Spurs and the Great West

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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Timeline
History >> Westward Expansion

1767: Daniel Boone explores Kentucky for the first time.

1803: Louisiana Purchase - President Thomas Jefferson buys the Louisiana Territory from France for $15 million. This doubles the size of the United States and provides a large area to the west of the country for expansion.

1805: Lewis and Clark reach the Pacific Ocean - Explorers Lewis and Clark map out areas of the Louisiana Purchase and eventually reach the Pacific Ocean.

1830: Indian Removal Act - Congress passes a law to move Native Americans from the Southeast to the west of the Mississippi River.

1836: Battle of the Alamo - Mexican troops attack the Alamo Mission killing all but two Texans. This spurs the Texans on in the Texas Revolution.

1838: Trail of Tears - The Cherokee Nation is forced to march from the east coast to Oklahoma. Many thousands die along the way.

1841: Oregon Trail - People begin to travel west in wagon trains on the Oregon Trail. Around 300,000 people would take the trail over the next 20 years.

1845: Manifest Destiny - Journalist John O'Sullivan first uses the term "Manifest Destiny" to describe the westward expansion of the United States.

1845: Texas becomes a U.S. State - The United States officially claims Texas as a state, eventually leading to the Mexican-American War.

1846: Brigham Young leads 5,000 Mormons to Utah - After experiencing religious persecution, the Mormons move to Salt Lake City, Utah.

1846-1848: The Mexican-American War - A war fought over the rights to Texas. After the war, the United States paid Mexico $15 million for land that would later become California, Texas, Arizona, Nevada, Utah, and parts of several other states.

1846: Oregon Treaty - England signs the Oregon Treaty handing over the Oregon Territory to the United States.

1848: Gold Rush begins - James Marshall discovers gold at Sutter's Mill. Soon word is out and people rush to California to strike it rich.

1849: Around 90,000 "Forty-niners" move to California to find gold.

1860: The Pony Express begins to deliver mail.

1861: The First Transcontinental Telegraph line is finished. The Pony Express shuts down.

1862: Pacific Railroad Act - The United States government agrees to help fund a railroad from California to Missouri.

1862: Homestead Act - The U.S. government offers up free land to farmers who agree to live on the land for five years and make improvements to the land. Many people rush to places like Oklahoma to claim their land.

1869: The Transcontinental Railroad is completed - The Union Pacific Railroad and the Central Pacific Railroads meet at Promontory, Utah and the railroad is completed.

1872: Yellowstone National Park is dedicated as the nation's first national park by President Ulysses S. Grant.

1874: Black Hills Gold - Gold is discovered in the Black Hills of South Dakota.

1874: Barbed wire invented - Ranchers can now use barbed wire fences to keep their cattle from ranging free.

1876: Wild Bill Hickok is shot and killed while playing poker in Deadwood, South Dakota.

1876: Battle of Little Bighorn - An American Indian army composed of Lakota, Northern Cheyenne, and Arapahoe defeat General Custer and the 7th Calvary.

1890: The U.S. Government announces that the Western lands have been explored.

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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Great western character actors: Andrew Prine, a well-known stage actor also known for military/western dramas, was first seen in Kiss Her Goodbye (1959), then in The Miracle Worker (1962). Prine, who has a Texan sounding voice, was also well remembered in westerns like Texas Across the River (1966), Generation (1969) and Chisum (1970), which featured his close and well known friends Christopher George, John Wayne and Richard Jaeckel. Prine next starred in Simon, King of the Witches (1971), One Little Indian (1973), The Centerfold Girls (1974) and Grizzly (1976), which also featured Christopher George and Richard Jaeckel. Prine also wrote his own little dialogue story for Grizzly (1976). During this time through the 60s and 70s, Prine was married four times but kept his acting career up. Prine later was in The Evil (1978), Amityville II: The Possession (1982), Eliminators (1986), Chill Factor (1989) and Gettysburg (1993), which got Prine a big and great role. Prine is a great veteran actor in Hollywood who will always be remembered. He has also been in over 30 great films and made 79 guest appearances.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Some spurs, maker unknown:
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Golden Gate Canyon State Park is a Colorado State Park located in Gilpin and Jefferson counties northwest of Golden, Colorado. The 11,998-acre Front Range park established in 1960 has 36 miles of hiking trails. Horse and bicycle travel is allowed on 22 miles. Facilities include a visitors center, over 100 campsites and over 100 picnic sites

Wetland and riparian plant communities are found along Ralston, Nott and Deer creeks and small ponds within the park. Ponderosa pine, Rocky Mountain juniper, Douglas fir and aspen are found in forested areas. Commonly seen wildlife includes mule deer, elk, black bear, mountain lion, Abert's squirrel and pine squirrel. Visitors also occasionally spot moose, which are increasing in the park. Common birds include turkey vulture, Steller's jay, Clark's nutcracker, mountain bluebird and mountain chickadee.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Master Weaver: Frances Begay
Frances started weaving in 1982 when she was 26 years old. Her grandmother Mary Begay taught her how to weave and her Aunt Sara Begay taught her the Crystal design.

My grandma thought I could carry on what she taught me. Weaving makes me think of tradition and spirit. I always think of my late grandmother and Aunt when I weave. They were a major influence in my life.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Great western character actors: Phillip Pine was born on July 16, 1920 in Hanford, California, USA. He was an actor and writer, known for The Cat Ate the Parakeet (1972), Posse from Heaven (1975) and The Twilight Zone (1959). He was married to Madelyn Conner Keen (Lynn Kenton). He died on December 22, 2006 in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA.

Dark-browed, shady-looking character actor known for playing serious-minded professionals and assorted menacers and mobsters, mostly on TV during the '50s, '60s and '70s.
Became interested in acting while in high school.
Remembered as the evil "Col. Green" on the original Star Trek (1966) TV series.
Worked on Ohio and Mississippi showboats during the early 1940s.
In both his appearances on the classic science-fiction anthology series The Twilight Zone (1959) and The Outer Limits (1963) he played men whose identities were usurped by characters with the ability to change their faces.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Great western character actors: She was your typical B-movie drive-in bad girl - sometimes blonde, sometimes brunette, always bodacious. A tease, a taunter and a temptress throughout most her career, Fay Spain was born in Phoenix, Arizona, in 1932. She headed to New York where she initially found summer stock work and a bit of television exposure. One of her earliest TV appearances was not as an actress but as a contestant on the TV game show You Bet Your Life (1950) starring Groucho Marx. By 1956, this fetching starlet was winning episodic roles on the more popular shows of the day, including Perry Mason (1957), Cheyenne (1955) and Gunsmoke (1955). She was also gaining notice on the covers of magazines. This cheesecake attention led directly to her juvenile delinquent debut in Dragstrip Girl (1957) with John Ashley and Steven Terrell, where she immediately established herself as the party girl boys are willing to race cars and fight over. Other equally cheap-jack films followed with Teenage Doll (1957), The Crooked Circle (1957), and The Abductors (1957). Fay made an aggressive move into higher quality films with Erskine Caldwell's best-seller God's Little Acre (1958), where she played "Darlin' Jill", another amoral sexpot, and as Rod Steiger's moll in Al Capone (1959), but then it was right back to Grade Z level work with The Beat Generation (1959) co-starring Mamie Van Doren, The Private Lives of Adam and Eve (1960) in which she tempts Martin Milner with the old forbidden fruit routine, and a 1962 Italian spectacle as an evil queen trying to thwart the actions of Hercules. Although Fay made some efforts to return to TV work, her career was pretty much over by the mid-60s. One of her last roles was a bit part as a mafioso matriarch in The Godfather: Part II (1974). Fay died of cancer at age 50 in 1983.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Lake Pepin is a naturally occurring lake on the Mississippi River on the border between the U.S. states of Minnesota and Wisconsin. It is located in a valley carved by the outflow of an enormous glacial lake at the end of the last Ice Age. The lake formed when the Mississippi, a successor to the glacial river, was partially dammed by a delta from a tributary stream and spread out across the ancient valley.

Lake Pepin has a surface area of about 40 square miles and an average depth of 21 feet, It is up to 2 miles wide and 22 miles long.

The wide area of the lake stretches from Bay City, Wisconsin, in the north, down to Reads Landing, Minnesota in the south. The villages of Pepin, Maiden Rock and Stockholm are on the Wisconsin side, while Frontenac State Park takes up a large part of the Minnesota side. The largest city on the waterfront is Lake City, Minnesota.

Maiden Rock, on Lake Pepin, is one site said to be the locale where a Dakota woman named Winona leapt to her death.[3][4]

Lake Pepin occupies a valley carved by the waters of Glacial River Warren, which drained Lake Agassiz in a catastrophic flood at the end of the last Ice Age, and to a lesser extent from Lake Duluth, a smaller glacial lake which drained through the present valley of the St. Croix River. When the continental glacier's meltwaters found other outlets to the sea, River Warren was succeeded by the more modest Upper Mississippi, which drains a much smaller basin, and the St. Croix spillway became the present river. Over a long period of time, the deep valley was partially filled with sediments, forming a broad floodplain. In this plain Lake Pepin formed behind a delta comprising sediments deposited into the ancient lake bed by the Chippewa River near the present community of Wabasha at the southern end of the lake. The lake backed up behind this sediment dam as far north as the location of Saint Paul. In the 10,000 years since the lake's creation, ongoing sedimentation into Lake Pepin has caused its upper end to migrate downstream some 50mi to its present location east (river direction south) of Red Wing, Minnesota.

The lake was first named in a map of New France made by Guillaume Delisle at the request of Louis XIV of France in 1703. The lake was named for Jean Pepin who settled on its shores in the late 1600s after exploring the Great Lakes from Boucherville.

Nicolas Perrot erected the first of a number of fur trade posts, Fort Saint Antoine, in 1686. In 1727 René Boucher de La Perrière and Michel Guignas built Fort Beauharnois on the lake. In 1730 it had to be rebuilt on higher ground. Boucher was the military leader and Father Guignas was a missionary to the Sioux.

In the nineteenth century the lake was used to transport freshly-cut trees for the lumber industry. Cut logs were floated across the lake, from the 1840s often with the assistance of steamboats to counter adverse winds and the sluggish currents in the lake. Large rafts were assembled at Reads Landing at the southern end, and towed downstream to mills at Winona and St. Louis.

In 1890 it was the site of one of the worst maritime disasters on the Mississippi, known as the Sea Wing disaster when the Sea Wing ferry capsized in a bad storm, killing 98 people.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Elsie Bia, “My favorite designs are Burntwater, Wide Ruin, Ganado Red and Teec Nos Pos. Weaving rugs is a Navajo tradition and it is passed down by my family, and I Love to weave. It is my only income and it helps me a lot. Awards: 3 Best of Category Awards; 6- 1st Place Ribbons; 2 – Artist Awards and many smaller awards.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Some August Buermann spurs.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Salt Point State Park is in Sonoma Count, Cal.with a rough rocky coast line including Salt Point which protrudes into the Pacific Ocean. The park also features the first underwater preserves in California. The activities at Salt Point include hiking, camping, fishing, scuba diving and many others. The weather is cool with fog and cold winds even during the summer.

The rocks of Salt Point are sedimentary sandstone. Due to the large amounts of sandstone, small cave-like features called tafoni can be found along the shore of Salt Point.

This park is named for the formation of salt crystals in the cracks and crevices of the rocky coastline. The native Kashaya Pomo collected salt from this area for many years. They used abalone chisels to scrape the salt off the rocks.

In 1853, Samuel Duncan and Joshua Hendy built a sawmill on a ridge located above Salt Point. A couple of years later they leased the land to a San Francisco company which quarried the sandstone. They used the sandstone to create the streets and buildings in San Francisco along with the naval facility at Mare Island. It is also possible to see drill holes in the sandstone at Gerstle Cove and at the marine terrace just north of it. In 1870, Duncan sold his property to Frederick Funcke and Lewis Gerstle. They shipped 5,000 cords of wood yearly and used most of the land to graze their cattle.

The eyebolts used to anchor ships down are still visible at Gerstle cove. This is where sandstone and wood were loaded onto cargo ships. At first, they used wire cables anchored to the cliff side to load wood and stone onto the ships. Two chutes were eventually made; the Miller chute and the Funcke & Co. chute. There was a horse-drawn railroad that lead from the Miller sawmills to where the boats were loaded. The sawmill had a daily capacity of 18,000 board feet .

Brush and grasslands cover the ground on the marine terraces; at higher elevations (approximately 100 to 300 feet in elevation) Douglas fir forest dominates. At slightly higher staircase levels (about 300 to 500 feet, a mixed fir forest of bishop pine and Douglas-fir is present intermixed with second growth coast redwood, madrones and tanoak. At 1,000 feet there is a large open prairie where animals such as elk previously grazed. In addition, at an elevation of about 550 feet within Salt Point State Park is a pygmy forest including the Mendocino cypress, bishop pine and Arctostaphylos. The reason these trees do not attain their normal height is due to the highly acidic soils with minimal nutrients and a hardpan layer close to the surface.

The native animals that roam the land include the black-tailed deer, raccoon, coyote, bobcat, gray fox, badger, striped skunk, and dozens of varieties of rodents such as squirrels, chipmunks, and the field mouse. Bears and cougars occasionally range the area, although visitors rarely see them.

The forest, grassland, and ocean shore area host a huge variety of birds, including pelicans, ospreys, woodpeckers (including the pileated woodpecker), and oystercatchers. Steller's jay and ravens are common in unattended campsites in search of food.

During April, kelp is not visible but it has already started to grow. By August, the water is full of dark green seaweed that will provide a habitat for a variety of rockfish and other marine organisms. The coast of Sonoma County is known for its slow-growing red abalone. It takes this abalone 10 years to reach a diameter of seven inches (178 mm). Between the months of December and April, it is possible to see gray whales migrating south to Baja California for breeding.

Stewarts Point State Marine Reserve & Stewarts Point State Marine Conservation Area, Salt Point State Marine Conservation Area and Gerstle Cove State Marine Reserve adjoin Salt Point State Park. Like underwater parks, these marine protected areas help conserve ocean wildlife and marine ecosystems.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Cheyenne Sun Dance pledgers, about 1911.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Great western character actors: Harlan Warde (born Harlan Ward Lufkin; November 6, 1917 – March 13, 1980) was a character actor active in television and movies. During World War II, he served in Special Forces.

Warde showed up in supporting roles as detectives, doctors, and ministers. Warde made five guest appearances on Perry Mason between 1958-1966, primarily in law enforcement roles, such as Assistant District Attorney Harold Hanley in "The Case of the Haunted Husband", and Sgt. Roddin in the only color episode in 1966 entitled, "The Case of the Twice Told Twist". From 1958–62, he joined Chuck Connors in The Rifleman. Warde played John Hamilton, President of the North Fork Bank. He appeared in eighteen episodes of The Rifleman, making his debut in episode 8, “The Safeguard.” Over his 40-year-career in Hollywood, Warde appeared in over 180 films and television series, including multiple westerns. [

Warde was cast in the historical role of future United States Secretary of War Edwin Stanton in the 1961 episode, "The Stolen City," on the syndicated anthology series, Death Valley Days, hosted by Stanley Andrews. In the story line, Stanton works with apothecary Zacharias Gurney (Darren McGavin) to prove that a Mexican document transferring San Francisco to a man named Limantour (Gregory Morton) is fraudulent.

From 1962 to 1971, Warde was a member of the cast of the TV Western series The Virginian in the recurring role of Sheriff Brannon. Warde also appeared on The Big Valley in 1967 as a politician who is murdered in the episode entitled "Night Of The Executioner" and as Simon Winkler in "Opie and the Spoiled Kid" (1963), an episode of The Andy Griffith Show. Warde's last role was in the 1979 Rockford Files episode "A Different Drummer" playing an aging father of a shady doctor.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Back in the old days, many cowboys were using horses that had been caught wild, so they had to be "broken". That is, ridden until they were so exhausted they couldn't buck any more.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Cowboys didn't ride the same horse two days in a row, but let it rest. They had a "string" of two or more horses so they could alternate. It was a morning chore to ride out the bucking on these half wild horses.
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