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Spurs and the Great West

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nrobertb
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#976 Post by nrobertb » Fri Feb 08, 2019 2:23 pm

Not enough has been said about Curley Bradley, the last Tom Mix of Radio. His public career started as a teenager, doing movie stunts for such notables as Hoot Gibson and Buck Jones, and spanned until he retired in 1950 after playing the radio “Tom Mix” for several years.

Born in Coalgate, Oklahoma on September 18, 1910, George Raymond Courtney was just an Oklahoma farm boy. He worked on his folks’ ranch and did a little ‘cowboy’ work necessary to run a farm. As a teenager we find him working the movie lots of Hollywood, doing stunts for Hoot Gibson, Buck Jones, and Tom Mix. Curley remembered Buck Jones with particular fondness, for Tom Mix was an aloof and distant man, whereas Buck was was large-hearted, generous and personable fellow. After a while, Curley gave up the life of a stuntman because “I enjoyed singing. I didn’t enjoy getting busted into bits. Just no accounting for taste.”

He was a member of the Beverly Hill Billies, a hugely popular pioneering Western group in Southern California in the early 1930s. Pat Brady once remarked that he never missed a show by the Hill Billies, because it was blaring from every house as he walked down the street! Curley, performing under the name of “Joe”, worked with several different lineups of the Hill Billies, one of which was the 1933 group titled the “Tarzana Hill Billies”, which included a young Hubert Flatt (Ken Carson) and Shug Fisher.

In 1934, Curley joined Hubert “Shorty” Carson and another man named Jack Ross– nine years Curley’s senior– to form a trio they called “The Ranch Boys”. Their sole instrumentation was the 19-year-old Shorty Carson’s guitar. The three aspiring young men moved to Chicago to try their luck on the radio there and quickly landed a job on NBC, their one year contract turning into five years. They became known as “Radio’s favorite stars“, and were very popular. Curley had a large part in the dialogue of the show Pinto Pete and his Ranch Boys (also cast were Wade Lane as Pinto Pete and Shug Fisher as himself). His distinct Oklahoma drawl and tenor singing were well fitted to the Jimmie Rodgers- style of blue yodeling and singing, which he did a good deal of.

In 1935, the Ranch Boys became cast members for the popular children’s Western radio show The Tom Mix Show, sponsored by Ralston. Shorty and Jack had occasional bit parts, but Curley held the role of one of Mix’s sidekicks, Pecos, who was a loveable, big hearted cowboy who looked out for women and children and assisted Mix in doing good deeds and busting the bad guys.

The Ranch Boys split up in 1941, and in 1944 Curley became the lead actor in the Tom Mix show– playing the part of Mix himself!. He was “Tom Mix”, touring rodeos and making public appearances, acting on radio and caring for his horse, Tony, and all the things that come with being a star. His show started with the announcer proclaiming “The Tom Mix Ralston Straight Shooters are on the air!” and Curley shouting to his horse, “Up Tony, Up, Boy!” followed by the trademark and catchy Shredded Ralston jingle.

The photo shows Curley Bradley (left) as Tom Mix on the Grand Ole Opry with Ernest Tubb (standing center), and Eddie Arnold (standing right).

Curley Bradley was ‘Tom Mix’, the idol of countless children across America, whom he held spellbound every week with his radio show, until, as he explained laughingly at the age of 72, “And I decided that I was getting about ready to quit ‘cuz I was gettin’ too old, I thought. You know, I was gettin’ way up there.” so he retired, and returned to a ‘layman’ lifestyle, resuming his proper name of George Courtney. He still recalled his acting years and expressed appreciation when anyone approached him to talk about it. He lived in Orange County, California, until his death in 1985. He was 74 years old.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#977 Post by nrobertb » Sat Feb 09, 2019 10:27 am

In 1964 while working as a naturalist at Crater Lake National Park in Oregon, I got involved in bird banding, specifically the Clark’s Nutcrackers. We were trying to determine how long they lived and where they might travel. These birds are related to crows and jays and are quite smart.

In early morning at the crater rim village, there was not a bird to be seen. Around ten o'clock the tourists started to arrive and suddenly there were birds perched in the pine trees along the rim, where they would compete with the ground squirrels for nuts and bread tossed to them by the visitors. By late afternoon the tourists had left and so had the birds.

By trial and error I found that the only way to trap them for banding was to prop up a wire mesh cage, throw a peanut under it, and drop it on them when they went for the nut. One of the photos shows this. In this manner I trapped over 100 birds during the summer. However, once caught, they wouldn't fall for it a second time.

Eventually we found that they can live more than 20 years, which is a long time for small birds.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#978 Post by nrobertb » Sat Feb 09, 2019 5:32 pm

Great western character actors: Dabbs Greer was a very familiar face in films and especially on TV. He was a sort of "everyman" in his roles and played merchants, preachers, businessmen, and other "pillars of the community" types as well as assorted villains.He was born on April 2, 1917, in Fairview, Missouri, but reared in Anderson, Missouri. His first acting experience was on stage in a children's theatre production when he was eight years old. He attended Drury College in Springfield, Missouri, where he earned a BA and headed the drama department and Little Theatre in Mountain Grove, Missouri, from 1940-43. He then moved on to the famed Pasadena Playhouse in California as actor, instructor and administrator from 1943-50. He made his film debut in Reign of Terror (1949) (aka "The Black Book") in an uncredited bit part and went on to appear in many parts during the next 50 years. He is probably best remembered for his role as Rev. Alden on Little House on the Prairie (1974) but he was also a regular on the TV series Gunsmoke (1955) as a merchant, Mr. Jonas; Hank (1965) as Coach Ossie Weiss and Picket Fences (1992) as Rev. Henry Novotny. He also appeared in made-for-TV movies and guest-starred on such series as Adventures of Superman (1952); The Rifleman (1958); Wanted: Dead or Alive (1958); Trackdown (1957); Perry Mason (1957); Bonanza (1959); The Fugitive (1963) and The Brady Bunch (1969).

Greer's last role in a long and successful career, was in the hit movie, The Green Mile. He shared the starring role with Tom Hanks--Hanks as the younger version, Greer as the much older version--of lead character, Paul Edgecomb. Greer's character narrates throughout the entire film. It is from Greer's p.o.v. and memory flashbacks that the entire tale unfolds. He was 82 years old.

He played the first person saved by Superman in the very first episode of the Adventures of Superman (1952) television series. His role was uncredited. He was brought back to appear in a major role as an innocent man about to go to the electric chair in the first episode of the second season. He appeared for a third time in one of the final episodes of the series.

"Married" two of the most well-known couples on television. On The Dick Van Dyke Show (1961) he played the army chaplain who married Rob and Laura Petrie, and on The Brady Bunch (1969) he played the minister who married Mike and Carol Brady.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#979 Post by nrobertb » Sun Feb 10, 2019 1:39 am

A dawson 2 knife.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#980 Post by nrobertb » Sun Feb 10, 2019 1:43 pm

Capulin Volcano is an extinct cinder cone rising almost a thousand feet above the New Mexico plains. Every year in July, ladybugs by the thousand begin to appear on the trees at the highest point of the mountain, and remain as late as September. Are they migrating like birds and monarch butterflies? No one knows.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#981 Post by nrobertb » Sun Feb 10, 2019 6:18 pm

Here's a nice bolo tie with green fox turquoise.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#982 Post by nrobertb » Mon Feb 11, 2019 10:10 am

Here's a pair of Buermann "snowflake" spurs.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#983 Post by nrobertb » Mon Feb 11, 2019 4:21 pm

The Rogue River in southwestern Oregon flows about 215 miles in a generally westward direction from the Cascade Range to the Pacific Ocean. Known for its salmon runs, whitewater rafting, and rugged scenery, it was one of the original eight rivers named in the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act of 1968. Beginning near Crater Lake, which occupies the caldera left by the explosive volcanic eruption of Mount Mazama, the river flows through the geologically young High Cascades and the older Western Cascades, another volcanic province. Further west, the river passes through multiple exotic terranes of the more ancient Klamath Mountains. In the Kalmiopsis Wilderness section of the Rogue basin are some of the world's best examples of rocks that form the Earth's mantle. Near the mouth of the river, the only dinosaur fragments ever discovered in Oregon were found in the Otter Point Formation, along the coast of Curry County.

People have lived along the Rogue River and its tributaries for at least 8,500 years. European explorers made first contact with Native Americans toward the end of the 18th century and began beaver trapping and other activities in the region. Clashes, sometimes deadly, occurred between the natives and the trappers and later between the natives and European-American miners and settlers. These struggles culminated with the Rogue River Wars of 1855–56 and removal of most of the natives to reservations outside the basin. After the war, settlers expanded into remote areas of the watershed and established small farms along the river between Grave Creek and the mouth of the Illinois River. They were relatively isolated from the outside world until 1895, when the Post Office Department added mail-boat service along the lower Rogue. As of 2010, the Rogue has one of the two remaining rural mail-boat routes in the United States.

Although the Rogue Valley near Medford is partly urban, the average population density of the Rogue watershed is only about 32 people per square mile. Several historic bridges cross the river near the more populated areas. Many public parks, hiking trails, and campgrounds are near the river, which flows largely through forests, including national forests. Biodiversity in many parts of the basin is high; the Klamath-Siskiyou temperate coniferous forests, which extend into the southwestern Rogue basin, are among the four most diverse of this kind in the world.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#984 Post by nrobertb » Tue Feb 12, 2019 10:12 am

A sneaker wave or sleeper wave, is a disproportionately large coastal wave that can sometimes appear in a wave train without warning. The terminology is popular rather than scientific: there is no scientific coverage (or evidence) of the phenomenon as a distinct sort of wave with respect to height or predictability—as there is on other extreme wave events such as rogue waves. One American oceanographer distinguishes "rogue waves" as occurring on the ocean and sneaker waves as occurring at the shore.

Because they are much larger than preceding waves, sneaker waves can catch unwary swimmers, washing them out to sea. It is not uncommon for people walking or standing on beaches and ocean jetties to also be washed into the sea. Sneaker waves are mainly referred to in warnings and reports of incidents for the coasts of Northern California, Oregon and Washington. These sneaker waves also occur on the west coast of Canada, they are commonly seen in Tofino and Ucluelet.

In many parts of the world, local folklore predicts that out of a certain number of waves, one will be much larger than the rest. "Every seventh wave" or "every ninth wave" are examples of such common beliefs that have wide circulation and have entered popular culture through music, literature and art. These ideas have some scientific merit, due to the occurrence of wave groups at sea, but there is no explicit evidence for this specific phenomenon, or that these wave groups are related to sneaker waves. The saying is likely derived more from a cultural fascination with certain numbers, and it may also be designed to educate shore-dwellers about the necessity of remaining vigilant when near the ocean.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#985 Post by nrobertb » Tue Feb 12, 2019 3:09 pm

Here is a modern replica by Sawtooth Saddles of a saddle style made in St. Joseph, MO, around 1880 and used from Texas to Wyoming. A saddle cost around $30 at this time.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#986 Post by nrobertb » Wed Feb 13, 2019 10:44 am

A saddle by J.M. Capriola Co.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#987 Post by nrobertb » Wed Feb 13, 2019 4:46 pm

Newspaper Rock State Historic Monument is a Utah state monument featuring a rock panel carved with one of the largest known collections of petroglyphs. It is located in San Juan County, Utah, along Utah State Route 211, 28 miles northwest of Monticello and 53 miles (85 km) south of Moab.

It is along the relatively well-traveled access road into the Needles district of Canyonlands National Park, 12 miles from US 191 and 30 miles from the park boundary. The 200-square-foot rock is a part of the vertical Wingate sandstone cliffs that enclose the upper end of Indian Creek Canyon, and is covered by hundreds of petroglyphs—one of the largest, best preserved and easily accessed groups in the Southwest. The petroglyphs feature a mixture of human, animal, material and abstract forms. The first carvings at the Newspaper Rock site were made around 2,000 years ago, left by people from the Archaic, Anasazi, Fremont, Navajo, Anglo, and

The petroglyphs were carved by Native Americans during both the prehistoric and historic periods. There are over 650 rock art designs. The drawings on the rock are of different animals, human figures, and symbols. These carvings include pictures of deer, buffalo, and pronghorn antelope. Some glyphs depict riders on horses, while other images depict past events like in a newspaper. While precisely dating the rock carvings has been difficult, repatination of surface minerals reveals their relative ages. The reason for the large concentration of the petroglyphs is unclear.

The pictures at Newspaper Rock were inscribed into the dark coating on the rock, called desert varnish. Desert varnish is a blackish manganese-iron deposit that gradually forms on exposed sandstone cliff faces owing to the action of rainfall and bacteria. The ancient artists produced the many types of figures and patterns by carefully pecking the coated rock surfaces with sharpened tools to remove the desert varnish and expose the lighter rock beneath. The older figures are themselves becoming darker in color as new varnish slowly develops.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#988 Post by nrobertb » Thu Feb 14, 2019 12:36 am

Great western character actors: Born in Canada, John Ireland was raised in New York. Performing as a swimmer in a water carnival, he moved into the legitimate theater, often appearing in minor roles in Broadway plays. His first big break in pictures came in 1945 when he appeared as Windy the introspective letter-writing G.I. in the classic war epic A Walk in the Sun (1945). Ireland was then often featured (mostly as a heavy) in several films. In 1949, he was nominated for best supporting actor for his role as the reporter in All the King's Men (1949). During the early 1950s, Ireland often starred as the emoting, brooding hero, almost exclusively in "B" pictures. In 1953, with his son Peter Ireland and wife, Joanne Dru, Ireland co-produced and co-directed the western mini-classic Hannah Lee: An American Primitive (1953) (aka Outlaw Territory). From the mid-'50s on. he appeared mainly in Italian "quickie" features and showed up occasionally in supporting roles in major pictures (Spartacus (1960)). Occasionally, his name was mentioned in tabloids of the times, in connection with young starlets, namely Natalie Wood and Sue Lyon. He was to play the role of the patriarch on the Ponderosa in Bonanza: The Next Generation (1988) but the series was not picked up. In addition to Hannah Lee: An American Primitive (1953), his best work was in Little Big Horn (1951) and The Bushwhackers (1952). In his later years, he owned and operated a tiny restaurant, Ireland's, in Santa Barbara, California.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#989 Post by nrobertb » Thu Feb 14, 2019 1:38 pm

Valley of Fire is located 50 miles northeast of Las Vegas, at an elevation between 1,320–3,009 feet. It abuts the Lake Mead National Recreation Area on the east at the Virgin River confluence. It lies in a 4 by 6 mi. basin.

Complex uplifting and faulting of the region, followed by extensive erosion, have created the present landscape. The rough floor and jagged walls of the park contain brilliant formations of eroded sandstone and sand dunes more than 150 million years old. Other important rock formations include limestones, shales, and conglomerates.

Prehistoric users of the Valley of Fire included the Ancient Pueblo Peoples, also known as the Anasazi, who were farmers from the nearby fertile Moapa Valley. Their approximate span of occupation has been dated from 300 BC to 1150 AD. Their visits probably involved hunting, food gathering, and religious ceremonies, although scarcity of water would have limited their stay. Fine examples of rock art left by these ancient peoples can be found at several sites within the park.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#990 Post by nrobertb » Fri Feb 15, 2019 12:35 am

The Bingham Canyon Copper Mine is one of Utah’s most fascinating wonders. You would be a rare person to not enjoy a trip to the world’s deepest open-pit mine – just 45 minutes from Downtown Salt Lake City.

A day trip to Kennecott’s Bingham Canyon Copper Mine takes visitors southwest from Salt Lake City and onto the eastern flanks of the Oquirrh Mountains, roughly 25 miles from downtown. This mine, which occupies 1,900 acres and has a diameter of 2.5 miles, has multiple entrance points. Those heading to the Visitor Center – the only option for tourists – will take UT 111 to the mine’s southeastern entrance.

The Visitor Center, which stands in front of the mine itself, serves as an excellent starting point for the day’s exploration. Here guests can learn about the mine’s long history, complex infrastructure, incredible machinery and unique geology by way of photographs, illustrations, hands-on exhibits and demonstrations. Use the center’s 3D microscopes to examine geology samples or check out historic mining equipment artifacts. Before leaving, spend 16 minutes in the 90-person theater watching a fascinating movie on the mine’s history, current operations and future plans.

After your stop in the Visitor Center, you can walk onto an overlook and witness the actual mine itself. Beneath the overlook, this gaping chasm gives visitors a spectacular sensation of exposure. The mine itself, in production for nearly 110 years, is presently 4,000 (0.75 miles) deep.

Standing on the overlook, visitors can listen to a descriptive audio recording (playable in several languages) describing the goings on of the world’s largest man-made excavation. 240- and 320-ton capacity trucks, which look like ants from the overlook, drive along the more than 500 road miles contained within the mine to deliver crude ore to the in-pit crusher. There the ore is reduced to soccer ball-sized chunks that are then taken to the Coppperton Concentrator by way of a 5-mile conveyor.

Currently the second largest copper producer in the United States, the Bingham Canyon Mine yields roughly 300,000 tons of refined copper each year. In its history, the mine has produced a world-record 18.1 million tons of copper. Additionally, the mine produces 4 million ounces of silver and 400,000 ounces of gold annually, as well as numerous other essential elements that help make up everyday wares like cell phones, shampoo, food, medicine and hybrid cars.
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