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Spurs and the Great West

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nrobertb
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#601 Post by nrobertb » Sat Jul 21, 2018 10:01 am

Ah yes, who can forget The Lone Ranger, which ran on TV from 1949-57 with Clayton Moore and Jay Silverheels as Tonto.

Clayton Moore grew up in Chicago, Illinois and although his father wanted him to become a doctor, he had visions of something a little more glamorous. Naturally athletic, he practiced gymnastics during family summer vacations in Canada, eventually joining the trapeze act The Flying Behrs at 19. During the 1934 Chicago World's Fair, Clayton performed in the position of catcher. Playing off his good looks, he was signed by the John Robert Powers modeling agency and enjoyed a print career in NY for several years. But a friend urged him to make the move to Hollywood in 1938 where he entered films as a bit player and stuntman. In 1940, at the suggestion of his agent Edward Small, he changed his first name from Jack to Clayton. Beginning with Perils of Nyoka (1942), he eventually became King of the Serials at Republic Studios appearing in more than cliffhanger star Buster Crabbe. During this period, he also worked in many B westerns earning his acting chops along side Roy Rogers, Gene Autry and interestingly Jay Silverheels. Later in 1942 he entered the military, was stationed in Kingman, Arizona and assigned entertainment duties including the production of training films. After the war, he returned to these supporting roles while concentrating on westerns. His turn as Ghost of Zorro (1949) came to the attention of the radio's hugely successful Lone Ranger producer George W. Trendle who was casting the lead role for the new television series. After the interview, Trendle said, "Mr. Moore would you like the role of the Lone Ranger?" Moore replied, "Mr. Trendle, I AM The Lone Ranger." The premiere episode appeared on ABC on September 15, 1949 and was the first western specifically written for the new medium.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#602 Post by nrobertb » Sat Jul 21, 2018 4:53 pm

Any time you visit a blacksmith shop you see many sets of tongs, which are for picking up any conceivable shape of metal. If a smith didn't have exactly what he needed, he could make them very quickly.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#603 Post by nrobertb » Sat Jul 21, 2018 8:19 pm

Thomas Edwin Mix (born Thomas Hezikiah Mix; January 6, 1880 – October 12, 1940) was an American film actor and the star of many early Western movies between 1909 and 1935. Mix appeared in 291 films, all but nine of which were silent movies. He was Hollywood's first Western star and helped define the genre as it emerged in the early days of the cinema.

Most of Mix's radio work has been lost over the years; recordings of only approximately 30 scattered episodes, and no complete story arcs, survive.

On October 12, 1940, after visiting Pima County Sheriff Ed Echols in Tucson, Arizona, Mix headed north toward Phoenix driving his 1937 Cord 812 Phaeton. He stopped to call his agent at the Oracle Junction Inn, a popular gambling and drinking establishment, then continued toward Phoenix. About eighteen miles south of Florence, Mix came upon construction barriers at a bridge washed away by a flash flood. Unable to stop in time, his car swerved twice, then overturned in a gully. A large aluminum suitcase containing money, traveler's checks, and jewels, situated on the package shelf behind his head, hurtled forward and struck him, breaking his neck. He was 60 years old.

Mix was the acknowledged "King of Cowboys" when Ronald Reagan and John Wayne were young, and the influence of his screen persona can be seen in their approach to portraying cowboys. When an injury caused football player Marion Morrison (later known as John Wayne) to drop out of the University of Southern California, Mix helped him find work moving props in the back lot of Fox Studios. That was the beginning of Wayne's Hollywood career.

Mix made 291 movies throughout his career. As of 2007, only about 10% of these are known to be available for viewing

In the photo he is seated with the only surviving member of the bank robbing Dalton Gang. The inscription says something about "I'll pray that hell is no hotter for you than it is for me."
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#604 Post by nrobertb » Tue Jul 24, 2018 3:09 pm

My computer is in the shop for repairs, but I shall return.

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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#605 Post by nrobertb » Thu Jul 26, 2018 11:14 pm

I don't think I showed this Blue Ape knife before.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#606 Post by nrobertb » Fri Jul 27, 2018 12:49 am

Bonanaza was one of the longest running TV westerns, from 1959-72. The Cartwright's one-thousand square mile Ponderosa Ranch is located near Virginia City, Nevada, site of the Comstock Silver Lode, during and after the Civil War. Each of the sons was born to a different wife of Ben's; none of the mothers is still alive. Adventures are typical western ones, with lots of personal relationships/problems thrown in as well.

Starring were Lorne Greene (who later became Commander Adama on Battlestar Galactica), Pernell Roberts (who left the series early because he thought the plots were lame but never hit the big time again), Dan Blocker (who died just before the series ended) and Michael Landon (who became "Pa" on Little House on the Prairie.)
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#607 Post by nrobertb » Fri Jul 27, 2018 5:08 pm

Taos Pueblo (or Pueblo de Taos) is an ancient pueblo belonging to a Taos-speaking (Tiwa) Native American tribe of Puebloan people. It lies about 1 mile north of the modern city of Taos, New Mexico. The pueblos are considered to be one of the oldest continuously inhabited communities in the United States. This has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Taos Pueblo is a member of the Eight Northern Pueblos, whose people speak two variants of the Tanoan language. The Taos community is known for being one of the most private, secretive, and conservative pueblos. A reservation of 95,000 acres is attached to the pueblo, and about 4,500 people live in this area.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#608 Post by nrobertb » Fri Jul 27, 2018 11:10 pm

Early blacksmith shops used a set of bellows to pump air through the coal fire and keep it hot. These were double chambered so one half was sucking in air while the other was pushing it into the fire. A single chambered bellows could draw super heated gas back into itself and explode. They came in various sizes. The one in my shop is 42' wide. I know they made them as large as 50". Some shops had them set up in a frame on the floor. Other shops hung them from the ceiling to get them out of the way. Wooden flapper valves alternately opened and closed.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#609 Post by nrobertb » Sat Jul 28, 2018 10:35 am

Bright Angel Lodge is a hotel complex at the South Rim of the Grand Canyon in Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. Designed by architect Mary Jane Colter, the lodge is a complex of cabins around a central lodge building, directly on the edge of the canyon. The rustic lodge complex is a major contributing structure in the Grand Canyon Village National Historic Landmark District.

The lodge is a large structure with a simple shallow-pitched gable roof. The roof overhangs at the main entry to form a gabled porch supported by peeled log posts. Colter used shed-roofed appendages to create a layered effect for the mass of the main lodge. Interior finishes included hand-adzed logs, adobe and local limestone. The stone fireplace materials reproduce the strata found in the Grand Canyon along the Bright Angel Trail in their correct sequence from bottom to top. The semi-detached cabins are laid out in the space between the lodge and the canyon's rim, with some directly overlooking the canyon. Cabins were furnished with antiques and reproductions hand-picked by Colter. The lodge's cocktail lounge features murals by Hopi artist Fred Kabotie.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#610 Post by nrobertb » Sat Jul 28, 2018 8:50 pm

Nambé Oweenge Pueblo is a census-designated place in Santa Fe County, New Mexico, United States and a federally recognized tribe of Native American Pueblo people. The Pueblo of Nambé has existed since the 14th century and is a member of the Eight Northern Pueblos. It was a primary cultural, economic, and religious center at the time of the arrival of Spanish colonists in the very early 17th century. The community of Nambe is separate from the pueblo. Nambé was one of the Pueblos that organized and participated in the Pueblo Revolt of 1680, trying to expel the Spanish from the area.

Nambé is the Spanish version of a similar-sounding Tewa word, which can be interpreted loosely as meaning "rounded earth." The word "pueblo" stems from the Spanish word for "village." Pueblo refers both to the Southwestern style architecture and the people themselves. The Nambé's language is a dialect of the Tewa language.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#611 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jul 29, 2018 10:38 am

By 1900 many blacksmiths had abandoned the bellows in favor of a hand cranked, cast iron squirrel cage blower. It took up less room, was easier to use, and provided a better air stream.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#612 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jul 29, 2018 9:23 pm

The El Tovar Hotel, also known simply as El Tovar, is a former Harvey House hotel situated directly on the south rim of the Grand Canyon in Arizona.

The hotel was opened in 1905 as one of a chain of hotels and restaurants owned and operated by the Fred Harvey Company in conjunction with the Santa Fe railway whose Grand Canyon Depot was 100 meters away.

The hotel is one of only a handful of Harvey House facilities that are still in operation, and is an early example of the style that would evolve into National Park Service Rustic architecture. The Hotel is also featured in the 1983 film, National Lampoon's Vacation.

The hotel opened in 1905, before the Grand Canyon was a formally protected Federal park, following on the heels of President Theodore Roosevelt's 1903 visit to the canyon.

The Grand Canyon Game Preserve was established by Roosevelt's executive order in 1906, expanding protections granted by President Benjamin Harrison in 1893. The Grand Canyon National Monument was proclaimed in 1908, and Grand Canyon National Park was finally established by Congress in 1919.

The hotel was built as a "destination resort", providing a high level of comfort and luxury standing literally on the edge of the wilderness, 20 feet from the rim of the canyon. The El Tovar was one of the first such hotels in national parks, part of a trend in which railroads would build large hotels in newly-accessible scenic locations like Yellowstone and Glacier National Parks, stimulating tourist traffic to those destinations. The railroads consciously employed architectural design in keeping with the image they wished to convey, a superficially rustic resort that provided a comfortable retreat.

Roosevelt returned to stay at the El Tovar in 1911, and again in 1913, writing a book about his 1913 trip. The El Tovar was built from local limestone and Oregon pine. The lower portions of the building are mainly of log construction, yielding to lighter, smoother framed construction sheathed with planking for the upper levels.

There were originally 103 guest rooms and 21 guest bathrooms, now 78 guest rooms, all with private bath. Rooms arranged on either side of central corridors through the wings.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#613 Post by nrobertb » Mon Jul 30, 2018 9:51 am

Most anvils have two holes in the top. The larger square one is called the hardy hole. A hardy is a chisel used for cutting metal, hot or cold. There are a whole range of other anvil tools that fit in the hardy hole, such as the bending fork shown in the photo.

The smaller round one is called the pritchel hole. A pritchel is a type of punch with a rectangular end, primarily used for putting the nail holes in horseshoes. If you are punching through hot metal, you don't want to damage the end of the punch or the surface of the anvil, so you punch into the pritchel hole.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#614 Post by nrobertb » Mon Jul 30, 2018 6:46 pm

Red Ryder ran on TV from 1951-56. Alan Lane reprises his Red Ryder role from the big screen to this formula western series. The series fell short on drama and plot; by this time audiences were gravitating to the more adult westerns like "Cheyenne", "Wyatt Earp", and "Gunsmoke". It's still a fun watch for nostalgia's sake and to hear the over-dub of "ROLL THUNDER!" Louis Lettieri was Little Beaver.

Daisy BB Guns cashed in big time with their Red Ryder lever action model. I still have mine, a birthday present around 1950.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#615 Post by nrobertb » Tue Jul 31, 2018 9:59 am

Sandia Pueblo is a federally recognized tribe of Native American Pueblo people inhabiting a 39 sq. mi. reservation of the same name in the eastern Rio Grande Rift of central New Mexico. It is one of 19 of New Mexico's Native American pueblos, considered as one of the state's Eastern Pueblos. The population was 427 as of the 2010 census. The people are traditionally Tiwa speakers, a language of the Tanoan group, although retention of the traditional language has waned with later generations. The Tiwa name for the pueblo is Tuf Shur Tia, or "Green Reed Place", in reference to the green bosque (Spanish: forest). However, older documents claim that the original name of the pueblo was Nafiat, (Tiwa: "Place Where the Wind Blows Dust").

The pueblo is located three miles south of Bernalillo off Highway 85 in southern Sandoval County and northern Bernalillo County. It is bounded by the city of Albuquerque to the south and by the foothills of the Sandia Mountains to the east. A forested area known as the bosque surrounds the rest of the reservation, and serves as a source of firewood and wild game.

The Pueblo culture developed from 700–1100, characterized by its distinctive religious beliefs and practices and a large growth in population. The period from 1100 to 1300 CE is known as the Great Pueblo Period, and is marked by cooperation between the Pueblo peoples and the communal Great Kiva ritual. The Sandia Pueblo has resided in its current location since the 14th century, when they comprised over 20 pueblos. They were a thriving community, numbering 3,000 at the time of the arrival of Coronado in 1539.
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