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Spurs and the Great West

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indy1919a4
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#406 Post by indy1919a4 » Sun Jun 03, 2018 11:35 pm

I am assuming his pistol is in there.. Like how the holster is cut to cover the hammer... assumed for extra protection of the pistol.. Any clue to the year of the photo???

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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#407 Post by nrobertb » Mon Jun 04, 2018 10:54 am

I don't have a date for that photo.

Turquoise is an opaque, blue-to-green mineral that is a hydrated phosphate of copper and aluminium, with the chemical formula CuAl6(PO4)4(OH)8·4H2O. It is rare and valuable in finer grades and has been prized as a gemstone and ornamental stone for thousands of years owing to its unique hue. In recent times, turquoise has been devalued, like most other opaque gems, by the introduction onto the market of treatments, imitations and synthetics.

The word turquoise dates to the 17th century and is derived from the French turquois for "Turkish" because the mineral was first brought to Europe through Turkey, from mines in the historical Khorasan Province of Persia. It occurs as veins in volcanic rock and there are numerous mines in the American southwest.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#408 Post by nrobertb » Mon Jun 04, 2018 3:40 pm

Here are two American silver coins that were used a lot in Navajo silversmithing in the early days: the Liberty seated dollar, minted from 1840-73, and the Morgan dollar (named for its designer), minted from 1878-1904, and 1921.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#409 Post by nrobertb » Mon Jun 04, 2018 8:38 pm

Turquoises range from different shades of blue to shades of green. Some have matrix, others don’t. Even the matrix differs greatly in color and pattern.

Dry Creek Turquoise mine is located in Lander County, Nevada. It has gained popularity in recent years with its milky white and light blue coloring and brown matrix. Dry Creek is considered a rare stone, because the mine is currently closed. Dry Creek with brown matrix is the highest grade of this turquoise.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#410 Post by nrobertb » Tue Jun 05, 2018 12:09 am

A knife by David Kurt.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#411 Post by nrobertb » Tue Jun 05, 2018 9:45 am

Carico Lake turquoise ranges from beautiful shades of blue to lime green. The lime green color is due to the high levels of faustite and zinc. Although blue turquoise is the majority produced, in recent years lime green has been most valued for its rarity and unique color.

The Carico Lake Turquoise Mine is a historic mine named for its home on a dried up lake bed located in Lander County, Nevada. Due to the short amount of time it’s allowed to be mined each year, the supply of Carico Lake Turquoise is extremely limited.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#412 Post by nrobertb » Tue Jun 05, 2018 4:18 pm

The Zuni tribe, now located in northwestern New Mexico, was the second Native American group to learn Mexican silversmithing techniques. Navajo artist Atsidi Chon initially taught the art to a member of the Zuni tribe. Their artisans refined the Navajo cluster work technique, characterized by a series of shaped stones glued into bezel settings. Cluster work later evolved into the more intricate petit point and needlepoint styles.

Zuni craftspeople are renowned for their skill with inlay, a technique in which multiple stones are pieced together to form a single image. Colorful stones are cemented into channels created by soldering pieces of silver to a backing plate. The stones are then polished flat, resulting in a gorgeous multicolored figure with veins of silver running through it.

Turquoise and coral are among the stones frequently used in Zuni jewelry. Nineteenth and early twentieth century jewelry makers also made use of locally sourced materials such as lapis lazuli, malachite, spiny oyster shell and deer antler.

The jewelry item most commonly associated with the Zuni tribe is the fetish, a small animal carving traditionally worn for ceremonial or religious purposes. When a person wears a Zuni fetish, it is said that he or she is imbued with the characteristics of the animal.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#413 Post by nrobertb » Tue Jun 05, 2018 7:53 pm

Fox turquoise ranges from gorgeous shades of green to aqua blue. A majority of Fox turquoise come in nugget or vein form. It is very hard and suitable to be made into jewelry.

The Fox Turquoise Mine, located near Lander County, Nevada is one of the most famous and productive American turquoise mines and is still in operation today. Dowell Ward purchased the mine, along with a few others in the region in the 1940s. He named them Fox, White Horse, Green Tree and Smith to differentiate among the colors that were produced at these mines.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#414 Post by nrobertb » Wed Jun 06, 2018 8:35 am

A sample of Zuni fetishes.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#415 Post by nrobertb » Wed Jun 06, 2018 6:12 pm

Kingman turquoise is famous for having various sky blue color with characteristic veining.

The Kingman Turquoise Mine, located in Kingman, Arizona, is one of only three prehistoric mining sites in Arizona. It was discovered and mined by prehistoric Indians well over 1000 years ago. The Colbaugh family has owned and operated Kingman since the 1880s and is credited for discovering this ancient mine as well as the hammers left behind by the Indians.

The “high blue” color of Kingman turquoise has become a standard in the industry and has made it some of the most valuable turquoise in the world.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#416 Post by nrobertb » Wed Jun 06, 2018 9:37 pm

Here's practically every blade shape possible, This whole group was on sale for just over $600.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#417 Post by nrobertb » Thu Jun 07, 2018 10:26 am

Lone Mountain turquoise ranges from clear blue to dark blue spider web. The most sought after Lone Mountain turquoise is the dark blue with black spider web matrix. Most of the turquoise that comes out of Lone Mountain these days is gray blue or robin’s egg blue. The dark blue with black spider web are very rare.

Lone Mountain is known for its ability to hold its beautiful blue color, even after decades of use, unlike other turquoise, which tend to slowly turn light green. It’s also harder than most turquoise. These characteristics make Lone Mountain ideal for jewelry making.

The Lone Mountain Turquoise Mine is located in Esmeralda County, Nevada. Due to the unsafe history of mining there, Lone Mountain hasn’t been too actively mined in recent years.

For the above reasons, Lone Mountain turquoise is some of the most valued turquoise in the world.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#418 Post by nrobertb » Thu Jun 07, 2018 1:39 pm

It is generally believed the establishment of the art of silversmithing in the Hopi tribe began with a trader named Sikyatala. The Zuni and Hopi Pueblos had long before established a trade route whose trail covered a 100 miles. Lanyade, a Zuni trader and silversmith, was thought to have tought Sikyatala how to make silver in the late 1800’s. Given that the two Pueblos had regular trade relations, the art of smithing would have been shared, especially with Sikyatala who was a member of the Mustard Clan which has Zuni associations.

Sikyatala would go on to teach many Hopi men who then would share their knowledge with others. The style of jewelry created by the Hopi smiths would resemble that being made by the Zuni and Navajo peoples.

The techniques used to create the jewelry were varied but one particular method was developed that is now thought of as typical “Hopi” in style. Some of the designs were created by appliqué which is when a design is cut out and applied to a base of silver. The piece left over could also be used by overlaying it on another base which resulted in Hopi “overlay” jewelry.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#419 Post by nrobertb » Thu Jun 07, 2018 9:07 pm

Number 8 turquoise ranges in color from light blue to blue-green to dark blue. It’s always found with characteristic black, golden or brown spider web matrix, which makes it easy to identify. Number 8 is also known for its unusually large nuggets, the largest of which weighed an astonishing 150 pounds.

The Number 8 Turquoise Mine is located in Lynn mining district in Eureka County, Nevada. The mine has been closed since 1976 due to the discovery of gold there. Fortunately, Dowell Ward, the most recent owner of the mine still has a healthy stockpile of them.

Today Number 8 turquoise is considered to be one of the most valuable types on the market.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#420 Post by nrobertb » Thu Jun 07, 2018 9:51 pm

Mason does a lot of variations on the railroad spike knife.
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