Well, the board is either fixed, or it's going to run terribly. Cross your fingers and hope for the best. I'm at my technical limit right now.

Spurs and the Great West

Message
Author
User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1440
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1336 Post by nrobertb » Thu Nov 07, 2019 12:00 am

The Musselshell River is a tributary of the Missouri River, 341.9 miles long from its origins at the confluence of its North and South Forks near Martinsdale, Montana to its mouth on the Missouri River. It is located east of the Continental divide entirely within Montana in the United States. Counting its pre-confluence tributaries, it measures 425–500 miles in length.

It rises in several forks in the Crazy, Little Belt, and Castle mountains in central Montana. The main branch is formed by the confluence of the North Fork and South Fork in Meagher County, about 25 miles east of White Sulphur Springs, Montana, just east of Martinsdale, north of Martinsdale Reservoir, and just west of Meagher County's border with Wheatland County. The North Fork flows south from the Little Belt Mountains through Bair Reservoir, then southeast. The South Fork flows northeast from the Crazy Mountains. From the confluence of these two waterways, the main branch flows roughly due east past Two Dot, Harlowton, and Roundup, then turns north just past Melstone, and continues to the UL Bend on the Missouri River at the beginning of Fort Peck Reservoir.

The Musselshell River has also been known as: Cockkleshell River, Mahtush-ahzhah, Muscleshell River, Mustleshell River, Shell River. The Musselshell was entered by the Lewis and Clark Expedition on May 20, 1805 and named by them for the freshwater mussels lining the bank, noting in their journals that the Minnetare people had given the waterway a similar name. The Blackfeet, who hunted buffalo and prepared the meat for winter in the Musselshell area, called it the Dried Meat River.

Fishing is popular along most parts of the Musselshell. Species of fish found on the North and/or South Forks down to Harlowton include: mountain whitefish, and brown, cutthroat, rainbow, and brook trout. The eastern part of the river has channel catfish, sauger, smallmouth bass, and walleye due to the warmer water caused by dewatering from irrigation and the arid climate shift from mountain to prairie ecosystems in the Musselshell's last 90 miles. There are three different species of freshwater mussels as well as crawdads.

The Musselshell region is where the last surviving herds of wild American buffalo lived. Zoologist William Temple Hornaday of the Smithsonian Institution harvested specimens from the region in 1886 so that future generations would know what the buffalo looked like. mThe Musselshell was mentioned by both Del Gue and Jeremiah Johnson in the film Jeremiah Johnson. Roundup is home to the Musselshell Valley Historical Museum, which documents the region's history.
Attachments
Musselshell river.jpg
Musselshell river.jpg (20.24 KiB) Viewed 1111 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1440
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1337 Post by nrobertb » Thu Nov 07, 2019 8:06 pm

Some modern flint nappers are as skilled as the ancient peoples at creating blades and weapons. Here are some works by Knapped Inspirations.
Attachments
knapped inspirations.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1440
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1338 Post by nrobertb » Fri Nov 08, 2019 10:50 am

Here's a nice knife by Jeff Peters at Old Wolf Forge.
Attachments
jeff peters chaf knife.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1440
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1339 Post by nrobertb » Sat Nov 09, 2019 9:36 am

A modern replica of a fancy Santa Fe style saddle, ca. 1838.
Attachments
1838 fancy Santa Fe.jpg
1838 fancy Santa Fe.jpg (19.1 KiB) Viewed 1038 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1440
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1340 Post by nrobertb » Sat Nov 09, 2019 11:09 pm

The cinch or girth is the piece of equipment that actually holds the saddle on the horses back. It can be referred to as a girth or a cinch. It is very important to have a cinch that fits the horse correctly. They come in many sizes but the most common size used is a 32 inch. You can get many different types of cinches from a rope cinch (the white cinches shown above), neoprene (black cinch shown above) or different types of felts. It is a matter of preference or comfort for the horse when choosing the style of cinch. Be careful when using neoprene because it can rub a horse and cause sores.
Attachments
SaddleGirthCinches.jpg
SaddleGirthCinches.jpg (51.35 KiB) Viewed 1028 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1440
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1341 Post by nrobertb » Sun Nov 10, 2019 5:42 pm

A Cerillos turquoise ring from the 1930's.
Attachments
Cerilllos 1930s.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1440
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1342 Post by nrobertb » Mon Nov 11, 2019 9:42 am

While driving in New Mexico this fall, we saw a sign by the roadside for kneel down bread and wondered what it was. Here's the answer:

Also known as Navajo tamales, kneel down bread is baked in a corn husk. It used to be made in bulk after the corn harvest and stored over the winter like a hard cracker. One old recipe reads as follows: “Scrape the kernels from fresh corn cobs and grind on a metate until mushy. Wrap in several layers of corn husks. Place in the ashes of a wood fire and cover with fresh corn husks or leaves to seal in the heat and steam. Cover with a layer of moist dirt, then a layer of hot coals. Stoke a small fire over all the layers and bake the breads about 1 hour. Remove the packets from the ash pit, peel off the husks, and eat hot.”
Attachments
bread.jpg
bread.jpg (44.58 KiB) Viewed 988 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1440
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1343 Post by nrobertb » Tue Nov 12, 2019 10:23 am

The Pawnee Bill Ranch, also known as the Blue Hawk Peak Ranch, was the home of Wild West show entertainer, Gordon W. "Pawnee Bill" Lillie. Located in Pawnee, Oklahoma, it is owned and operated by the Oklahoma Historical Society. The Pawnee Bill Ranch consists of 500 of the original 2000 acres, original outbuildings, a fully furnished historic home, a modern museum, and a herd of bison, Longhorn cattle, and horses.

Pawnee Bill believed strongly in the importance of the bison to the history of the American West and to the Plains Indian culture. He desired to perpetuate and develop the bison and lobbied congress to pass legislation to protect the animal. This was the beginning of the ranch's time as a bison preservation. The ranch is an active member of the Oklahoma Bison Association today.

In December 1910, Lillie and his wife May's dream of a home on top of a hill overlooking a bend in the Black Bear River was realized. The building of their Tudor-style Arts and Crafts home was completed after nearly a year of construction. James Hamilton, an architect from Chester, Pennsylvania, designed the home with input from Lillie and his wife. The home was a beautiful crafted residence, both comfortable and modern. Area laborers worked to construct the nearly 5,300 square feet home from native stone quarried from the Ranch grounds.

Between the years of 1910 and 1926, many other buildings were added to the ranch site. Between 1910 and 1913 the carriage house, log cabin, blacksmith shop, and observation tower were added to the site by the Lillies to accommodate their growing businesses. In 1926, to meet the need for larger livestock accommodations, the Lillies built an impressive three story barn. The barn housed Pawnee Bill's herd of Scottish Shorthorn cattle. Its basement level sheltered the ranch horses while the second floor provided housing for the cattle. The top was used as storage for alfalfa and other feed crops harvested from the ranch property.

On October 10, 1975, the site was included on the National Register of Historic Places under the original title of Blue Hawk Peak Ranch.

Since 1962, Blue Hawk Peak has been owned by the State of Oklahoma. Now operated by the Oklahoma Historical Society, Pawnee Bill Ranch, as it is known today, is open as a historic site dedicated to the preservation and interpretation of history as it relates to Pawnee Bill and May. The site also houses exhibits on ranching, Wild West shows, and the American Indian experience in the Wild West show. In 1970, a museum was built on the site to house the Western collection as well as provide an educational experience for visitors. Open year-round, the Pawnee Bill Ranch provides educational programming for adults and children as well as a yearly re-enactment of Pawnee Bill's Historic Wild West Show.
Attachments
pawneebill2.jpg
pawneebill.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1440
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1344 Post by nrobertb » Tue Nov 12, 2019 11:25 pm

A Texas Hope saddle from the 1800's.
Attachments
1800's Texas Hope saddle.jpg
1800's Texas Hope saddle.jpg (8.17 KiB) Viewed 930 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1440
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1345 Post by nrobertb » Wed Nov 13, 2019 11:49 am

The Animas River rises high in San Juan Mountains of Colorado at the confluence of the West and North forks at the ghost town of Animas Forks and flows south past the ghost towns of Eureka and Howardsville. At Silverton, the river flows into the Animas Canyon. The Durango and Silverton Narrow gauge railroad follows the river through the canyon to Durango. From Durango the river flows south into New Mexico through the town of Aztec to its confluence with the San Juan River at Farmington. The only major tributary of the Animas River is the Florida River which confluences just north of the Colorado–New Mexico border.

The ancestral Puebloan site of Aztec Ruins National Monument is situated along the river in the present day town of Aztec and for much of its course the river flows through native Ute and Navajo lands.

Numerous irrigation ditches serve the surrounding farmland along the river. The Durango Pumping Plant, completed in 2011, as part of the Animas-La Plata Water Project, draws an average annual of 57,100 acre-feet from the river, for storage in Lake Nighthorse.

The Animas serves as habitat to resident and migratory bald eagles which arrive in the winter months to take advantage of the ice-free river.
Attachments
animas river.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1440
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1346 Post by nrobertb » Wed Nov 13, 2019 11:36 pm

Here are a couple of pairs of North & Judd spurs.
Attachments
North&Judd6.jpg
North&Judd6.jpg (41.38 KiB) Viewed 851 times
North&Judd3.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1440
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1347 Post by nrobertb » Thu Nov 14, 2019 4:15 pm

The Dolores River is a tributary of the Colorado River, approximately 241 miles long, in the U.S. states of Colorado and Utah. The river drains a rugged and arid region of the Colorado Plateau west of the San Juan Mountains. Its name derives from the Spanish El Rio de Nuestra Señora de Dolores, River of Our Lady of Sorrows. The river was explored and possibly named by Juan Maria Antonio Rivera during a 1765 expedition from Santa Fe.

The Dolores River rises in a meadow called Tin Can Basin, near 12,520-foot Hermosa Peak in the San Miguel Mountains, in Dolores County, Colorado. The headwaters are located about 5 miles south of Lizard Head Pass in the San Juan National Forest. The river flows southwest in a canyon past Rico, receiving the West Dolores River, then flows into McPhee Reservoir near Dolores in Montezuma County. Formed by McPhee Dam, the reservoir is about 10 miles long and diverts flows of the upper Dolores River for irrigation.

Downstream from McPhee Dam, the river re-enters Dolores County and carves the Dolores River Canyon, which stretches north for over 40 miles and averages 1,100 feet deep. This section of the Dolores River is noted for its exposed sedimentary strata, desert wildlife, and during years of heavy snowmelt for its whitewater. Near Egnar the river crosses into San Miguel County and then from there into Montrose County.

Continuing north, the Dolores cuts across the Paradox Valley which runs in an unusual transverse direction to the river. Immediately below Paradox Valley it is joined by the San Miguel River, its main tributary, from the east. Below the confluence with the San Miguel, the Dolores enters Mesa County, flowing north-northwest past Gateway and then turning west into Utah. The last segment of the river, entirely within Grand County, joins the Colorado near the historic Dewey Bridge, about 30 miles above Moab.

The ancestral Dolores River is believed to have flowed south to join the San Juan River near the Four Corners in what is now northwestern New Mexico. The uplift of Sleeping Ute Mountain about 70 million years ago diverted the Dolores River to its present northward course, causing it to carve the Dolores River Canyon on its way to the Colorado River, creating unusual geologic features such as the Paradox Valley. The Dolores Canyon exposes rocks ranging from 300-million-year-old Pennsylvanian limestone to the 140-million-year-old Entrada sandstone deposited during the Jurassic. A cap of Cretaceous Dakota sandstone forms most of the upper rim of the canyon.

The lower Dolores River may have once been the original course of the Colorado River, which flowed through the now dry Unaweep Canyon, currently occupied by West Creek, a small tributary of the Dolores. When the Uncompahgre Plateau was formed it diverted the larger Colorado northwards through what is now the Grand Valley, looping around through Westwater Canyon to the confluence with the Dolores in eastern Utah and leaving Unaweep Canyon as a huge dry gap across the plateau.
Attachments
Dolores_River_(2008).jpg
Dolores_River_(2008).jpg (71.55 KiB) Viewed 800 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1440
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1348 Post by nrobertb » Fri Nov 15, 2019 1:37 pm

The Buffalo Bill Boyhood Home was built by Isaac Cody, the father of Buffalo Bill Cody in 1841 at LeClaire, Iowa. The house was purchased as a tourist attraction by the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad and was moved to Cody, Wyoming, Buffalo Bill's adopted hometown, in 1933.

The house was placed at the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy's Cody station to provide an attraction for tourists stopping in Cody on their way to or from Yellowstone National Park. Of necessity, groups had to spend the night at Cody, in the railroad's Burlington Inn next to the station, about two miles from town. The house was meant to provide the travelers with a diversion that would not require a trip into town. By 1947 the rail tour business was declining and the Burlington Inn was to be demolished. The Cody House was given to the Buffalo Bill Memorial Association and moved to its final location at the Buffalo Bill Museum in Cody. The house was again moved in 1969 when the museum moved into the Buffalo Bill Historical Center across the street from the old museum. The house is the oldest structure in the town of Cody, and may be the oldest building in Wyoming.

The two-story frame house has two rooms downstairs and two upstairs. A lean-to kitchen addition to the rear did not make the journey from Iowa to Wyoming. The house is constructed of sawn lumber with larger hand-hewn timbers.

The Cody House was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1975.
Attachments
Isaac_Cody_House,_1034_North_Cody_Street_(moved_to_720_Sheridan_Avenue,_Cody,_WY).jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1440
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1349 Post by nrobertb » Sat Nov 16, 2019 11:38 pm

An old pawn squash blossom necklace:
Attachments
old pawn.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1440
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1350 Post by nrobertb » Sun Nov 17, 2019 9:30 pm

1950's Kelly dogleg spurs.
Attachments
1950's Kelly dogleg spurs.jpg
1950's Kelly dogleg spurs.jpg (32.37 KiB) Viewed 680 times

Post Reply

Return to “General Off Topic”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests