Spurs and the Great West

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nrobertb
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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No wonder every implement I see is missing its seat.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Mount Hood is a potentially active stratovolcano in the Cascade Volcanic Arc. It was formed by a subduction zone on the Pacific coast and rests in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. It is located about 50 miles east-southeast of Portland, on the border between Clackamas and Hood River counties. In addition to being Oregon's highest mountain, it is one of the loftiest mountains in the nation based on its prominence, and it offers the only year-round lift-served skiing in North America.

The height assigned to Mount Hood's snow-covered peak is 11,240 feet based on a 1993 scientific expedition. The peak is home to 12 named glaciers and snowfields. It is the highest point in Oregon and the fourth highest in the Cascade Range. Mount Hood is considered the Oregon volcano most likely to erupt, though based on its history, an explosive eruption is unlikely. Still, the odds of an eruption in the next 30 years are estimated at between 3 and 7%, so the U.S. Geological Survey characterizes it as "potentially active", but the mountain is informally considered dormant.
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xring3
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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nrobertb wrote:No wonder every implement I see is missing its seat.
Very nice cast iron! I have 2 cast iron and 3 stamped metal. I’m not really a collector but, I’ll pickup ones if the price is right.



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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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More spurs. The second pair has some interesting etching on the rowels.
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xring3
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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nrobertb wrote:No wonder every implement I see is missing its seat.
My cast iron are a McCormick and a Walter A Wood


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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Mount Whitney is the tallest mountain in the contiguous United States and the Sierra Nevada and the highest point in California, with an elevation of 14,505 feet. It is located in East–Central California, on the boundary between California's Inyo and Tulare counties, 84.6 miles west-northwest of the lowest point in North America at Badwater Basin in Death Valley National Park at 282 ft. below sea level. The west slope of the mountain is in Sequoia National Park and the summit is the southern terminus of the John Muir Trail which runs 211.9 mi. from Happy Isles in Yosemite Valley. The east slope is in the Inyo National Forest in Inyo County.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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William Whitney Brazelton (died August 22, 1878) was an outlaw and stage robber of the Wild West.
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After his death, an 1878 account claimed that Brazelton had come from San Francisco, California; had been orphaned and lived in an old boiler; had killed a man at the age of 15, and then killed a seven-man posse near Silver City, New Mexico. In 1902 John Clum repeated these claims of Brazelton's early life; however Clum did not furnish any references for his claims. Historian Erik J. Wright has published widely on the life and crimes of William Brazelton, yet has concluded that his life remains shrouded in mystery. Wright's last study on the outlaw pinpointed the site of his death at the southeast corner of what is now Mission and Ajo in Tucson, Arizona.

About 1876 Brazelton came to the courthouse in Prescott, Arizona and claimed that in a show he would eat a wagon wheel. After collecting money he left by explaining he would rustle up the rest of the troupe; of course he never returned.

In 1877 Brazelton resided in Tucson, Arizona where he hauled products such as hay and grains.

Brazelton's mode of robbery was to wear a mask over his face and carry a pistol and rifle in one hand while ordering the driver and passengers to hand over any valuables.
He is alleged to have committed nine stage robberies in Arizona and New Mexico: three near Silver City (including Cook's Canyon) New Mexico; two in northern Arizona and four near Tucson.

April 28, 1877 the stage going North between Socoro and Las Lunas on the Rio Grande was robbed of three bars and a one box silver.
September 27, 1877 the California and Arizona Stage 12 miles north of Wickenburg, Arizona was held up; among the passengers were Alexandra, Arizona founder and mine owner Ed. G. Peck. The Express box was opened up and the mail bags were ripped. $1,900 in cold coins and gold dust was taken; although the initial report claimed that two robbers were involved, Brazelton is named as the sole stage robber.
May 28, 1878 the stage from Silver City, New Mexico at Cook's Canyon was held up. Taken was valuable registered mail; $26.00 to $27.00 and an old silver watch from Willard and $13.00 taken from the driver and other passengers.
July 31, 1878 the stage robbed at Point Mountain 18 miles from Tucson, Arizona. Among the passengers was newspaper editor John Clum. The express box (empty) and two mail bags (containing nothing of value) were thrown down. $37.00 was robbed from the passengers. Among items taken was a registered package containing a pair of earrings.
August 15, 1878 the stage robbed at Point Mountain 18 miles from Tucson, Arizona. The express box and the mail bags were thrown down. $234.00 was robbed from the passengers.
End of Career
A horse used by Brazelton in his last robbery was traced to the possession of David Nemitz; Nemitz was arrested and agreed to help bring in Brazelton in return for protection from Brazelton; Pima County Sheriff Charles A. Shibell led a five-man posse that killed Brazelton two miles south of Tucson, Arizona on August 22, 1878. Brazelton had two cartridges belts; two pistols; a Spencer rifle, his mask, earrings from the Point Mountain Robbery and a gold watch and chain.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Ketchum, Idaho: Welcome to Wagon Days - a magical Labor Day weekend of connection and celebration. A connection to our history and heritage and the days before motorized travel. A celebration of the lives and livelihoods of people before us that inspired our town on a path to where we are today.

Come to Main Street and see the largest non-motorized parade in the Pacific Northwest. Wheels, wagons and western cowboys combine with marching bands and Basque dancers to make this a lively, colorful event. As the parade ends, we roll from the past into the present with live music at the Street Party on Town Square.

Throughout the weekend there will be many activities for you to enjoy – pancake breakfast, a bareback riding demonstration, an arts and crafts festival and an antique fair. Listen to cowboy poets and meandering musicians wandering our streets or shop at our boutiques and art galleries. With many free children’s activities this is a family-friendly occasion.

More than just a fun weekend, this event fosters a sense of place, connects us to the past and hopefully inspires, educates and provide perspectives for the future.

The photos are of the 20 mule team that pulls the six old silver ore wagons.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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John King Fisher (October 1853 – March 11, 1884) was a gunslinger from the U.S. state of Texas during the heyday of the American Old West.

Fisher was born during October 1853 in Collin County, north of Dallas, Texas, to Jobe Fisher and the former Lucinda Warren.

Jobe Fisher was a cattleman who owned and operated two freight wagons. After the death of his stepmother Minerva, the Fishers moved to Goliad, west of Victoria, Texas, where they were joined by his paternal grandmother, who helped her son raise his children. King Fisher was restless, handsome, popular with the girls, and prone to running with a tough crowd. His father sent him to live with his brother James circa 1869. Some two years later, Fisher was arrested for horse theft and sentenced to two years in prison. However, because of his youth, he was released after only a short time that same year.

After his release from prison, Fisher began working as a cowboy, breaking horses. Because of the incessant raids, lootings, and rapes of Texas ranch and farm families by bandits, he soon found himself taking part in posse activities. As a result of his successes in this arena, he fancied himself as a gunman. Fisher began to dress rather flamboyantly and carried ivory handled pistols. He became quite proficient with a gun and began running with a band of outlaws which carried out frequent raids into Mexico.

However, after only a short time, a dispute arose over how the spoils of their loot would be divided. One of the men drew his pistol, and Fisher immediately pulled his guns and managed to kill three of the bandits in the ensuing shootout. He then took over as leader of the gang, and over the course of the next several months killed seven more Mexican bandits. In 1872, he bought a ranch on the Rio Grande near Eagle Pass, in Maverick County on the Mexican border. He used this ranch as his gang's base of operations and even was so brazen as to place a sign that read "This is King Fisher's road. Take the other one."

During this time, King Fisher rarely committed acts of violence or theft against other Texas settlers, instead opting to raid and rustle cattle across the Mexican border. This was a time of massive raids, pillaging, looting, raping, and murder by United States and Mexican bandits. In response to feelings of alleged lack of reprisal or defense by authorities, the Texans formed more groups of bandits. This activity only fueled disputes and ill will from the Mexican side and generated substantial problems for Texas Ranger battalions, who were trying to quell Mexican bandit raids into Texas. The Texas Rangers, under Leander H. McNelly, opposed the Mexican rebel leader Juan Cortina. The Rangers also raided the Fisher Ranch and arrested Fisher. However, he was released after a "gentleman's agreement"' was reached that his cattle rustling into Mexico would end. Pressure from the Texas Rangers caused Fisher to retire from this trade, and he began legitimate ranching.

By the late 1870s, Fisher had a reputation as being fast with a gun. In 1878, an argument between Fisher and four Mexican vaqueros erupted. Fisher is alleged to have clubbed the nearest one to him with a branding iron, then as a second drew a pistol Fisher drew his own pistol and shot and killed the man. He then spun around and shot the other two, who evidently had not produced weapons and merely sat on the fence during the altercation.

He began a more settled life by working in the cattle business. He served briefly in 1883 as acting sheriff of Uvalde County, Texas. During this service he trailed two stagecoach robbery suspects, the brothers Tom and Jim Hannehan, to their ranch near Leakey in Real County, Texas. The Hannehans resisted, and Fisher shot and killed Tom. Jim then surrendered and was taken into custody along with the stolen loot from the robbery. According to reporter Carey McWilliams, when asked about how many notches he had on his gun (how many people he had killed), he replied, "thirty-seven, not counting Mexicans."

In 1884, while in San Antonio, Texas, on business, Fisher came into contact with his old friend, gunfighter and gambler Ben Thompson. Thompson was unpopular in San Antonio, since he had earlier killed a popular theater owner there named Jack Harris. A feud over that killing had been brewing since between Thompson and friends of Harris. Fisher and Thompson attended a play on March 11 at the Turner Hall Opera House, and later, about 10:30 p.m., they went to the Vaudeville Variety Theater. A local lawman named Jacob Coy sat with them. Thompson wanted to see Joe Foster, a theater owner and friend of Harris's, and one of those fueling the ongoing feud. Thompson had already spoken to Billy Simms, another theater owner, and Foster's new partner.[

Fisher and Thompson were directed upstairs to meet with Foster. Coy and Simms soon joined them in the theater box. Foster refused to speak to Thompson. Fisher allegedly noticed that something was not right. Simms and Coy stepped aside, and as they did Fisher and Thompson leapt to their feet just as a volley of gunfire erupted from another theater box, a hail of bullets hitting both Thompson and Fisher. Thompson fell onto his side, and either Coy or Foster ran up to him and shot him in the head with a pistol. Thompson was unable to return fire and died almost immediately. Fisher was shot thirteen times, and did fire one round in retaliation, possibly wounding Coy, but that is not confirmed. Coy may have been shot by one of the attackers and was left crippled for life.

Foster, in attempting to draw his pistol at the first of the fight, shot himself in the leg, which was later amputated. He died shortly thereafter. The description of the events of that night are contradictory. There was a public outcry for a grand jury indictment of those involved. However, no action was ever taken. The San Antonio police and the prosecutor showed little interest in the case. Fisher was buried on his ranch. His body was later moved to the Pioneer Cemetery in Uvalde, Texas.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Some riders who have trouble with their saddle sliding forward, use a crupper, which is a strap that goes under the horse's tail.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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The Arabia is a side wheeler steamboat that hit a tree snag and sank in the Missouri River near what today is Kansas City, Kansas, on September 5, 1856. It was rediscovered in 1988 by a team of researchers. Today, the artifacts recovered from the site are housed in the Arabia Steamboat Museum.

The Arabia was built in 1853 around the Monongahela River in Brownsville, Pennsylvania. Its paddle wheels were 28 feet across, and its steam boilers consumed approximately thirty cords of wood per day. It averaged five miles an hour going upstream. It traveled the Ohio and Mississippi rivers before it was bought by Captain John Shaw, who operated it on the Missouri River. Its first trip was to carry 109 soldiers from Fort Leavenworth to Fort Pierre, which was located up river in South Dakota. It then traveled up the Yellowstone River, adding 700 miles to the trip. In all, the trip took nearly three months to complete.

In March 1856, the Arabia was sold to Captain William Terrill and William Boyd, and it made fourteen trips up and down the Missouri during their ownership. In March, it collided with an obstacle (either a rock or a sand bar), nearly sinking with a damaged rudder. Repairs were made in nearby Portland. A few weeks later it blew a cylinder head and had to be repaired again.

Also in March 1856, the Arabia was stopped and searched by pro-slavery Border Ruffians near Lexington, Missouri. According to newspaper accounts at the time, a Pennsylvania abolitionist aboard the Arabia dropped a letter, which was discovered and handed over to Captain Shaw. The letter described guns and cannons en route to the slavery-free Kansas Territory from the abolitionist Massachusetts Aid Society. The weapons were discovered in boxes labeled "Carpenters Tools" and confiscated.

On September 5, 1856, the Arabia set out for a routine trip. At Quindaro Bend, near the town of Parkville, Missouri, it hit a submerged sycamore tree snag. The snag ripped open the hull, which rapidly filled with water. The upper decks stayed above water, and the only casualty was a mule that was tied to sawmill equipment and overlooked.

The boat sank so rapidly into the mud that by the next morning, only the smokestacks and pilot house remained visible. Within a few days, these traces were also swept away. Numerous salvage attempts failed, and eventually the Arabia was completely covered by water. Over time, the river shifted a half a mile to the east. The site of the sinking is in a field in the area of present-day Kansas City, Kansas.

In the 1860s, Elisha Sortor purchased the property where the Arabia lay. Over the years, legends were passed through the family that it was located somewhere under the land. In the surrounding town, stories were also told of it, but the exact location of it was lost over time.

In 1987, Bob Hawley and his sons, Greg and David, set out to find the Arabia. They used old maps and a proton magnetometer to figure out the probable location, and finally discovered it half a mile from the modern location of the river under 45 feet of silt and topsoil.

The owners of the farm gave permission for excavation, with the condition that the work be completed before the spring planting. The Hawleys, along with family friends Jerry Mackey and David Luttrell, set out to excavate the Arabia during the winter months while the water table was at its lowest point. They performed a series of drilling tests to determine the exact location of the hull, then marked the perimeter with powdered chalk. Heavy equipment, including a 100-ton crane, was brought in by both river and road transport during the summer and fall. 20 irrigation pumps were installed around the site to lower the water level and to keep the site from flooding. The 65-foot deep wells removed 20,000 US gallons per minute from the ground.

On November 26, 1988, the Arabia was exposed. Four days later, artifacts from it began to appear, beginning with a Goodyear rubber overshoe. On December 5, a wooden crate filled with elegant china was unearthed. The mud was such an effective preserver that the yellow packing straw was still visible. Thousands of artifacts were recovered intact, including jars of preserved food that are still edible. The artifacts that were recovered are housed in the Arabia Steamboat Museum.

On February 11, 1989, work ceased at the site, and the pumps were turned off. The hole filled with water overnight. After the pumps were turned off, the site was filled back in and remains farmland.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Here's a mule saddle by Joseph Gee. The rings at the back are to attach a breeching (sometimes called a "britchin") which keeps the saddle from sliding forward. Mules have a flatter back than horses.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Here's a mule saddle showing how the breeching is attached.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Panorama Point also known as Constable Mountain, is the highest natural point in Nebraska, at an elevation of 5,429 feet above sea level. It is located in southwestern Kimball County, near the point where Nebraska and Wyoming meet on Colorado's northern boundary. Despite its name and elevation, Panorama Point is not a mountain or a hill; it is merely a low rise on the High Plains. A stone marker, giving the elevation at 5,424 feet and a guest register are located at the summit of the drive. From the point one can see the nearby state corner marker, and a vast plains landscape with the Rocky Mountains in the western distance. Panorama Point is located on the High Point Bison Ranch, which permits visitors to drive to the site as long as they take care to avoid the ranging bison and pay an entrance fee.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Great western character actors:
Francis M. Gerstle (September 27, 1915 – February 23, 1970) was an American actor, well known for his performances in a series of science-fiction films.

Gerstle was born in New York City. He appeared in 60 films between 1950 and 1970, 110 television series and programs between 1951 and 1970. His notable appearances included Outside the Wall. In television, he appeared in The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show in the episode Surprise Birthday Party, he portrayed Dick Gird in 6 episodes of The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp. His final appearance was in the episode San Francisco International in San Francisco International Airport which aired on September 29, 1970.
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