Well, the board is either fixed, or it's going to run terribly. Cross your fingers and hope for the best. I'm at my technical limit right now.

Spurs and the Great West

Message
Author
indy1919a4
Member
Member
Posts: 380
Joined: Sat Jun 10, 2017 12:23 pm
Age: 56
Location: Indianapolis, Indiana
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#586 Post by indy1919a4 » Tue Jul 17, 2018 9:26 am

Is there any documents about the prices a Blacksmith charged for his work in the day???

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 705
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#587 Post by nrobertb » Tue Jul 17, 2018 9:55 am

In the early 1900's, the average price for fitting a horse with new shoes was 80 cents, parts and labor included (about $22 today). If the blacksmith was asked to take off the old shoes, caulk the hooves, and then place the old shoes back-- somewhat like a past equivalent of rotating tires-- the blacksmith would charge approximately 40 cents. While it might not have been posted, there was an unspoken understanding about the going rate for almost every blacksmithing task, from making anchors to oyster rakes. Alex Nicholson, a blacksmith from Clinton in the early 1900's, charged 20 cents to sharpen a coulter (or turf-cutter) on farm machinery. Having your pot repaired would set you back 20 cents, and getting your buggy running smoothly again usually ran in the vicinity of 65 cents.
Attachments
shop.jpg

Hammy
Member
Member
Posts: 56
Joined: Sun Jun 04, 2017 9:25 am
Location: Illinois
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#588 Post by Hammy » Tue Jul 17, 2018 11:07 am

When I was a kid, we lived in a big 2 story farm house on about 20 acres, which was mostly timbered pasture with 2 big barns and 2 horses. We would feed the horses every day, and muck out the stalls twice a year to get a break on the rent. The landlord and his wife would show up every Saturday to go for a ride, and once a month he would come out by himself to reshoe the horses. My older brother and I would help him. I remember turning the crank on the bellows to get the fire hotter while he forged the shoes. He would peel off the old shoes, file the hooves down, then fit the new shoes. I remember the "aroma" of the hooves when he put the hot shoes on to check for fit, and the ringing sound of the anvil when he was pounding on the new shoes. Ah, the memories. I have said it before, I'll say it again; I never thought this thread would last very long when you started it, but man, it has made for some very interesting reading. Keep 'em coming!
U.S. Marine Corps 1975-1979
Combat Engineer

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 705
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#589 Post by nrobertb » Tue Jul 17, 2018 3:55 pm

Thanks for the comment. I always enjoy hearing from folks.

Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico is located in New MexicoJemez Pueblo, New Mexico
Nearest city Bernalillo, New Mexico
Built 1700

Jemez Pueblo is a census-designated place in Sandoval County, New Mexico. The population was 1,788 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Albuquerque Metropolitan Statistical Area.

The CDP is named after the pueblo at its center. Among Pueblo members it is known as Walatowa.

It seems that a significant part of the Jemez Pueblo population originates from the surviving remnant of the Pecos Pueblo population who fled to Jemez Pueblo in 1838.

The Jemez speak a Kiowa–Tanoan language also known as Jemez or Towa.
Attachments
jemez2.jpg
jemez.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 705
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#590 Post by nrobertb » Tue Jul 17, 2018 5:48 pm

Every blacksmith shop had a post drill (mounted on a post). It was hand cranked and had two sets of gears. One turned the drill bit and the other moved the bit downwards. The speed of the descent was controlled by a pawl on the horizontal notches at the top. You see a lot of these with the stage broken off. It was cast iron, and if an unwary smith used too much downward pressure, it would break the stage.

The original blacksmith drill bits all had a half inch diameter shaft, regardless of the size of the bit. If you want to use one with today's bits, you need an adapter to take a modern adjustable chuck.
Attachments
postdrill.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 705
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#591 Post by nrobertb » Tue Jul 17, 2018 10:19 pm

The Gene Autry Show ran on TV from 1950-55. The already legendary singing cowboy rode with his comic pal Pat Buttram from town to town bringing justice, song and his horse Champion to the old Southwest.

In 1928 he began singing on a local radio station, and three years later he had his own show and was making his first recordings. Three years after that he made his film debut in Ken Maynard's In Old Santa Fe (1934) and starred in a 13-part serial the following year for Mascot Pictures, The Phantom Empire (1935). The next year he signed a contract with Republic Pictures and began making westerns. Autry--for better or worse--pretty much ushered in the era of the "singing cowboy" westerns of the 1930s and 1940s. These films often grossed ten times their average $50,000 production costs. During World War II he enlisted in the US Army and was assigned as a flight officer from 1942-46 with the Air Transport Command. After his military service he returned to making movies, this time with Columbia Pictures, and finally with his own company, Flying A Productions, which, during the 1950s, produced his TV series The Gene Autry Show (1950), The Adventures of Champion (1955), and Annie Oakley (1954). He wrote over 200 songs. A savvy businessman, he retired from acting in the early 1960s and became a multi-millionaire from his investments in hotels, real estate, radio stations and the California Angels professional baseball team.
Attachments
gene.jpg
gene.jpg (18.66 KiB) Viewed 239 times
d.jpg
d.jpg (13.52 KiB) Viewed 239 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 705
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#592 Post by nrobertb » Wed Jul 18, 2018 8:38 pm

Every blacksmith shop had a swage (often pronounced swedge) block. It gives the smith a lot of ways to shape metal. The one in the photo is 260 lbs., which is what we have in our shop. The grooves on the edge are good for straightening bent rods or pipe, or you can make a square piece round. Each groove has a hammer that is the right size to make a circle, but you don't swing it like a nail hammer. You set it on top and your helper hits it with a ledge hammer.
Attachments
swageblock.jpg
swage.JPG

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 705
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#593 Post by nrobertb » Thu Jul 19, 2018 9:33 am

The Roy Rogers Show ran on TV from 1951-57. The Double R Ranch featured "The King of the Cowboys" Roy, his "Smartest Horse in the Movies" Trigger, "Queen of the West" Dale, her horse Buttermilk, their dog Bullet, and even Pat's jeep, Nellybelle.

Roy Rogers (born Leonard Slye) moved to California in 1930, aged 18. He played in such musical groups as The Hollywood Hillbillies, Rocky Mountaineers, Texas Outlaws, and his own group, the International Cowboys. In 1934 he formed a group with Bob Nolan called Sons of the Pioneers. While in that group he was known as Leonard Slye, then Dick Weston. Their songs included "Cool Water" and "Tumbling Tumbleweeds". They first appeared in the western Rhythm on the Range (1936), starring Bing Crosby and Martha Raye. In 1936 he appeared as a bandit opposite Gene Autry in "The Old Coral". In 1937 Rogers went solo from "The Sons Of The Pioneers", and made his first starring film in 1938, Under Western Stars (1938). He made almost 100 films.
Attachments
roy2.jpg
roy.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 705
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#594 Post by nrobertb » Thu Jul 19, 2018 6:12 pm

A pair of Buermann spurs.
Attachments
Buerma9.jpg
Buerma9.jpg (17.13 KiB) Viewed 218 times

ffuries
Member
Member
Posts: 391
Joined: Fri Jun 02, 2017 8:51 pm
Age: 50
Location: Panama City, Florida
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#595 Post by ffuries » Thu Jul 19, 2018 9:38 pm

nrobertb wrote:
Thu Jul 19, 2018 9:33 am
The Roy Rogers Show ran on TV from 1951-57. The Double R Ranch featured "The King of the Cowboys" Roy, his "Smartest Horse in the Movies" Trigger, "Queen of the West" Dale, her horse Buttermilk, their dog Bullet, and even Pat's jeep, Nellybelle.

Roy Rogers (born Leonard Slye) moved to California in 1930, aged 18. He played in such musical groups as The Hollywood Hillbillies, Rocky Mountaineers, Texas Outlaws, and his own group, the International Cowboys. In 1934 he formed a group with Bob Nolan called Sons of the Pioneers. While in that group he was known as Leonard Slye, then Dick Weston. Their songs included "Cool Water" and "Tumbling Tumbleweeds". They first appeared in the western Rhythm on the Range (1936), starring Bing Crosby and Martha Raye. In 1936 he appeared as a bandit opposite Gene Autry in "The Old Coral". In 1937 Rogers went solo from "The Sons Of The Pioneers", and made his first starring film in 1938, Under Western Stars (1938). He made almost 100 films.
Was at the Long John Silvers in Victorville CA with the wife and in laws right before I PCSed to Germany in 1988. Victorville is right next to Apple Valley where the Roy Rogers Museum was. Anyways in comes Roy Rogers and Dale Evans and another older couple and took the table next to us. I was like hey that is RR and DE, in which my wife replied who? She honestly had no ideal who they were. RR and company had a laugh about it, was very cordial and polite, and visited with us for a while, had lunch with us. They autographed the placemat for me, hell if I know what my parents did with it.
Mike
TSgt, USAF Retired
Jan 86 - Sept 08
Aircrew Life Support
"Your Life Is Our Business"
(122X0, 1T1X1, 1P0X1)
NRA Life Member

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 705
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#596 Post by nrobertb » Thu Jul 19, 2018 11:40 pm

San Ildefonso Pueblo ("where the water cuts through") is a census-designated place in Santa Fe County, New Mexico, United States, and a federally recognized tribe, established c. 1300 C.E. The Pueblo is self-governing and is part of the Santa Fe, New Mexico Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 524 as of the 2010 census. San Ildefonso Pueblo is a member of the Eight Northern Pueblos, and the pueblo people are from the Tewa ethnic group of Native Americans, who speak the Tewa language.

The Pueblo was founded when people migrated from the Mesa Verde complex in Southern Colorado, by way of Bandelier, just south of present-day Los Alamos, New Mexico. People thrived at Bandelier due to the rainfall and the ease of constructing living structures from the surrounding soft volcanic rock. But after a prolonged drought, the people moved down into the valleys of the Rio Grande around 1300 C.E. The Rio Grande and other arroyos provided the water for irrigation.

The people of San Ildefonso continued to lead an agricultural based economy until the early 20th century when Maria Martinez and her husband Julian Martinez rediscovered how to make the Black-on-Black pottery for which San Ildefonso Pueblo would soon become famous. From that time the Pueblo has become more tourist-oriented, with numerous tourist shops existing in the Pueblo. Because of close proximity to the state capital, Santa Fe, and the presence of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, many of those employed in the pueblo have government jobs.
Attachments
San2.jpg
San.jpg
Last edited by nrobertb on Fri Jul 20, 2018 10:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 705
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#597 Post by nrobertb » Fri Jul 20, 2018 10:25 am

Sunset Crater is a cinder cone located north of Flagstaff in U.S. State of Arizona. The crater is within the Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument.

Sunset Crater is the youngest in a string of volcanoes (the San Francisco volcanic field) that is related to the nearby San Francisco Peaks.

The date of the eruptions that formed the 340-meter-high cone (1,120 ft) derived from geologic and archaeological evidence places the eruption around A.D. 1085. The largest vent of the eruption, Sunset Crater itself, was the source of the Bonito and Kana-a lava flows that extended about 2.5 kilometers (1.6 mi) NW and 9.6 kilometers (6 mi) NE, respectively. Additional vents along a 10-kilometer-long fissure (6.2 mi) extending SE produced small spatter ramparts and a 6.4-kilometer-long lava flow (4 mi) to the east. The Sunset Crater eruption produced a blanket of ash and lapilli covering an area of more than 2,100 square kilometers (810 sq mi) and forced the temporary abandonment of settlements of the local Sinagua people. The volcano has partially revegetated, with pines and wildflowers. Since the last eruption of the volcano is a recent occurrence, it is considered dormant by volcanologists.

On June 5, 2015, a website with satellite images reported steam rising from the crater, leading to fears that Sunset Crater was erupting. The cause of the steam was later determined to be a forest fire, and geologists stated that the volcano was extinct.

Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument is a U.S. National Monument in the north-central part of the U.S. state of Arizona, created to protect Sunset Crater, a cinder cone within the San Francisco Volcanic Field. The monument is managed by the National Park Service in close conjunction with nearby Wupatki National Monument. In 1928, a Hollywood film company - Famous Players-Lasky Corporation - planned to detonate large quantities of explosives on the side of Sunset Crater in order to create an avalanche for Zane Grey's motion picture, Avalanche. Public outcry over this plan led in part to the proclamation of Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument by President Herbert Hoover in 1930.
Attachments
Sunset2.jpg
Sunset.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 705
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#598 Post by nrobertb » Fri Jul 20, 2018 4:48 pm

“A rock is a rock, a tree is a tree. Shoot it in Griffith Park". This was an oft-repeated dictum of cost-conscious movie producers during the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s, and resulted in many companies heading for the “wilds” of Griffith Park.

Griffith Park is a large municipal park at the eastern end of the Santa Monica Mountains, in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. The park covers 4,310 acres of land, making it one of the largest urban parks in North America. It is the second-largest city park in California, It has also been referred to as the Central Park of Los Angeles but is much larger, more untamed, and rugged than its New York City counterpart.

Griffith Park was the busiest destination in Los Angeles for on-location filming in 2011, with 346 production days. Projects included the TV shows Criminal Minds and The Closer. With its wide variety of scenes and close proximity to Hollywood and Burbank, many different production crews have found new ways and angles to film the same spots and make them look different. One would be hard pressed to find a spot in Griffith Park which has not been filmed or taped.

It was used for the road scenes in Sunset Boulevard (1950).
It was used as a location in the first two Back to the Future movies. In the first movie (released in 1985) it was used for Marty McFly's starting point when accelerating to 88 mph in the film's climax, and in the second movie (released in 1989) it was used for the "River Road Tunnel" scene when Marty was trying to get the almanac back from Biff Tannen.
The same tunnel was used as the entrance to Toontown in Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988).
The tunnel was also featured in a scene in Throw Momma From the train (1987)
The park was also featured in the Robert Altman movie Short Cuts (1993).
The tunnel was used as the entrance to the NORAD complex in WarGames (1983).
The area around the observatory is used extensively in La La Land (2016).
Music:
The park was the location for Adam Lambert's music video for his single, "If I Had You".
Griffith Park was the location used in Ellie Goulding's music video "Guns and Horses".
The silver Trans Am in the Simple Plan music video for Untitled (How Could This Happen to Me?) is seen driving out of the tunnel just before the head on crash.
Television - sampling of television shows filmed here includes:
An episode of Remington Steele in which Laura Holt is trying to evade the police
The Nickelodeon show Salute Your Shorts
Certain scenes of Full House were taped here
Some specific sites within the park that have appeared in media include:

Bronson Canyon, aka Bronson Caves, is a popular location for motion picture and television filming, especially of western and science fiction low-budget films, including Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956). The site was also used as the location for the climactic scene in John Ford's classic western, The Searchers (1956). The scene includes John Wayne cornering his niece, Debbie (Natalie Wood), in one of the caves with the apparent intent of killing her. He relents at the last moment, however, and in the film's most famous shot, picks her up in his arms and turns to carry her back home. Many fans of the film are startled by the revelation that this scene was actually filmed in urban Los Angeles, probably due to how well the shot is integrated into the rest of the picture's location scenery. The craggy site of an old quarry, a tunnel in this canyon was also used as the entrance to the Batcave in the opening sequence of the 1960s Batman television series, and in numerous other shows. The natural "cave" walls are preserved by the many layers of paint used to make them look like rock.

The Griffith Observatory, which sits atop the southern slope of Mount Hollywood, was featured prominently in the classic Rebel Without a Cause (1955). A bronze bust of the film's star James Dean is on the grounds just outside the dome. Other movies filmed here include The Terminator (1984), Disney's The Rocketeer (1991), The Majestic (2001), Stephen Sommer's film Van Helsing (2004), and Yes Man (2008). The area of the park around the Observatory also appears as a location in the role-playing video game Vampire: The Masquerade – Bloodlines (2004), which is set in Los Angeles. Griffith Park and Griffith Observatory are significant in the Star Trek: Voyager episode "Future's End". The crew are thrown into the past and Griffith Observatory discovers Voyager. The tunnel was also used in the 1960s spy television series Mission: Impossible.
Attachments
Griffith2.jpg
Griffith.jpg
Griffith.jpg (36.39 KiB) Viewed 198 times
Last edited by nrobertb on Fri Jul 20, 2018 10:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 705
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#599 Post by nrobertb » Fri Jul 20, 2018 8:53 pm

That was a nice story about Roy Rogers. Thanks for sharing. I noticed in the photo I posted that Dale is wearing a pistol. I wonder if she ever fired one in all those movies?

Trivia: Griffith Park has at least one resident mountain lion. Hikers better keep their dogs leashed.

User avatar
nrobertb
Bullet Banger
Bullet Banger
Posts: 705
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#600 Post by nrobertb » Fri Jul 20, 2018 10:20 pm

In 1927, Paramount Studios purchased a 2,700-acre ranch on Medea Creek in the Santa Monica Mountains near Agoura Hills, between Malibu and the Conejo Valley. The studio built numerous large-scale sets on the ranch, including a huge replica of early San Francisco and an Old West town. It posed as Tombstone, Arizona and Dodge City, Kansas, as well as Tom Sawyer's Missouri, 13th-century China, and many other locales and eras around the world.

It is now Paramount Ranch Park in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area.

Since then, the older sets have been removed, but there is a western town at the location for visitors to view. This remaining set of buildings continued to be used in filming, notably for the Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman television series and the short lived HBO series Carnivàle.

The Paramount Movie Ranch was also the home of the original Renaissance Faire from 1966 to 1989, and continues to be the home of the Topanga Banjo•Fiddle Contest, held each May.

Paramount Ranch was most recently used as a filming location for season 3 of Escape the Night, a Youtube Premium show by Joey Graceffa.

Something I noticed when I visited the ranch in 1987 is that the tops of the door frames are lower than normal, to make the actors appear taller. At. 5'10" I could barely get through without hitting my head.
Attachments
paramount2.jpg
paramount.jpg

Post Reply

Return to “General Off Topic”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests