network of hiking trails in the surrounding national park.

A stainless steel pyramid marks the summit. It was erected by American Airlines in 1958 to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Butterfield Overland Mail, a stagecoach route that passed south of the mountain. One side of the pyramid has the American Airlines logo. The second side displays a U.S. Postal Service tribute to the Pony Express Riders of the Butterfield Stage. The third side displays a compass with the logo of the Boy Scouts of America. A summit register contained in a metal ammunition box is located at the base of the pyramid.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Forgotten western movies: Rustler's Roundup
While using the same title as a 1933 Universal film starring Tom Mix, this one combines elements of two Johnny Mack Brown Universal westerns, "Law and Order-1940" and "The Silver Bullet-1942", with the story stress on "Law and Order." The "Vote For Cal Dixon" song is the same as "The Vote For Emily Morgan" song in "The Silver Bullet". while the Cal Dixon name comes from a character in "Law and Order." In this one, Bob Bryan (Kirby Grant) has a marshal's badge pinned to his chest, and with the aid of his pal, Pinkerton J. "Pinky" Pratt (Fuzzy Knight),proceeds to clean up the murder-and-rustling operations in a town ran by a trio of outlaw brothers (Frank Marlo, Edmund Cobb and Ethan Laidlaw), who are basically the same as the Northup brothers from the 1932 "Law and Order" and the Daggett brothers from the 1940 "Law and Order", only they are now known as the Todds.

Kirby Grant ... Bob Ryan
Fuzzy Knight ... Pinkerton J. 'Pinky' Pratt
Jane Adams ... Josephine Fremont
Earle Hodgins ... Sheriff Fin Elder
Charles Miller ... Judge Wayne
Edmund Cobb ... Victor Todd
Ethan Laidlaw ... Louie Todd
Mauritz Hugo ... Jefferson 'Faro' King
Eddy Waller ... Tom Fremont (as Eddy C. Waller)
Frank Merlo ... Jules Todd (as Frank Marlo)
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