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Spurs and the Great West

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nrobertb
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1531 Post by nrobertb » Sat Mar 28, 2020 10:36 am

Blewett Pass, at an elevation of 4,124 feet is a mountain pass in the Wenatchee Mountains (an eastward extension of the Cascades) of Washington state that is crossed by U.S. Route 97. Named for Edward Blewett, a Seattle mining promoter of the 1880s, it lies on the route of the historical Yellowstone Trail.

Unlike the many well known passes that lie on the spine of the Cascades, Blewett Pass lies on the divide between the Wenatchee River to the north and the Yakima River to the south. The highway over the pass connects Interstate 90 between Seattle and Ellensburg, Washington with US 2 between Monroe and Wenatchee. The route from Seattle to Wenatchee over Snoqualmie Pass and Blewett Pass is a reasonable alternative to the more northerly route over Stevens Pass.

What is now called Blewett Pass was formerly known as Swauk Pass. It should not be confused with Old Blewett Pass, which is about 5 miles west of the current summit at the slightly lower elevation of 4,064 feet. Swauk was renamed to Blewett Pass in the 1960s after the completion of a new highway alignment for US 97, with locals preferring to keep the old name. The old pass road is Forest Road 9715 and Forest Road 7320. The road closes for the winter so that seasonal recreation may take place. One should inquire about conditions with a Wenatchee National Forest office before driving the road upon re-opening in the warmer months.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1532 Post by nrobertb » Sun Mar 29, 2020 12:41 am

Some more spur variations.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1533 Post by nrobertb » Sun Mar 29, 2020 7:51 pm

Forgotten western movies: King of Dodge City (1941)
Wild Bill Hickok is sent to Abilene to take on Morgan King and his gang. When he breaks into King's bank to get proof of King's thievery, Sheriff Tex puts him in jail. His friend Cannonball, having lost Bill's letter of authority, now has to get him out.

Bill Elliott ... Wild Bill Hickok
Tex Ritter ... Tex Rawlings
Judith Linden ... Janice Blair
Dub Taylor ... Cannonball Taylor
Guy Usher ... Morgan King
Rick Anderson ... Judge Lynch
Kenneth Harlan ... Banker Carruthers
Pierce Lyden ... Henchman Reynolds
Francis Walker ... Henchman Carney
Harrison Greene ... Stephen Kimball
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1534 Post by nrobertb » Mon Mar 30, 2020 11:17 am

A horse, a gun and a dog. What more could a man want?
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1535 Post by nrobertb » Tue Mar 31, 2020 10:15 am

I don't know what these guys are doing, but I'm amazed by the stilts. I wonder how many times they fell before they mastered them.



.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1536 Post by nrobertb » Wed Apr 01, 2020 10:02 am

The Chiricahua Mountains massif is a large mountain range in southeastern Arizona which is part of the Basin and Range province of the west and southwest USA and northwest Mexico; the range is part of the Coronado National Forest. The highest point, Chiricahua Peak, rises 9,759 feet above sea level, approximately 6,000 feet above the surrounding valleys.

The Chiricahua Mountains, and other associated ranges, along with Sulphur Springs Valley on the west and the San Simon Valley on the east, form the eastern half of Cochise County in southeast Arizona. The Pedregosa Mountains are found at the southern end of the Chiricahua Mountains, while the Swisshelm Mountains are located to the southwest. The northwest end of the Chiricahua mountains continue as the Dos Cabezas Mountains beyond Apache Pass and the Fort Bowie National Historic Site. Access to the Chiricahua Mountains and Coronado National Forest is through Willcox from the north, Douglas from the south, and Rodeo from the east.

The earliest evidence of humans in the vicinity of the Chiricahua Mountains are Clovis archeological sites such as Double Adobe Site in the Whitewater Draw tributary of Rucker Creek north of Douglas. Subsequently, the Cochise culture another pre-ceramic based culture spanning 3000 - 200 BCE was defined from sites around the Chiricahua Mountains, including Cave Creek Canyon. Following the transition to ceramics, artifacts characteristic of both Mogollon culture and its local variants, the Mimbres culture, are found. These relics span the period from 150 BCE - 1450. The influx of other indigenous peoples, such as the Chiricahua Apaches, including the leaders Cochise and Geronimo occupied the area until forced removal in the late 19th century.

The name Chiricahua is believed to originate from the Opata name for the mountains, Chiwi Kawi, meaning "Turkey Mountain". The Chiricahuas were once known for an abundance of wild turkeys.

The first recorded mining claim in the Chiricahua Mountains was the Hidden Treasure claim filed in 1881, and mining has continued intermittently to the present with the greatest periods of activity occurring in the 1920s and 1950s.

More recently, the Chiricahuas have fallen into use by people smugglers and drug cartels, who position lookouts on their peaks to warn of Border Patrol activities.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1537 Post by nrobertb » Thu Apr 02, 2020 11:10 am

The Big Sioux River is a tributary of the Missouri River, 419 miles long, in eastern South Dakota and northwestern Iowa. The United States Board on Geographic Names settled on "Big Sioux River" as the stream's name in 1931. The river was named after the Lakota people (Sioux Indians).

The Big Sioux River rises in Roberts County, South Dakota[3] on a low plateau known as the Coteau des Prairies and flows generally southwardly through Grant, Codington, Hamlin, Brookings, Moody, and Minnehaha counties, past the communities of Watertown, Castlewood, Bruce, Flandreau, Egan, Trent, Dell Rapids, and Baltic to Sioux Falls, where it passes over a waterfall in Falls Park, which gives that city its name. Downstream of Sioux Falls and the community of Brandon, the Big Sioux is used to define the boundary between South Dakota and Iowa, flowing along the eastern borders of Lincoln and Union counties in South Dakota, and the western borders of Lyon, Sioux and Plymouth counties in Iowa, past the communities of Canton, Fairview, Hudson, Hawarden, North Sioux City, and Dakota Dunes in South Dakota and Beloit, Hawarden and Akron in Iowa. It joins the Missouri River from the north at Sioux City, Iowa.

The Bix Sioux River, at the USGS station in Sioux City, Iowa, has a mean annual discharge of approximately 3,793 cubic feet per second.

The Big Sioux River collects the Rock River from the northeast in Sioux County, Iowa. A minor headwaters tributary of the Big Sioux in Grant County, South Dakota, is known as the Indian River. Broken Kettle Creek has its confluence with the Big Sioux in Plymouth County, Iowa.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1538 Post by nrobertb » Thu Apr 02, 2020 11:49 pm

Great western character actor: Andrew Duggan
Born in Franklin, Indiana on December 28, 1923, he was raised in Texas and went to college at Indiana University. There, on a speech and drama scholarship, he began to act and perform however this was interrupted by being called into the service. In World War II where he saw action overseas, he was befriended by actor Melvyn Douglas who led his division. With such encouragement, as well as meeting and becoming familiar with some Broadway folks, Duggan went into acting. From 1953 through practically the time of his death in 1988, he was a fixture in both movies and television. It is impossible to list all the different shows this prolific actor was part of either as support, guest or star. But to give an idea, he was General Ed Britt on 12 O'Clock High (1964), he was Cal Calhoun in Bourbon Street Beat (1959) and his most famous role as Murdoch Lancer in Lancer (1968) and the original John Walton opposite Patricia Neal in The Homecoming: A Christmas Story (1971). Many people will remember him as "Howitzer" Al Houlihan, the father of Hotlips in M*A*S*H (1972). It was in 1954 that he married the Broadway actress Elizabeth Logue whom he always called "Betty". Both Andrew Duggan and his wife were cremated, their ashes scattered at Lake Arrowhead, California.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1539 Post by nrobertb » Fri Apr 03, 2020 3:32 pm

Another interesting old time picture. I'd guess those are wolf skins. Anyone recognize the rifle? Judging from the cartridges in his belt I'd guess it is something like .45-90 caliber.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1540 Post by nrobertb » Fri Apr 03, 2020 3:38 pm

Oh my gosh, will they never end? Yet another railroad spike knife.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1541 Post by nrobertb » Sat Apr 04, 2020 11:07 am

A silver and turquoise pendant by Ron Bedonie.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1542 Post by nrobertb » Sat Apr 04, 2020 11:56 pm

Forgotten western movies: The Phantom Empire
Gene (Gene Autry) is a singing cowboy happily running a radio station that happens to be located just above a mystical subterranean city. Conniving scientists discover the city and its rich deposits of radium ore and make plans to invade the underground world -- but first they must knock Gene out of the picture. The cowboy is not easily discouraged, however, and he enters the depths with his young sidekicks Frankie (Frankie Darro) and Betsy (Betsy King Ross) in order to set things right.


Gene Autry ... Gene Autry
Frankie Darro ... Frankie Baxter
Betsy King Ross ... Betsy Baxter
Dorothy Christy ... Queen Tika
Wheeler Oakman ... Lord Argo
Charles K. French ... Mal
Warner Richmond ... RabJ. Frank Glendon ... Professor Beetson (as Frank Glendon)
Smiley Burnette ... Oscar (as Lester 'Smiley' Burnett)
Peter Potter ... Pete (as William Moore)
Edward Peil Sr. ... Doctor Cooper (as Edward Piel Sr.)
Jack Carlyle ... Saunders
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1543 Post by nrobertb » Sun Apr 05, 2020 6:58 pm

Turquoise and coral by Kee Yazzie,
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1544 Post by nrobertb » Mon Apr 06, 2020 3:25 pm

Great western character actors: Jeremy Slate
Born by the Atlantic Ocean, Jeremy Slate also had a Pacific Ocean view when he lived in Malibu, California. In between oceans he has traveled the world.

He attended a military academy, joined the US Navy at 16 and was barely 18 when his destroyer joined the invasion of Normandy on D-Day (June 6, 1944). Aboard that destroyer at Omaha Beach that day, he vowed if he survived the attack he would make his life a never-ending series of adventures. He has lived up to that promise with adventures as a lifeguard, a swimming instructor, the first person to swim across the Long Island Sound after the war, college graduate with honors in English, writer, songwriter, screenwriter, a radio announcer, actor and director.

Known as one of the more talented members of Hollywood's beach boy set of the 1960s, Slate sent feminine hearts aflutter as the star of the 1960 TV series The Aquanauts (1960). His career included numerous guest-starring roles in popular television programs of the 1950s and 1960s. He guest-starred in nearly 100 television shows as well as appearing in 20 feature films.

While about half of his portrayals have been heavies, Jeremy is equally adept at comedy and has worked with some of Hollywood's best. He was punched out by Elvis Presley in Girls! Girls! Girls! (1962), Frankie Avalon broke a guitar over his head in I'll Take Sweden (1965), he was knocked silly by Van Johnson in Wives and Lovers (1963), was shot by John Wayne in True Grit (1969), died spectacularly while trying to save the Duke's life in The Sons of Katie Elder (1965), was shot between the eyes by Billy Jack (Tom Laughlin in The Born Losers (1967) and went up in flames in The Lawnmower Man (1992). Jeremy wrote the screen story for Hell's Angels '69 (1969). During the filming of this biker film (which he described as a "western on wheels") he broke his leg, and never rode a motorcycle again.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1545 Post by nrobertb » Tue Apr 07, 2020 1:29 pm

Born in 1822, Henry Weber set out for America when he was eighteen. He apprenticed as a wagon maker for three years in New York before heading west to Detroit, Michigan. The future ‘Motor City’ capital couldn’t hold him, though, and he soon set his eyes on Chicago. Arriving there midway through 1844, he immediately found work in an established wagon shop. By the following year, Weber was working on plans for his own vehicle business. With a $250 investment, he and partner, Jacob Gauch, hung out their shingle as wagon makers in 1845.

In less than a decade, Weber had outgrown his humble beginnings and began to expand his operations. By the spring of 1871, the company was expanding again. This time to a large 4-story brick building. It was one of the few structures to survive the Great Chicago Fire in October of the same year. Escaping one inferno, though, was no guarantee of future getaways. Luck ran out for Weber in August of 1887 when a fire ravaged everything but his stock of lumber.

After thirty-eight years in business, the company finally incorporated in 1883. With $150,000 of fresh capital to work with, they had traveled far from the first day with just $250 and a dream.

By the mid-1890’s, the Weber Wagon Company is reported to have been producing 16,000 wagons and bobsleds annually. With a strong distribution system, they were recognized throughout the U.S. as a quality and highly desirable brand. Such was the growth that it attracted considerable attention from buyers who wanted to purchase the entire company. In a move to compete more effectively in the lucrative wagon market, International Harvester Corporation purchased Weber in 1904.
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