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Spurs and the Great West

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nrobertb
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#376 Post by nrobertb » Fri May 25, 2018 10:00 am

This is a shank snaffle bit from Colorado Saddlery in Denver.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#377 Post by nrobertb » Fri May 25, 2018 2:25 pm

This is an oldy but a goody. There''s nothing special about this knife, just good American steel from Imperial in Rhode Island. I got this knife in 1955 by sending in 200 wrappers from Fudgesicle wrappers. No, I didn't eat them. Over several weeks I picked the wrappers up on the lawn of the neighborhood cafeteria. When you are young and want something but don't have any money, you have to be creative.

I've used it for jobs as diverse as field dressing deer and probing the ground to locate the lids of my septic tanks.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#378 Post by nrobertb » Fri May 25, 2018 6:02 pm

I mentioned that I had shot deer for the Carlsbad research project. An amusing thing happened on one of the hunts.
Three of us had ridden horses into the rugged back country. I stood at the top of a draw while one of the others circled around to the lower end of the draw to see if he could drive anything past me.
After several minutes he came into view and I concluded there were no deer to be had. I needed to “drain my radiator”, so I leaned my rifle against a tree, unzipped, and took things in hand.
At that precise moment a big mule deer buck came bounding out of nowhere and stopped broadside to me about fifty feet away. I dropped my “gun”, picked up my rifle and shot him.
My partner had witnessed the whole thing and was laughing hysterically. I managed an embarrassed smile. You can imagine the kidding I took from the park crew after that event.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#379 Post by nrobertb » Sat May 26, 2018 6:10 pm

Imperial Schrade Corp. was an American knife manufacturer of hunting knives and pocketknives. Imperial Schrade was the consolidation of five forerunner companies, including its namesakes, the Imperial Knife Company, founded 1916, and the Schrade Cutlery Company, founded in 1904. In 2004, the company stopped making knives and closed its factory. The name was bought by Taylor Brands and used for marketing purposes.

The Imperial Knife Company had its roots at the Empire Knife Company in Winsted, Connecticut. In 1916, two men named Felix and Michael Mirando moved to Providence, Rhode Island to be near its jewelry industry and began making skeletons for “waldemar,” or pocket watch chain knives. With their friend Domenic Fazzano as manager, they established the Imperial Knife Company, which would grow to at one point be the largest knife manufacturer in the United States. The company developed a number of successful innovations in the manufacture of commercial value-priced folding pocket knives.

In 1941, Albert M. Baer purchased the Ulster Knife Company (which was founded in Ellenville, New York, in the 1870s) and merged it with the Imperial Knife Company and designated this new business as the Imperial Knife Associated Companies, to produce knives for the military. Albert's brother, Henry Baer, was the company's first president and the namesake for Schrade's "Uncle Henry" line of knives.

Tang stamps bearing the Imperial name appeared until 1988, when they were discontinued and replaced by the Schrade name.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#380 Post by nrobertb » Sat May 26, 2018 11:11 pm

A Brumby is a free-roaming feral horse in Australia. Although found in many areas around the country, the best-known Brumbies are found in the Australian Alps region. Today, most of them are found in the Northern Territory, with the second largest population in Queensland. A group of Brumbies is known as a "mob" or "band".

Brumbies are the descendants of escaped or lost horses, dating back in some cases to those belonging to the early European settlers, including the "Capers" from South Africa, Timor Ponies from Indonesia, British pony and draught horse breeds, and a significant number of Thoroughbreds and Arabians.

Today they live in many places, including some National Parks. Occasionally they are mustered and domesticated for use as campdrafters, working stock horses on farms or stations, but also as trail horses, show horses, Pony Club mounts and pleasure horses. They are the subject of some controversy – regarded as a pest and threat to native ecosystems by environmentalists and the government, but also valued by others as part of Australia's heritage, with supporters working to prevent inhumane treatment or extermination, and rehoming Brumbies who have been captured.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#381 Post by nrobertb » Sun May 27, 2018 11:30 am

Here's another version of the ever popular railroad spike knife, this time by James Wahls.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#382 Post by nrobertb » Sun May 27, 2018 10:44 pm

The Camillus Cutlery Company was one of the oldest knife manufacturers in the United States as its roots date back to 1876. The Company produced millions of knives until it filed for bankruptcy in 2007 due to fierce overseas competition and bad business skills. Its brand name and intellectual property rights were purchased by Acme United Corporation, which re-launched the Camillus brand in May 2009 using modern materials.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#383 Post by nrobertb » Mon May 28, 2018 12:01 am

Here's an oddity of western movies and TV shows. How many times in interior shots is someone lighting a kerosene lantern or there is one already burning. Did you ever notice how often the glass chimney is coated on the inside with black soot? This is because they didn't understand how it works and turned the flame too high. Anyone who has ever used one knows that to get maximum light your chimney has to be clean.

There are three types: dead-flame, hot-blast, and cold-blast. Both hot-blast and cold-blast designs are called tubular lanterns and are safer than dead-flame lamps, as tipping over a tubular lantern cuts off the oxygen flow to the burner and will extinguish the flame within seconds.

The earliest portable kerosene "glass globe" lanterns, of the 1850s and 1860s, were of the dead-flame type, meaning that it had an open wick, but the airflow to the flame was strictly controlled in an upward motion by a combination of vents at the bottom of the burner and an open topped chimney. This had the effect of removing side-to-side drafts and thus significantly reducing or even eliminating the flickering that can occur with an exposed flame.

Later lanterns, such as the hot-blast and cold-blast lanterns, took this airflow control even further by partially enclosing the wick in a "deflector" or "burner cone" and channeling the airflow through that restricted area, creating a brighter and even more stable flame.

The hot-blast design, also known as a "tubular lantern" due to the metal tubes used in its construction, was invented by John Irwin and patented on January 12, 1868. The hot-blast design collected hot air from above the globe and fed it through metal side tubes to the burner, to make the flame burn brighter.

The cold-blast design is similar to the hot-blast, except that cold fresh air is drawn in from around the top of the globe and is then fed though the metal side tubes to the flame, making it burn brighter. This design produces a brighter light than the hot-blast design, because the fresh air that is fed to the flame has plenty of oxygen to support the combustion process.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#384 Post by nrobertb » Mon May 28, 2018 9:53 am

The Diamond Match Company has its roots in several nineteenth century companies. In the early 1850s, Edward Tatnall of Wilmington, Delaware was given an English recipe for making matches by a business acquaintance, William R. Smith. In 1853, Tatnall attempted to turn the recipe into a business at Market Street Bridge over Brandywine Creek in Wilmington. The first matches ignited with the slightest friction, a problem Tatnall solved by reducing the phosporous content by 25 per cent.

In the next few years, Tatnall was joined by a young Englishman, Henry Coughtrey, who was an experienced match maker, and who changed his name to Courtney. During a business depression in 1857, Tatnall closed his plant, but Courtney continued to experiment with improvements to the safety and quality of his own matches. In 1860, William H. Swift joined Tatnall’s firm to provide clerical and financial services. Though Swift saw potential in Courtney’s innovations, Tatnall felt he had spent enough on the match business and turned the business over to Courtney and Swift for nothing. In 1861, the two of them created the Swift & Courtney Company. Their new matches were called Diamond State Parlor Matches.

Demand during the Civil War created a large and growing market for Swift & Courtney matches. In order to meet an expanding need for production even after the Civil War, the company merged with Beecher & Sons of New Haven, Connecticut in 1870 to create the Swift & Courtney & Beecher Company. Incorporated in Connecticut, manufacturing remained in Wilmington, Delaware. Later in 1870, the company purchased the match business of Thomas Allen & Company of St. Louis, Missouri. In 1872 they bought McGiugan & Daily of Philadelphia, and made contracts with Joseph Loehy of New York City and Charles Busch of Trenton, New Jersey.

In 1880, everything was sold to the Barber Match Company, founded by O.C. Barber, creating the Diamond Match Company. William H. Swift and his brother, Joseph Swift were on the Board of Directors of Diamond in 1881. The company was the largest manufacturer of matches in the United States in the late nineteenth century. Purchased by Jarden in 2003, it has been owned by Newell Brands since Newell Rubbermaid's acquisition of the company in a merger in 2016.

The Diamond Match Company operated plants at Barberton, Ohio; Wilmington, Delaware, Barber, California (later Chico); and Cloquet, Minnesota. In the twenty-first century, Diamond remains America's leading producer of matches, producing some twelve billion a year. It also produces plastic cutlery and other wood products.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#385 Post by nrobertb » Mon May 28, 2018 10:44 am

In honor of Memorial Day I thought I'd post a photo of this WWII M5 Stuart tank that has been in my hometown since 1949. Cute little thing, probably like its namesake (Donna, not Stuart).
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#386 Post by nrobertb » Mon May 28, 2018 1:59 pm

Stuarts were the first American-crewed tanks in World War II to engage the enemy in tank versus tank combat.

Observing events in Europe, American tank designers realized that the Light Tank M2 was becoming obsolete and set about improving it. The upgraded design, with thicker armor, modified suspension and new gun recoil system was called "Light Tank M3". Production of the vehicle started in March 1941 and continued until October 1943. Like its direct predecessor, the M2A4, the M3 was initially armed with a 37mm M5 gun and five .30-06 Browning M1919A4 machine guns: coaxial with the gun, on top of the turret in an M20 anti-aircraft mount, in a ball mount in right bow, and in the right and left hull sponsons. Later, the gun was replaced with the slightly longer M6, and the sponson machine guns were removed. For a light tank, the Stuart was fairly heavily armored. It had 38 mm of armor on the upper front hull, 44 mm on the lower front hull, 51 mm on the gun mantlet, 38 mm on the turret sides, 25 mm on the hull sides, and 25 mm on the hull rear.

Internally, the radial engine was at the rear and the transmission at the front. The prop shaft connecting the two ran through the middle of the fighting compartment. The radial engine, having its crankshaft high off the hull bottom, contributed to the tank's high silhouette. When a revolving turret floor was introduced in the M3 hybrid and M3A1, the crew had less room. In contrast to the M2A4, all M3/M5 series tanks had a trailing rear idler wheel for increased ground contact.

To relieve the demand for the radial aero-engines used in the M3, a new version was developed using twin Cadillac V-8 automobile engines and twin Hydra-Matic transmissions operating through a transfer case. This variation was quieter, cooler and roomier. Owing to its automatic transmission, it also simplified crew training. The new model (initially called M4 but redesignated M5 to avoid confusion with the M4 Sherman[8]) also featured a redesigned hull with sloped glacis plate and driver's hatches moved to the top. Although the main criticism from the units using it was that the Stuarts lacked firepower, the improved M5 series kept the same 37 mm gun. The M5 gradually replaced the M3 in production from 1942 and, after the M7 project proved unsatisfactory, was succeeded by the Light Tank M24 in 1944.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#387 Post by nrobertb » Tue May 29, 2018 12:03 am

Manion makes knives too, but I thought these rings made from coins are very interesting.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#388 Post by nrobertb » Tue May 29, 2018 10:06 am

This knife is by Jeff Baker of Show Low, Arizona.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#389 Post by nrobertb » Tue May 29, 2018 8:51 pm

An interesting idea: a knife made from meteorite steel by Bob Kramer.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#390 Post by ffuries » Tue May 29, 2018 11:26 pm

nrobertb wrote:
Sun May 27, 2018 10:44 pm
The Camillus Cutlery Company was one of the oldest knife manufacturers in the United States as its roots date back to 1876. The Company produced millions of knives until it filed for bankruptcy in 2007 due to fierce overseas competition and bad business skills. Its brand name and intellectual property rights were purchased by Acme United Corporation, which re-launched the Camillus brand in May 2009 using modern materials.
When I get out of the hospital, I'll have to post a picture of mine. It's a 1960s dated one that I carried during USAF Combat Survival School and through out my career. It's beat up and well used but still serviceable. I use to have 3 ammo cans full of these knives, that I would just give away. Now I only have the one left.
Mike
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