Well, the board is either fixed, or it's going to run terribly. Cross your fingers and hope for the best. I'm at my technical limit right now.

Spurs and the Great West

Message
Author
User avatar
nrobertb
Gun Nut
Gun Nut
Posts: 830
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#496 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jun 24, 2018 12:32 pm

Did you play with cap guns as a kid? I sure did. There were a million different kinds.

A cap gun, cap pistol, or cap rifle is a toy gun that creates a loud sound simulating a gunshot and a puff of smoke when a small percussion cap is exploded. Cap guns were originally made of cast iron, but after World War II were made of zinc alloy, and most newer models are made of plastic.

Cap guns get their name from the small discs of shock-sensitive explosive compounds (roughly 1.4 to 1.6 millimetres in diameter) that provide the noise and smoke, effectively the same as the Maynard tape primer and percussion caps used in real firearms of the mid to late 1800's but usually smaller and made from cheap plastic or paper. Some are arranged in plastic rings of eight or twelve. There are also single caps, roll caps (of 50 to 500), disk caps, and cap strips all of which are actually extremely small versions of percussion fireworks. Armstrong's mixture is often used today as the explosive, but previously the tiny powder charge was a simple mixture of potassium perchlorate, sulfur, and antimony sulfide sandwiched between two paper layers which hold in the gases long enough to give a sound report when the cap is struck.
Attachments
CAP2.jpg
CAP.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Gun Nut
Gun Nut
Posts: 830
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#497 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jun 24, 2018 4:16 pm

Joseph Kilgore founded the toy gun business in Homestead, PA in 1917. By 1919 Kilgore moved his business to Westerville, Ohio and expanded it by leaps and bounds. By the 1930s The Kilgore Manufacturing Company was producing 25,000 cap guns and 100,000 rolls of caps each day.

Around 1985, Kilgore stopped the production of cap guns. In 1991, the production of caps ended when the cap making machines were sold to a company in New York. The Kilgore Corporation was acquired in 2001 by a British company and is now known as Kilgore Flares LLC, a member of the Chemring Group. Kilgore has been involved in many ventures throughout its history, but two areas, toy cap pistols and pyrotechnics have always been the mainstay of the business. Today, the toys and caps are no more, but Kilgore Flares is a known leader throughout the world in the development and production of airborne expendable countermeasure decoy flares.
Attachments
caps2.jpg
caps.jpeg
caps.jpeg (14.96 KiB) Viewed 1141 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Gun Nut
Gun Nut
Posts: 830
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#498 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jun 24, 2018 7:53 pm

26 Men ran from 1957-59. Based on the true characters of Captain Tom Rynning and Ranger Clint Travis, 26 Men was in the tradition of Death Valley Days, providing true stories of the exploits of the Arizona Rangers. Modeled on the Texas Rangers, the Arizona Rangers did a lot in cleaning up the outlaw element in the Territory so that it was disbanded in 1909 and Arizona was admitted to the union as our 48th state in 1912.

Tristram Coffin was the lead character. He was one of those guys you would see in a TV show and say, now where do I know him from?
Attachments
26two.jpeg
26.jpg
26.jpg (18.21 KiB) Viewed 1136 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Gun Nut
Gun Nut
Posts: 830
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#499 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jun 24, 2018 11:14 pm

Annie Oakley ran from 1954-57. A fictionalized account of the life of legendary Wild West sharpshooter Annie Oakley, set in the quiet western town of Diablo, Annie and her little brother Tagg made sure that outlaws who moseyed into town kept on going. Often at her side was friend, suitor and deputy sheriff Lofty Craig with whom she often showed off her shooting prowess.

Gail Davis played Annie and was the first woman to be the lead in a western TV series. She did all her own stunts, being a rodeo class rider and an accomplished trick shot.
Attachments
annie2.jpg
annie2.jpg (24.21 KiB) Viewed 1132 times
annie.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Gun Nut
Gun Nut
Posts: 830
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#500 Post by nrobertb » Mon Jun 25, 2018 10:04 am

Here's a hatchet with a Damascus blade.
Attachments
hatchet.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Gun Nut
Gun Nut
Posts: 830
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#501 Post by nrobertb » Mon Jun 25, 2018 2:37 pm

The 1950's and 60's were truly the age of the western on TV. I have 30 more on my list now. In addition to the series that were straight westerns, there were others like Playhouse 90 that had an occasional western themed episode.

Buffalo Bill Jr. ran on TV from 1955-56 with Dickie Jones in the title role. Buffalo Bill Jr. and his kid sister Calamity are raised under the watchful eye of Judge Ben 'Fair and Square" Wiley. Together this dynamic trio keep law and order in small town of Wileyville, Arizona.

The son of a Texas newspaper editor, Jones was a prodigious horseman from infancy, billed at the age of four as the World's Youngest Trick Rider and Trick Roper. At the age of six, he was hired to perform riding and lariat tricks in the rodeo owned by western star Hoot Gibson.
Attachments
buff2.jpg
buff.jpg
buff.jpg (24.64 KiB) Viewed 1120 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Gun Nut
Gun Nut
Posts: 830
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#502 Post by nrobertb » Mon Jun 25, 2018 9:53 pm

A knife by JayGer.
Attachments
JayGer.jpg
JayGer.jpg (39.72 KiB) Viewed 1109 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Gun Nut
Gun Nut
Posts: 830
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#503 Post by nrobertb » Tue Jun 26, 2018 12:40 am

The Virginian had a very long run, 1962-71 and starred James Drury, Doug McClure and Lee J. Cobb, all notable actors.

The Shiloh Ranch in Wyoming Territory of the 1890s is owned in sequence by Judge Garth, the Grainger brothers, and Colonel MacKenzie. It is the setting for a variety of stories, many more based on character and relationships than the usual western.
Attachments
virginian.jpg
virginian.jpg (37.17 KiB) Viewed 1105 times
1_.jpg
1_.jpg (26.72 KiB) Viewed 1105 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Gun Nut
Gun Nut
Posts: 830
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#504 Post by nrobertb » Tue Jun 26, 2018 10:11 am

Yucca House National Monument is located in the Montezuma Valley at the foot of Sleeping Ute Mountain, called "mountain with lots of yucca growing on it" by the Ute people, and inspiration for the name of the national monument. The site is one of many Ancestral Pueblo village sites located in the Montezuma Valley occupied between AD 1100 and 1300 by 13,000 people.

Western Complex was a large pueblo of up to 600 rooms, 100 kivas and a giant, perhaps community, kiva. A spring runs through the complex. A large building about 80 × 100 feet, Upper House, was made of adobe. The ruins are about 12 to 15 feet high, but may have been twice that height.
Lower House is an L-shaped pueblo 200 feet by 180 feet with a plaza, 8 small rooms 7 by 2 feet and a large kiva. Nearby was the ancient pueblo village of Mud Springs at the head of McElmo Canyon.

Like other nearby Ancient Pueblo peoples, the Yucca House pueblo dwellers abandoned their homes, but because a major excavation has not been completed it is not known when, or if there is a relationship between these people and those of nearby pueblo settlements.
Attachments
yucca2.jpg
Yucca.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Gun Nut
Gun Nut
Posts: 830
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#505 Post by nrobertb » Tue Jun 26, 2018 6:01 pm

Ranger Rider was an early western that ran from 1951-53. It starred Jock Mahoney and Dickie Jones who later had their own shows as mentioned earlier. The Range Rider had a reputation for fairness, fighting ability, and accuracy with his guns and was known far and wide, even by the Indians.
Attachments
range2.jpg
range2.jpg (21.05 KiB) Viewed 1091 times
range.jpg
range.jpg (19.36 KiB) Viewed 1091 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Gun Nut
Gun Nut
Posts: 830
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#506 Post by nrobertb » Wed Jun 27, 2018 12:17 am

Iron Horse ran from 1966-68. Ben Calhoun won the half-completed Buffalo Pass, Scalplock and Defiance Line railroad in a poker game and must fight 1880s Indians, bankers and bad guys to complete the line.

The show starred Dale Robertson and Gary Collins, both of whom had lengthy TV careers. Dale was in many westerns and had a regular role on the iconic soap opera Dallas.
Attachments
iron2.jpg
iron2.jpg (16.54 KiB) Viewed 1082 times
iron.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Gun Nut
Gun Nut
Posts: 830
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#507 Post by nrobertb » Wed Jun 27, 2018 6:50 pm

Here's a knife by Jim Behring.
Attachments
jimbehring.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Gun Nut
Gun Nut
Posts: 830
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#508 Post by nrobertb » Wed Jun 27, 2018 11:14 pm

A ceremonial pipe is a particular type of smoking pipe, used by a number of Native American cultures in their sacred ceremonies. Traditionally they are used to offer prayers in a religious ceremony, to make a ceremonial commitment, or to seal a covenant or treaty. The pipe ceremony may be a component of a larger ceremony, or held as a sacred ceremony in and of itself. Indigenous peoples of the Americas who use ceremonial pipes have names for them in each culture's indigenous language. Not all cultures have pipe traditions, and there is no single word for all ceremonial pipes across the hundreds of diverse Native cultures.

Native American ceremonial pipes are usually used in prayer ceremonies. Sometimes they have been called "peace pipes" by Europeans, or others whose cultures do not include these ceremonial objects. However, the smoking of a ceremonial pipe to seal a peace treaty is only one use of a ceremonial smoking pipe, by only some of the nations that utilize them. Historically, ceremonial pipes have been used to mark war and peace, as well as commerce and trade, and social and political decision-making.

In ceremonial usage, the smoke is generally believed to carry prayers to the attention of the Creator or other powerful spirits. Lakota tradition tells that White Buffalo Calf Woman brought the Lakota sacred pipe to the people, and instructed them in its symbolism and ceremonies. Many Native American cultures still practice these ceremonies.

According to oral traditions, and as demonstrated by pre-contact pipes held in museums and tribal and private holdings, some ceremonial pipes are adorned with feathers, fur, animal or human hair, beadwork, quills, carvings or other items having significance for the owner. Other pipes are very simple. Many are not kept by an individual, but are instead held collectively by a medicine society or similar indigenous ceremonial organization.

One material used for ceremonial pipe bowls in the Upper Midwest is red pipestone or catlinite, a fine-grained easily worked stone of a rich red color of the Coteau des Prairies, west of the Big Stone Lake in South Dakota. The pipestone quarries of what today is Minnesota, were neutral ground as people from multiple nations journeyed to the quarry to obtain the sacred pipestone. The Sioux people use long-stemmed pipes in some of their ceremonies. Other peoples, such as the Catawba in the American Southeast, use ceremonial pipes formed as round, footed bowls. A tubular smoke tip projects from each of the four cardinal directions on the bowl.

Ute pipe styles are similar to those of the Plains Indians, with notable differences. Ute pipes are thicker and use shorter pipestems than the plains style and more closely resemble the pipe styles of their Northern neighbors, the Shoshone.

A number of Indigenous North American cultures make and use ceremonial pipes. However, there are also Native American cultures that do not have a ceremonial smoking tradition, but make pipes for social smoking only. The types of materials used vary by community and locality. Some of the known types of pipe stone and pipe materials are:

Clay – The Cherokee and Chickasaw both fashion pipes made from fired clay, however these are only used for social smoking. They use small reed cane pipestems made from river cane. These pipes are made from aged river clay hardened in a hot fire.

Red pipestone – Catlinite is an iron-rich, reddish, soft claystone typically excavated from beds occurring between hard Sioux Quartzite layers below groundwater level, as the stone erodes rapidly when exposed to the weather and outside air. Red pipestone is used primarily by the Plains Tribes, and the Western and Great Basin Tribes. The stone can be found in Minnesota and Utah. Sacred pipestone comes from Pipestone, Minnesota. The quarry is located just north of the town at the Pipestone National Monument. Today only Native Americans are allowed to quarry the pipestone from this quarry. The pipestone from this quarry is considered the softest stone available.

Blue pipestone – is used predominantly by the Plains Tribes for certain types of ceremonial pipes. Deposits of the stone are found in South Dakota.

Salmon alabaster – the Uncompahgre Ute People make ceremonial pipes from salmon alabaster mined in central Colorado.

Green pipestone – A white on green marbled cupric pipestone found in Wyoming and South Dakota is used by the Shoshone, Ute, and Plains Tribes for personal and ceremonial pipes. This stone is also used to carve sacred effigies and religious items.

Black pipestone (South Dakota) – a soft, brittle, white on black marbled pipestone found in South Dakota and used by some of the Plains Tribes for certain types of ceremonial pipes.

Black pipestone (Uinta) – an extremely hard black quartzite slate which has undergone metamorphic compression and is found in the southeastern drainage of the Uinta Mountains in Utah and Colorado. This stone has been used by the Great Basin Tribes for war clubs and pipes that are jet black with a high gloss when polished. Stones which have tumbled down creeks and drainages are always selected, since these stones typically contained no cracks or defects.
Attachments
pipe.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Gun Nut
Gun Nut
Posts: 830
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#509 Post by nrobertb » Thu Jun 28, 2018 12:25 am

Union Pacific ran from 1958-59 featuring Jeff Morrow and Judson Pratt. Not big names but faces you might remember from other shows.

Bart McClelland supervises rail construction for Union Pacific west of Omaha dealing with everything from marauders to land issues. He's aided by surveyor Billy Kincaid and Georgia who runs the mobile Golden Nugget saloon.
Attachments
union2.jpg
union2.jpg (33.23 KiB) Viewed 1066 times
union.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Gun Nut
Gun Nut
Posts: 830
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#510 Post by nrobertb » Thu Jun 28, 2018 10:09 am

Pipestone National Monument is located in southwestern Minnesota, just north of the city of Pipestone, Minnesota. It is located along the highways of U.S. Route 75, Minnesota State Highway 23 and Minnesota State Highway 30.

The catlinite, or "pipestone", has been traditionally used to make ceremonial pipes, vitally important to traditional Plains Indian religious practices. The quarries are sacred to most of the tribe of North America, Dakota, Lakota, and other tribes of Native Americans, and were neutral territory where all Nations could quarry stone for ceremonial pipes. The Sioux tribes may have taken control of the quarries around 1700, but the Minnesota pipestone has been found inside North American burial mounds dating from long before that, and ancient Indian trails leading to the area suggest pipestone may have been quarried there for many centuries.

As the United States grew westward in the 19th century, pipes found their way into white society through trade. To protect their source, the Yankton Sioux secured free and unrestricted access via The Treaty With The Yankton Sioux, which was signed on April 19, 1858.

The land was acquired by the federal government in 1893. In 1928, the Yankton Sioux, then resettled on a reservation 150 miles (240 km) away, sold their claim to the federal government. The National Monument was established by an act of Congress on August 25, 1937, and the establishing legislation restored quarrying rights to the Indians. Today only people of Native American ancestry are allowed to quarry the pipestone.
Attachments
Pipe2.jpg
pipe.jpg

Post Reply

Return to “General Off Topic”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests