Well, the board is either fixed, or it's going to run terribly. Cross your fingers and hope for the best. I'm at my technical limit right now.

Spurs and the Great West

Message
Author
User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 706
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#391 Post by nrobertb » Wed May 30, 2018 9:18 am

These antler handled items are by Manion.
Attachments
manion.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 706
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#392 Post by nrobertb » Wed May 30, 2018 6:30 pm

Today when we look at old wagons, farm equipment and tools, they look dull and drab because they have been sitting outdoors or in a barn for years. In fact, in the old days products were brightly colored to attract buyers and be a source of pride for the owners. Wagons, for example were red, green, orange, or blue. In the photo below you can see the remnants of the original paint job.
Attachments
wagon.png

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 706
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#393 Post by nrobertb » Thu May 31, 2018 10:13 am

When the first farmers homesteaded the prairies they found incredibly thick and tough sod that had been accumulating for thousands of years. Regular plows wouldn't work so inventors came up with sodbuster plows. There were various designs, one of which is shown below.
Attachments
sodbuster.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 706
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#394 Post by nrobertb » Thu May 31, 2018 5:23 pm

Yet another railroad spike knife.
Attachments
rr.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 706
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#395 Post by nrobertb » Thu May 31, 2018 11:04 pm

A pair of spurs by McCown.
Attachments
McCow1.jpg
McCow1.jpg (33.71 KiB) Viewed 498 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 706
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#396 Post by nrobertb » Fri Jun 01, 2018 10:38 am

Homestead National Monument of America, a unit of the National Park System, commemorates passage of the Homestead Act of 1862, which allowed any qualified person to claim up to 160 acres of federally owned land in exchange for five years of residence and the cultivation and improvement of the property. The Act eventually transferred 270,000,000 acres from public to private ownership.

The national monument is five miles west of Beatrice, Gage County, Nebraska on a site that includes some of the first acres successfully claimed under the Homestead Act.

The park includes 100 acres of tallgrass prairie restored to approximate the ecosystem that once covered the central plains of the United States—and that was nearly plowed into extinction by the homesteaders. This restoration, which necessitates regular mowing, haying, and prescribed burns, has been managed by the National Park Service for more than 60 years and is the oldest in the National Park System. The park maintains about 2.7 miles of hiking trails through the prairie and the woodland surrounding Cub Creek.

Daniel Freeman (1826–1908), a native of Ohio, filed the first homestead claim in the Brownville, Nebraska land office on January 1, 1863. By the mid-1880s, Freeman also claimed to have been the first homesteader in the nation. Freeman eventually amassed more than 1,000 acres and became a prominent citizen of Gage County. As early as 1884, he first proposed the idea of memorializing himself as the earliest homesteader, and shortly after his death in 1908, Beatrice residents talked of preserving his homestead as a national park.

In 1934, Beatrice citizens organized the National Homestead Park Association. In 1935, Congressman Henry C. Luckey of Lincoln introduced legislation to create the park, which eventually became law in March 1936. But federal funding for the purchase was not obtained until March 1938. Negotiations with the Freeman heirs "dragged on for months over the value of the land," and condemnation proceedings were instigated to bring them to terms. The government took possession at the end of the year.
Attachments
Homestead.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 706
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#397 Post by nrobertb » Fri Jun 01, 2018 1:59 pm

A bit of trivia: if a residence is made of round logs, it is a log cabin. If it is made of square logs, it is a log house.
Attachments
log house.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 706
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#398 Post by nrobertb » Fri Jun 01, 2018 10:25 pm

The sod house or "soddy" was a successor to the log cabin during frontier settlement of Canada and the United States. The prairie lacked standard building materials such as wood or stone; however, sod from thickly-rooted prairie grass was abundant. Prairie grass had a much thicker, tougher root structure than modern landscaping grass.

Construction of a sod house involved cutting patches of sod in rectangles, often 2'×1'×6" and piling them into walls. Builders employed a variety of roofing methods. Sod houses accommodate normal doors and windows. The resulting structure was a well-insulated but damp dwelling that was very inexpensive. Sod houses required frequent maintenance and were vulnerable to rain damage. Stucco or wood panels often protected the outer walls. Canvas or plaster often lined the interior walls.
Attachments
sod1.jpeg
sod1.jpeg (16.91 KiB) Viewed 479 times
sod2.jpg
sod2.jpg (17.6 KiB) Viewed 479 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 706
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#399 Post by nrobertb » Sat Jun 02, 2018 10:40 am

A pair of Mexican spurs.
Attachments
mex8.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 706
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#400 Post by nrobertb » Sat Jun 02, 2018 8:13 pm

Navajo Silversmithing began about one hundred fifty years ago when a Navajo Blacksmith named Atsidi Sani was shown how to work with Silver by the Spaniards. The Spaniards were coming up to the Southwestern United States seeking Gold and Silver and the Native American Indians admired the shiny silver ornamentation on the horse gear that the Spaniards had.

Atsidi taught the art of silversmithing to other Navajo Indians and it spread throughout the Navajo Nation quickly. The Navajo Silversmiths would melt down silver coins they got from the U.S. Calvary, trading Posts and Indian traders.

It was around 1865 when Atsidi Sani began producing Silver buttons which were called conchos and they began embellishing their clothing and Jewelry.

About 1880 the Navajo Silversmiths began incorporating Turquoise which created a giant demand for their Jewelry.

The Traders to the Navajo also appreciated Turquoise Jewelry and brought it to the marketplace in California where it was quickly accepted and appreciated by city people.

The photo is of a Navajo smith called Slender, taken in 1886.
Attachments
slender.jpg
slender.jpg (22.91 KiB) Viewed 444 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 706
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#401 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jun 03, 2018 10:33 am

Probably the most popular Navajo piece is the squash blossom necklace, sometime plain silver, sometimes loaded with turquoise or other stones.
Attachments
squash.jpg
squash.jpg (16.07 KiB) Viewed 427 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 706
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#402 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jun 03, 2018 3:09 pm

Another Navajo silver favorite is the concho belt. In the 1800's the conchos were often hammered out of Mexican silver pesos.
Attachments
concho.jpg
concho.jpg (32 KiB) Viewed 423 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 706
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#403 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jun 03, 2018 7:29 pm

Old time cowboys couldn't afford factory made cigarettes, so they carried a bag of tobacco and papers and rolled their own. It was a real art to do this without spilling the tobacco. Some guys could even do it one handed. Here is a photo of old Frank rolling a cigarette one handed.
Attachments
old frank.jpg

ffuries
Member
Member
Posts: 391
Joined: Fri Jun 02, 2017 8:51 pm
Age: 50
Location: Panama City, Florida
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#404 Post by ffuries » Sun Jun 03, 2018 8:19 pm

nrobertb wrote:
Sun Jun 03, 2018 7:29 pm
Old time cowboys couldn't afford factory made cigarettes, so they carried a bag of tobacco and papers and rolled their own. It was a real art to do this without spilling the tobacco. Some guys could even do it one handed. Here is a photo of old Frank rolling a cigarette one handed.
Looking at this picture reminds me that what we call a "Cowboy Hat" is not what they looked like back then. Don't know when the modern incarnation came about though. A lot of what the uneducated masses (This included me for many years also) know about that era is based on Hollywood creativity. Like the holster slung low on the leg, etc. I'm sure you know this more than most due to your interest in that time period.
Mike
TSgt, USAF Retired
Jan 86 - Sept 08
Aircrew Life Support
"Your Life Is Our Business"
(122X0, 1T1X1, 1P0X1)
NRA Life Member

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 706
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#405 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jun 03, 2018 10:19 pm

This is what an old time holster looked like. This photo brings up the subject of cuff protectors, which seem to have been pretty common. I guess they were an item of adornment as much as an item of protection.
Attachments
holster.jpg

Post Reply

Return to “General Off Topic”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests