Well, the board is either fixed, or it's going to run terribly. Cross your fingers and hope for the best. I'm at my technical limit right now.

Spurs and the Great West

Message
Author
User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1333
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1081 Post by nrobertb » Sat Apr 06, 2019 5:16 pm

Great western character actors:
Richard Devon wanted to be an actor from the time he was in first grade and played a small part in a school production. After finishing high school he answered a small ad in a Los Angeles newspaper for a school that offered training to the novice actor. This drama school, "Stage Eight", allowed him to work his way through, as he hadn't the money for tuition. He painted walls, built sets, waxed floors and strung lights. It was during this time that he made his first live television appearance for the experimental TV station W6XAO, atop Mt. Lee in the Hollywood Hills. Amidst much additional work in TV, Devon also played a recurring character in the kiddie-oriented teleseries Space Patrol (1950) (when Devon asked for a pay hike, his character was put into permanent suspended animation). He made his first film in the early '50s.
Attachments
devon2.jpg
devon.jpg
devon.jpg (7.48 KiB) Viewed 1649 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1333
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1082 Post by nrobertb » Sun Apr 07, 2019 9:56 pm

More spurs: these are by Blanchard, with the typical wide heel band and narrow shank.
Attachments
Blanch8.jpg
Blanch8.jpg (49.91 KiB) Viewed 1636 times
Blanch4.jpg
Blanch4.jpg (10.61 KiB) Viewed 1636 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1333
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1083 Post by nrobertb » Mon Apr 08, 2019 9:45 am

Here's a nice old Navajo rug. The twisted cross is an ancient symbol used by many cultures.
Attachments
Navajo-Rug-with-Whirling-Logs-001-large.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1333
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1084 Post by nrobertb » Mon Apr 08, 2019 5:19 pm

This is a circa 1920 saddle by H.H. Heiser of Denver. Note the metal horn.
\
Attachments
hhheiser.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1333
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1085 Post by nrobertb » Tue Apr 09, 2019 3:05 pm

Here is a Vintage Navajo Silver Concho Belt handcrafted about 1930. This belt was made with Sterling Silver which was fairly rare out on the reservation, but, available in the towns such as Flagstaff, Gallup and Albuquerque. Indian Trading Posts on the reservation began to carry Sterling Silver in sheet, wire and solder forms around this period. This is another way we can date Antique or Vintage Navajo Silver Jewelry. This Vintage piece of Navajo Jewelry was made from sheet Sterling Silver, the metal was stamped, reposed (bumped up from the back side) and domed to make the Silver Concho's three dimensional. Navajo Concho Belts and Navajo Bracelets were the most common pieces of Navajo Silver Jewelry made in the early years.
Attachments
old_navajo_link_concho_belt.a.jpg
old_navajo_link_concho_belt.a.jpg (15.4 KiB) Viewed 1595 times

xring3
Registered User
Registered User
Posts: 7
Joined: Mon Apr 01, 2019 7:31 am
Age: 69
Location: Woodward,Oklahoma
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1086 Post by xring3 » Tue Apr 09, 2019 3:16 pm

Image
Nothing rare where I live but it is western stuff


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
I think my last words are going to be.....hold my beer and watch this.

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1333
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1087 Post by nrobertb » Wed Apr 10, 2019 9:43 am

Pipe Spring National Monument is a United States National Monument located in the U.S. state of Arizona, rich with American Indian, early explorer, and Mormon pioneer history. Administered by the National Park Service, Pipe Spring was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on October 15, 1966, and the boundaries of the Pipe Spring National Monument Historic District (a portion of the monument) were expanded in October 2000.

The water of Pipe Spring has made it possible for plants, animals, and people to live in this dry desert region. Ancestral Puebloans and Kaibab Paiute Indians gathered grass seeds, hunted animals, and raised crops near the springs for at least 1,000 years.

Antonio Armijo discovered the springs when he passed through the area in 1829, when he established by the Armijo Route of the Old Spanish Trail.

Pipe Spring was named by the 1858 expedition to the Hopi mesas led by Jacob Hamblin. In the 1860s pioneers from St. George, Utah, led by James M. Whitmore brought cattle to the area, and a large cattle ranching operation was established. In 1866 the Apache, Navajo and Paiute tribes of the region joined the Utes for the Black Hawk War, and, after they raided Pipe Spring, a protective fort was constructed by 1872 over the main spring. e following year the fort and ranch was purchased by Brigham Young. Anson Perry Winsor, was hired to operate the ranch and maintain the fort, soon called Winsor Castle. This isolated outpost served as a way station for people traveling across the Arizona Strip, that part of Arizona separated from the rest of the state by the Grand Canyon.

Although their way of life was greatly impacted by settlement, the Paiute Indians continued to live in the area and by 1907 the Kaibab Paiute Indian Reservation was established, surrounding the privately owned Pipe Spring ranch. In 1923, the Pipe Spring ranch was purchased and set aside as a national monument to be a memorial to western pioneer life.

Today the Pipe Spring National Monument, Kaibab Band of Paiute Indians Visitor Center, and Museum explain the human history of the area over time. Daily tours of Winsor Castle, summer "living history" demonstrations, an orchard and garden, and a half-mile trail offer a glimpse of American Indian and pioneer life in the Old West. The Paiute tribe runs a small adjoining campground.
Attachments
Pipe_Spring_NM01.jpg
Pipe_Spring.JPG

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1333
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1088 Post by nrobertb » Wed Apr 10, 2019 5:06 pm

Back in the day Sears Roebuck used to sell a line of inexpensive saddles. Here's one of theirs from the 1920's.
Attachments
Sears.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1333
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1089 Post by nrobertb » Thu Apr 11, 2019 9:29 am

Myra Maybelle Shirley Reed Starr (February 5, 1848 – February 3, 1889), better known as Belle Starr, was a notorious American outlaw.

Belle associated with the James–Younger Gang and other outlaws. She was convicted of horse theft in 1883. She was fatally shot in 1889 in a case that is still officially unsolved.

Belle Starr was born Myra Maybelle Shirley on her father's farm near Carthage, Missouri, on February 5, 1848. Most of her family members called her May. Her father, John Shirley, prospered raising wheat, corn, hogs and horses, though he was considered to be the "black sheep" of a well-to-do Virginia family which had moved west to Indiana, where he married and divorced twice. Her mother, Elizabeth "Eliza" Hatfield Shirley, was John Shirley's third wife and a distant relative to the Hatfields of the famous family feud. In the 1860s, Belle's father sold the farm and moved the family to Carthage, where he bought an inn, livery stable and blacksmith shop on the town square.

After a Union attack on Carthage in 1864, the Shirleys moved to Scyene, Texas. She knew the Youngers and the James boys because she had grown up with them in Missouri. Her brother, John A.M. "Bud" Shirley, was called Captain Shirley by local Confederate sympathizers. He does not appear on any list of Quantrill's Raiders, but rode with a group who were called partisans by some and bushwhackers by Union sympathizers. Bud Shirley was killed in 1864 in Sarcoxie, Missouri while he and another scout were eating at the home of a Confederate sympathizer. Union troops surrounded the house, and when Bud attempted to escape, he was shot and killed.

Following the war, the Reed family also moved to Scyene and May Shirley married Jim Reed in 1866, after having had an earlier crush on him as a teen. Two years later, she gave birth to her first child, Rosie Lee (nicknamed Pearl). Belle always harbored a strong sense of style, which fed into her later legend. A crack shot, she used to ride sidesaddle while dressed in a black velvet riding habit and a plumed hat, carrying two pistols, with cartridge belts across her hips. Jim turned to crime and was wanted for murder in Arkansas, which caused the family to move to California, where their second child, James Edwin (Eddie), was born in 1871.

Later returning to Texas, Jim Reed was involved with several criminal gangs. While Jim initially tried his hand at farming, he would grow restless and fell in with bad company—the Starr clan, a Cherokee Indian family notorious for whiskey, cattle, and horse thievery in the Indian Territory (now Oklahoma), as well as his wife's old friends the James and Younger gangs. In April 1874, despite a lack of any evidence, a warrant was issued for her arrest for a stagecoach robbery by her husband and others. Jim Reed was killed in August of that year in Paris, Texas, where he had settled down with his family.

In 1880, she married a Cherokee man named Sam Starr and settled with the Starr family in the Indian Territory. There, she learned ways of organizing, planning and fencing for the rustlers, horse thieves and bootleggers, as well as harboring them from the law. Belle's illegal enterprises proved lucrative enough for her to employ bribery to free her cohorts from the law whenever they were caught.

In 1883, Belle and Sam were arrested by Bass Reeves, charged with horse theft and tried before "The Hanging Judge" Isaac Parker in Fort Smith, Arkansas; the prosecutor was United States Attorney W.H.H. Clayton. She was found guilty and served nine months at the Detroit House of Corrections in Detroit, Michigan. Belle proved to be a model prisoner, and during her time in jail, she won the respect of the prison matron, and in contrast, Sam was incorrigible and assigned to hard labor.

In 1886, she eluded conviction on another theft charge, but on December 17, Sam Starr was involved in a gunfight with Officer Frank West. Both men were killed, and Belle's life as an outlaw queen—and what had been the happiest relationship of her life—abruptly ended with her husband's death.

For the last two-plus years of her life, gossips and scandal sheets linked her to a series of men with colorful names, including Jack Spaniard, Jim French and Blue Duck, after which, in order to keep her residence on Indian land, she married a relative of Sam Starr, Jim July Starr, who was some 15 years younger than she was.

On February 3, 1889, two days before her 41st birthday, she was killed. She was riding home from a neighbor's house in Eufaula, Oklahoma when she was ambushed. After she fell off her horse, she was shot again to make sure she was dead. Her death resulted from shotgun wounds to the back and neck and in the shoulder and face. Legend says she was shot with her own double barrel shotgun.

According to Frank "Pistol Pete" Eaton, her death was due to different circumstances. She had been attending a dance. Frank Eaton had been the last person to dance with Belle Starr when Edgar Watson, clearly intoxicated, had asked to dance with her. When Belle Starr declined, he later followed her. When on the way home, she stopped to give her horse a drink at a creek, he shot and killed her. According to Frank Eaton, Watson was tried, convicted and executed by hanging for the murder.

However, another story says that there were no witnesses and that no one ever was convicted of the murder. Suspects with apparent motive included her new husband and both of her children as well as Edgar J. Watson, one of her sharecroppers because he was afraid she was going to turn him in to the authorities as an escaped murderer from Florida with a price on his head. Watson, who was killed in 1910, was tried for her murder, but was acquitted, and the ambush has entered Western lore as "unsolved".
Attachments
Belle_Starr_full.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1333
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1090 Post by nrobertb » Thu Apr 11, 2019 4:38 pm

An old time cowboy braiding horsehair reins.
Attachments
.reins5.jpg

indy1919a4
Gun Nut
Gun Nut
Posts: 993
Joined: Sat Jun 10, 2017 12:23 pm
Age: 56
Location: Indianapolis, Indiana
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1091 Post by indy1919a4 » Thu Apr 11, 2019 4:53 pm

nrobertb wrote:
Thu Apr 11, 2019 4:38 pm
An old time cowboy braiding horsehair reins.
Oh hell yeah thats a old time Cowboy, Thats Tom Horn no less, and the photo was taken while he was in jail awaiting execution.. Supposedly he was hung with that rope..

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1333
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1092 Post by nrobertb » Fri Apr 12, 2019 5:45 pm

Great western character actors:
Frank Wolff started his career by acting in several Roger Corman films. However, Wolff had to travel to Europe to be successful. He was finally able to become a well known actor in Italy and Europe with his performance in Salvatore Giuliano (1962) and had roles in many European film productions. Moreover, Wolff became a major star in Spaghetti Westerns. His most famous, but briefest, performances was as Brett McBain, the friendly farmer in Sergio Leone's Once Upon a Time in the West (1968). He also brought much needed light relief as the sheriff in Sergio Corbucci's The Great Silence (1968). When the time of "Spaghetti-Westerns" was ending, Wolff had several roles in Italian crime movies. Other memorable performances were in Duccio Tessari's Giallo La morte risale a ieri sera (1970) or in one of Wolffs last performances as a police commissioner in Fernando Di Leo's Caliber 9 (1972). Sadly, the great actor suffered from depression and killed himself in the Hilton Hotel in Rome in December 1971.
Attachments
Wolff2.jpg
Wolff.jpg
Wolff.jpg (7.61 KiB) Viewed 1490 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1333
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1093 Post by nrobertb » Sat Apr 13, 2019 11:09 am

Here are a couple more pairs by August Buermann.
Attachments
Buerma8.jpg
Buerma8.jpg (28.31 KiB) Viewed 1469 times
Buerma3.jpg
Buerma3.jpg (23.45 KiB) Viewed 1469 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1333
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1094 Post by nrobertb » Sat Apr 13, 2019 6:56 pm

Hoover Dam is a concrete arch-gravity dam in the Black Canyon of the Colorado River, on the border between the U.S. states of Nevada and Arizona. It was constructed between 1931 and 1936 during the Great Depression and was dedicated on September 30, 1935, by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Its construction was the result of a massive effort involving thousands of workers, and cost over one hundred lives. Originally known as Boulder Dam from 1933, it was officially renamed Hoover Dam, for President Herbert Hoover, by a joint resolution of Congress in 1947.

Since about 1900, the Black Canyon and nearby Boulder Canyon had been investigated for their potential to support a dam that would control floods, provide irrigation water and produce hydroelectric power. In 1928, Congress authorized the project. The winning bid to build the dam was submitted by a consortium called Six Companies, Inc., which began construction on the dam in early 1931. Such a large concrete structure had never been built before, and some of the techniques were unproven. The torrid summer weather and lack of facilities near the site also presented difficulties. Nevertheless, Six Companies turned the dam over to the federal government on March 1, 1936, more than two years ahead of schedule.

Hoover Dam impounds Lake Mead, the largest reservoir in the United States by volume (when it is full). The dam is located near Boulder City, Nevada, a municipality originally constructed for workers on the construction project, about 30 mi southeast of Las Vegas, Nevada. The dam's generators provide power for public and private utilities in Nevada, Arizona, and California. Hoover Dam is a major tourist attraction; nearly a million people tour the dam each year. The heavily traveled U.S. Route 93 (US 93) ran along the dam's crest until October 2010, when the Hoover Dam Bypass opened.
Attachments
250px-2017_Aerial_view_Hoover_Dam_4774.jpg
250px-2017_Aerial_view_Hoover_Dam_4774.jpg (22.1 KiB) Viewed 1456 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1333
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1095 Post by nrobertb » Sun Apr 14, 2019 8:10 pm

The Columbia River is the largest river in the Pacific Northwest region of North America. The river rises in the Rocky Mountains of British Columbia, Canada. It flows northwest and then south into the US state of Washington, then turns west to form most of the border between Washington and the state of Oregon before emptying into the Pacific Ocean. The river is 1,243 miles long, and its largest tributary is the Snake River. Its drainage basin is roughly the size of France and extends into seven US states and a Canadian province. The fourth-largest river in the United States by volume, the Columbia has the greatest flow of any North American river entering the Pacific.

The Columbia and its tributaries have been central to the region's culture and economy for thousands of years. They have been used for transportation since ancient times, linking the region's many cultural groups. The river system hosts many species of anadromous fish, which migrate between freshwater habitats and the saline waters of the Pacific Ocean. These fish—especially the salmon species—provided the core subsistence for native peoples.

In the late 18th century, a private American ship became the first non-indigenous vessel to enter the river; it was followed by a British explorer, who navigated past the Oregon Coast Range into the Willamette Valley. In the following decades, fur trading companies used the Columbia as a key transportation route. Overland explorers entered the Willamette Valley through the scenic but treacherous Columbia River Gorge, and pioneers began to settle the valley in increasing numbers. Steamships along the river linked communities and facilitated trade; the arrival of railroads in the late 19th century, many running along the river, supplemented these links.

Since the late 19th century, public and private sectors have heavily developed the river. To aid ship and barge navigation, locks have been built along the lower Columbia and its tributaries, and dredging has opened, maintained, and enlarged shipping channels. Since the early 20th century, dams have been built across the river for power generation, navigation, irrigation, and flood control. The 14 hydroelectric dams on the Columbia's main stem and many more on its tributaries produce more than 44 percent of total US hydroelectric generation.
Attachments
ColumbiaGorge_CapeHorn.jpg

Post Reply

Return to “General Off Topic”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests