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Spurs and the Great West

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nrobertb
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1156 Post by nrobertb » Thu May 23, 2019 10:14 am

More spurs.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1157 Post by nrobertb » Fri May 24, 2019 11:11 am

Boiling Springs State Park is a park built 6 miles northeast of Woodward, Oklahoma, USA. It was built by the Civilian Conservation Corps in the 1930s.
The park received its current name because its sandy-bottom springs appear to be boiling because of the inrush of subsurface water. The water temperature is actually far cooler than boiling.

Native Americans, Spanish explorers, and pioneers have visited and inhabited the land used for the park. Spanish expeditions from Mexico are believed to have visited the area as early as 1541 as part of Francisco Vázquez de Coronado’s search for the fabled "Seven Cities of Gold". In 1641, another Spanish explorer – Juan de Oñate - reported that several Indian encampments were found near the cool springs and heavy timber of the area. In 1823, U.S. Cavalry General Thomas James established a fur trading post here. Captain Nathan Boone, son of Daniel Boone, explored the vicinity of the park in 1843 on an expedition originating from Fort Gibson in eastern Oklahoma. Pioneers flocking into this area during the land run of 1893 found the location quite suitable for farming and hunting. In the early 1900s, area residents were just beginning to find and enjoy the recreation potential of this site.

In 1935, much of the land comprising the present day park was acquired by the City of Woodward to provide a place for recreation for its citizens and visitors. Although the local "swimming hole" was already present, the primary development work was accomplished by the young men of Company 2822 of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) from 1935 to 1939. A monument stands in the main picnic area of the park in honor of the contributions made by these men in making the park a place for so many to enjoy.

The park covers 820 acres and includes a small lake. It is located in a portion of Oklahoma known for a semi-arid climate and sparse vegetation. The park itself includes a forest of hackberry, walnut, chinaberry, oak and elms and attracts whitetail deer, wild turkey, raccoon, coyote, bobcat, beaver, badger, skunk and opossum.

The park offers cabins, RV sites and tent campsites. It has an 18-hole golf course and hiking trails. The park provides a variety of services and facilities for the enjoyment of more than 200,000 visitors each year. Two camping areas can accommodate everything from pup tents to modern recreational vehicles. Cabins are situated beside the park’s 5-acre lake. Group camps, community building, and numerous picnic facilities are available here along with a host of other activities including hiking, camping, swimming, fishing, exercise walking and wildlife observation.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1158 Post by nrobertb » Sat May 25, 2019 12:35 am

Daisy Taugelchee, World's most famous Navajo Rug Weaver
Daisy Tougelchee was born around 1909 or 1911 and is considered the greatest 20th century Navajo weaver, winning the Gallup Ceremonial for 25 years.

A typical Navajo rug has approximately 30 wefts to the linear inch. A Two Grey Hills from Toadlena average about 45. The finer pieces frequently have upwards of 80.

When a textile has 80 or more wefts per inch, it is considered a tapestry, not a rug.The most famous weaver of these textiles was Daisy Taugelchee (1909-1990), who wove upwards of 115 wefts per inch, which created the most finely woven Navajo tapestries anywhere.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1159 Post by nrobertb » Sat May 25, 2019 6:16 pm

Great western character actors: The son of a whiskey peddler, Walter Woolf King began singing for his supper at quite a young age, in churches especially. Following graduation, he pursued his dream and partnered in a vaudeville musical act with pianist Charles Le Maire. He made his Broadway debut in 1919 and developed a resilient name for himself during the 1920s as a baritone in various operettas and musical comedies. Billed as Walter Woolf and Walter King in his early career, he finally settled on all three names by the mid-1930s. He eventually was drawn to early talking films and began promisingly enough as a dapper lead in plush musicals, but was quickly relegated to swank villainy in Marx Brothers and Laurel and Hardy slapstick. He also found steady offers on radio but, tired of his stalled career, became an actor's agent. Walter would return from time to time in gruff bit roles as a (now) bulkier, grey-haired corporate or aristocrat, particularly on TV.

Retired from full-time acting to become an agent but left the profession after ten years when he developed an ulcer.
Once sued Warner Brothers for breach of contract after dismissing King following his very first picture which failed at the box office. The Studio claimed his singing voice was unsuitable for sound. An out-of-court settlement was reached in his favor.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1160 Post by nrobertb » Sun May 26, 2019 8:33 pm

Pikes Peak State Park is a state park of Iowa, US, featuring a 500-foot bluff overlooking the Upper Mississippi River opposite the confluence of the Wisconsin River. The park is operated by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. It is nearly a thousand acres in extent. The nearest city is McGregor, Iowa. Iowa Highway 76 approximately defines its northern boundary.

It gets its name from the Iowa incarnation of Pikes Peak, a particularly high point overlooking the gorge of the Upper Mississippi, and like Pikes Peak in Colorado, is named for Zebulon Pike.

There are hiking trails, campgrounds and RV facilities. Mountain bikes are permitted in certain portions of the park. Aside from recreational development, the land in the park was never cleared and to a large extent remains as it was before the advent of white settlement.

It is part of a larger complex of parks, reserves and refuges which include Effigy Mounds National Monument, the various components of the Yellow River State Forest, the enormous Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge and much smaller, much less well known Driftless Area National Wildlife Refuge. The Northeast Iowa Legacy Trail System is undergoing development, and will connect elements of these sites.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1161 Post by nrobertb » Mon May 27, 2019 2:02 pm

A pair of spurs by Hanley.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1162 Post by nrobertb » Tue May 28, 2019 10:23 am

Backbone State Park is Iowa's oldest state park, dedicated in 1919. Located in the valley of the Maquoketa River, it is approximately three miles south of Strawberry Point in Delaware County. It is named for a narrow and steep ridge of bedrock carved by a loop of the Maquoketa River originally known as the Devil's Backbone. The initial 1,200 acres were donated by E.M. Carr of Lamont, Iowa. Backbone Lake Dam, a relatively low dam built by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) in the 1930s, created Backbone Lake. The CCC constructed a majority of trails and buildings which make up the park.

The area of the Devil's Backbone was a favorite of natural scientists such as W.J. McGee, Thomas Macbride, and Samuel Calvin who visited it to study its ancient geologic formations. Edward M. Carr bought 1,200 acres in the 1890s to protect the Backbone Ridge from destruction. MacBride and members of the Iowa Park and Forestry Association thought of it as a prime location for a state park. The State Board of Conservation, organized in December 1918, recommended buying the land at its first meeting. It took a little over a year for the purchase to be finalized. On May 28, 1920 Backbone was dedicated an Iowa's first state park.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1163 Post by nrobertb » Wed May 29, 2019 9:29 am

Some Buermann spurs:
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1164 Post by nrobertb » Wed May 29, 2019 6:21 pm

Burning Coal Vein is a badlands landscape still in the making. Located 15 miles west and north of Amidon, ND the fire smoldering in the coal layer several feet underground was burning when viewed by the first white settlers in the area over a hundred years ago. Burning Coal Vein has since become part of the Little Missouri National Grasslands natural area with adjoining campground.

The underground fire is no longer active, but local landscape features and columnar Rocky Mountain juniper (cedar) bear witness to the effects of the continuous smoke of past years. West and north of Amidon. A great day trip from Dickinson, ND!
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1165 Post by nrobertb » Thu May 30, 2019 12:38 pm

Great western character actors: Colorful character actor of American Westerns. Named "Chill" as an ironic comment on his birth date being the hottest day of 1902. A musician from his youth, he performed from the age of 12 with tent shows, in vaudeville, and with stock companies. While performing in vaudeville in Kansas City, he married ballet dancer Betty Chappelle, with whom he had two children. He formed a musical group, Chill Wills and His Avalon Boys. During an appearance at the Trocadero in Hollywood, they were spotted by an RKO executive, subsequently appearing as a group in several low-budget Westerns. After a prominent appearance with The Avalon Boys as both himself and the bass-singing voice of Stan Laurel in Way Out West (1937), Wills disbanded the group and began a solo career as a usually jovial (but occasionally sinister) character actor, primarily in Westerns. His delightful portrayal of Beekeeper in The Alamo (1960) won him an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor, but his blatant and embarrassing campaign for the Oscar cost him the award and subjected him to a great deal of humiliation -- and probably cost the film a number of awards as well. He continued to work in films and television, usually in roguishly lovable good-ol'-boy parts, up until his death in 1978.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1166 Post by nrobertb » Fri May 31, 2019 12:09 pm

Clayton Lake State Park is a 510-acre Oklahoma state park located in Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, 5 miles south of Clayton, Oklahoma. It has RV sites and tent camping areas, along with primitive cabins, one family-style two bedroom cabin, picnic tables, group picnic shelters, comfort stations with showers, and boat ramps. The park also has an ADA accessible fishing dock, playground, hiking trails, and swimming beach.

After I posted this, I discovered that there is a state park by the same name in New Mexico, and this photo is probably from there.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1167 Post by nrobertb » Sat Jun 01, 2019 1:09 pm

John “Jack” McCall; (1852/1853 – March 1, 1877), also known as "Crooked Nose" or "Broken Nose Jack", was the murderer of Old West legend Wild Bill Hickok. McCall shot Hickok from behind as he played poker at Nuttal & Mann's Saloon in Deadwood, Dakota Territory on August 2, 1876. McCall was executed for the murder on March 1, 1877.

Many details of McCall's life are unknown. He was born in the early 1850s in Jefferson County, Kentucky. McCall was raised in Kentucky with three sisters, and eventually drifted west to become a buffalo hunter. By 1876, he was living in a gold mining camp outside Deadwood, under the alias of "Bill Sutherland."

McCall was drunk at the bar at Nuttal & Mann's saloon in Deadwood on August 1, 1876, when one of the players dropped out of a card game that included "Wild Bill" Hickok. The inebriated McCall quickly took his place. McCall proceeded to lose several hands, and was soon broke. Hickok offered McCall money to buy breakfast and advised him not to play again until he could cover his losses. Though McCall accepted the money, he reportedly felt insulted.

On August 2, a poker game was once again under way at the saloon, but this time Hickok had his back to the door, in contrast to his normal practice of sitting in a corner to protect his back. A resentful and drunken McCall shot Hickok in the back of the head with a single-action .45-caliber revolver, shouting "Damn you! Take that!" Hickok died instantly. McCall ran from the saloon and attempted to steal a horse to escape, but fell from the excited animal. McCall was soon found hiding in the back of a local butcher shop and apprehended.

An impromptu court was called to order with the prosecution, defense, and jury made up of local miners and businessmen. On trial the next day in McDaniel's Theater, McCall claimed his actions were in retribution for Hickok having previously killed his brother in Abilene, Kansas] McCall was found not guilty after two hours. The verdict brought the Black Hills Pioneer to editorialize: "Should it ever be our misfortune to kill a man... we would simply ask that our trial may take place in some of the mining camps of these hills."

Fearing for his safety, McCall soon left the area and headed into Wyoming Territory, where he repeatedly bragged about killing Hickok in a "fair" gunfight. But Wyoming authorities refused to recognize the result of McCall's acquittal on the grounds that the court in Deadwood had no legal jurisdiction. Because Deadwood was not under a legally constituted law enforcement or court system, officials argued that McCall could be tried for murder again. Agreeing, the federal court in Yankton, Dakota Territory, declared that double jeopardy did not apply, and set a date for a retrial.

McCall was tried again in Yankton for Hickok's murder, and was quickly found guilty. After almost three months in jail, he was hanged on March 1, 1877, aged 24.

McCall was buried in Sacred Heart Cemetery in Yankton County, South Dakota, a cemetery which was moved in 1881. When McCall's body was exhumed, it was found to still have the noose around its neck. McCall was the first person to be executed by federal officials in the Dakota Territory.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1168 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jun 02, 2019 1:46 am

Great western character actors: For over five decades veteran character actor Dave Willock could be spotted as your friendly neighbor, buddy or unassuming blue-collar in hundreds of assorted films--both comedy and drama. Tall and lanky marked with a slightly long, gaunt puss, flat vocal pattern and jug-like ears, he was for the most part an amiable guy who blended in unobtrusively as a benign servile -- cabbie, clerk, usher, soda jerk, photographer, messenger boy, bellhop, etc. Decades later he was handed minor but steady work via Jerry Lewis, Robert Aldrich and Walt Disney.

Born in Chicago, Illinois on August 13, 1909 to non-professionals, Dave began his career in theater and drama while a student at the University of Wisconsin. Following college studies, he entered vaudeville as part of the comedy team of "Willock & Carson," an act he put together with future actor Jack Carson. From vaudeville he and Carson transitioned into radio, appearing first on Bing Crosby's "Kraft Music Hall" in 1938. Carson became the bigger star of the two and when he received his own show ("The Jack Carson Show") he utilized his old friend and partner's talents in a second-banana position playing Carson's smart-mouthed nephew Tugwell.

On his own, Dave made his film debut in a student bit in Good Girls Go to Paris (1939) and remained in the overlooked, often unbilled category throughout the war years. His small but amiable bits included various army buddies, benign suitors and dependable sidekicks. Some of his more visible featured roles came in war-era musicals and comedies such as Priorities on Parade (1942), Lucky Jordan (1942), Let's Face It (1943), The Gang's All Here (1943)- Pin Up Girl (1944), She's a Sweetheart (1944) and Joe Palooka, Champ (1946), but nothing he was seen in was big enough to maneuver him into the top character ranks. He was seen to better advantage with the coming of TV, where he dotted a number of comedies, dramas and sitcom series.

A perennial support player, he appeared in a number of cult sci-fi classics of the 1950s including It Came from Outer Space (1953), Revenge of the Creature (1955) and Queen of Outer Space (1958). In later years he served as a minor foil for Jerry Lewis when the comedian went solo in such film vehicles as The Delicate Delinquent (1957), The Geisha Boy (1958), The Ladies Man (1961), The Nutty Professor (1963), The Patsy (1964) and The Disorderly Orderly (1964). Dave was a utility player as well for director Robert Aldrich in such films as Hush...Hush, Sweet Charlotte (1964), The Legend of Lylah Clare (1968), The Grissom Gang (1971), and Emperor of the North (1973), with his most famous Aldrich role being that of Bette Davis and Joan Crawford's vaudeville father in the classic grand guignol shocker What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962). Disney kept him fairly busy in their TV and film features from the late 1950s into the 1970s, and he was a favorite casting choice of Jack Webb for Dragnet and Adam-12 (where he'd appear as a good-natured barfly or a pharmacist). Willock was also heard but not seen in animated cartoons, notably as the narrator of the Wacky Races (1968) kiddie cartoon.

Retired by the late 1970s, Dave passed away on November 12, 1990 of complications from a stroke in Woodland Hills, California at the age of 81.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1169 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jun 02, 2019 11:40 am

Wild Ben Raymond, who worked as a mine guard, posed for his photograph in Leadville, Colorado, holding a First Model open top Merwin Hulbert Frontier Army revolver. Although the arm is believed to have been a photographer’s prop, it nonetheless shows the Merwin’s presence inthe Wild West.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1170 Post by nrobertb » Mon Jun 03, 2019 1:47 pm

This 1879 Leadville, Colorado, image shows two noted Westerners, (at left) Joseph “White Eye” Anderson, who accompanied Wild Bill Hickok to Deadwood in 1876, and his friend E. B. “Yankee” Judd. Judd is packing a First Model Army Merwin Hulbert revolver in his holster and is holding what appears to be a Sharps Borchardt 1878 rifle.
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