Spurs and the Great West

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1849
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

The Suquamish Museum in Washington State opened in 1983 as the Suquamish Museum and Cultural Center, then only the second tribal museum in the state. In 2009 the Suquamish tribe launched a capital campaign to construct a new facility, enlisting Senator Patty Murray and former Washington Secretary of State Ralph Munro to help lead the effort. The new facility opened in 2012 and is triple the size of the original building. Constructed at a cost of $6 million, the 9,000-square-foot purpose-built structure is set in a small botanical garden on the Port Madison Indian Reservation and consists of two galleries, a gift shop, a 50-seat auditorium, and a climate-controlled storage room used to house artifacts not on display. The facility was designed by the Seattle architectural firm Mithun.

In addition to a large repository of photographs documenting tribal life from the 1860s to the present, the museum's collection includes 496 archaeological artifacts recovered from the site of the former Old Man House, a massive 790 ft long longhouse that served as the Suquamish capitol until its destruction in the late nineteenth century. Originally in the custody of the Burke Museum at the University of Washington, the artifacts, which include harpoon points, smoking pipes, and jewelry, were transferred to the Suquamish tribe in 2013. In 2014, the Port of Seattle transferred additional artifacts to the museum, including crockery and glass bottles, discovered during archaeological excavations in the 1970s at the Baba'kwob site, a pre-contact village located in what is now Seattle's Belltown neighborhood. The controversial transfer was contested by the Duwamish, an unrecognized tribe and historic Suquamish rival who claim ownership of the artifacts.

The museum's main gallery features a permanent exhibit titled "Ancient Shores – Changing Tides" that showcases drawings, documents, and historic photographs related to the Suquamish Tribe, contemporary and historic crafts, and interpretative panels and multimedia elements. The centerpiece of this exhibit is a 300-year-old carved canoe that was last used in the 1989 Paddle to Seattle, the first of a now annual series of canoe journeys through the Salish Sea undertaken by tribal members] A second gallery is used to house rotating exhibits from the museum's permanent collection, or items on loan from other museums, including traveling exhibits from the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service. Exhibits have included a display "Native Words, Native Warriors", chronicling the history of Native Americans in the U.S. armed forces.
Attachments
Suquamish_Museum_interior.jpg
User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1849
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

Burney Falls is a waterfall on Burney Creek, within McArthur-Burney Falls Memorial State Park, in Shasta County, California.

The water comes from underground springs above and at the falls, which are 129 feet high, and provides an almost constant flow rate of 379 million litres per day, even during the dry summer months. Burney Creek is a tributary of the Pit River which has its mouth on the Lake Britton reservoir to the north.

The falls are an example of river drainage regulated by stratigraphically-controlled springs, and of a waterfall formed by undercutting of horizontal strata.

The falls were called "the Eighth Wonder of the World" by President Theodore Roosevelt, and were declared a National Natural Landmark in December 1954.
Attachments
The_Burney_Falls.jpg
User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1849
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

The Mukilteo Light is an operational navigation aid located on the east side of Possession Sound at Mukilteo, Snohomish County, Washington. It is owned and operated by the City of Mukilteo as part of Mukilteo Lighthouse Park. The lighthouse is listed on the Washington State Heritage Register and was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1977.

Construction of the lighthouse began in 1905, using the Carl Leick design also seen in the second Ediz Hook lighthouse and Oregon's Cape Arago lighthouse. It was built of wood, while most other lighthouses of the era were constructed using brick and concrete. The lighthouse became operational in 1906, using a revolving Fresnel lens that was manufactured in France in 1852. In 1927, the original lens was replaced with the fixed (non-rotating) fourth-order Fresnel lens which is still in use. The lighthouse and a modern fog signal were automated in 1979, and in 1981, a remote fog sensor was installed.

The two Victorian-style homes on the property were used by Coast Guard personnel until 1996. The entire complex was renovated by the Mukilteo city government in the 1990s for use as a museum.
Attachments
Mukilteo_Lighthouse_WA.jpg
User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1849
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

Great western character actors:
Brad Dexter - American supporting player specializing in tough guys. Of Serbian extraction, he was born in Nevada in 1917. As a young man, he boxed in amateur bouts and had early training in theatre at the Pasadena Playhouse. He joined the Air Corps during World War II and was assigned to the troupe performing the Moss Hart Broadway tribute to the Corps, Winged Victory, acting under his first chosen stage name, Barry Mitchell. He appeared in the film version of the show, and after the war became active in radio drama as well as theatre. John Huston spotted him in a play and cast him as a bad guy in The Asphalt Jungle (1950), under the new sobriquet of Brad Dexter. Throughout the Fifties, he continued to play hard cases of a usually villainous stripe, in both crime dramas and Westerns. His most famous role came as one of title characters in The Magnificent Seven (1960), albeit his fame was considerably eclipsed by most of the other members of that band: Yul Brynner, Steve McQueen, Horst Buchholz, Charles Bronson, Robert Vaughn, and James Coburn. He continued acting into the 1970s, then made a shift into producing.
Attachments
Dexter, Brad.jpg
Dexter, Brad.jpg (15.67 KiB) Viewed 525 times
Dexter, Brad 2.png
User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1849
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

Charlie Sample
Born:1903
Died:
Maker's Mark: "CHAS. SAMPLE MAKER", also used other markings
Charlie Sample was born in Pennsylvania but moved to California where he worked as a silversmith in Bohlin’s shop. Charlie also learned gun engraving before opening his own business where he made bits and spurs as well as buckles and other items. He has continued to produce all types of silver items from coins and medallions and other metal arts items. The photo is of his personal parade spurs.
Attachments
samle's parade spurs.jpeg
User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1849
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

The Transverse Ranges are a group of mountain ranges of southern California, in the Pacific Coast Ranges physiographic region in North America. The Transverse Ranges begin at the southern end of the California Coast Ranges and lie within Santa Barbara, Ventura, Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Riverside and Kern counties. The Peninsular Ranges lie to the south. The name Transverse Ranges is due to their east–west orientation, making them transverse to the general northwest–southeast orientation of most of California's coastal mountains.

The ranges extend from west of Point Conception eastward approximately 500 kilometers into the Mojave and Colorado Desert. The geology and topography of the ranges express three distinct segments that have contrasting elevations, rock types, and vegetation. The western segment extends to the San Gabriel Mountains and San Gabriel fault. The central segment includes mountains that range eastward to the San Andreas fault. The eastern segment extends from the San Andreas fault eastward to the Colorado Desert. The central and eastern segments (near the San Andreas fault) have the highest elevations.

Most of the ranges lie in the California chaparral and woodlands ecoregion. Lower elevations are dominated by chaparral and scrubland, while higher elevations support large conifer forests. Most of the ranges in the system are fault blocks, and were uplifted by tectonic movements late in the Cenozoic Era. West of Tejon Pass, the primary rock types are varied, with a mix of sedimentary, volcanic, and metamorphic rocks, while regions east of the pass are dominated by plutonic granitic and metasedimentary rocks.
Attachments
Transverse.jpg
User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1849
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

Sherman Pass (el. 5575 ft.) is a high mountain pass that crosses the Kettle River Range in the state of Washington. It is the highest pass in the state maintained all year. The pass is located on the Sherman Pass Scenic Byway which traverses the Colville National Forest. The pass is surrounded by the aftermath of the 1988 White Mountain Fire. The pass was named after American Civil War general William Tecumseh Sherman who traveled across the pass in 1883. is a high mountain pass that crosses the Kettle River Range in the state of Washington.
Attachments
Sherman.jpeg
User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1849
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

My sister posted this photo this morning of Estes Park, CO where she lives.
Attachments
IMG-4371.JPG
User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1849
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

David Lawrence Anderson (1862 – June 4, 1918) was a 19th-century American outlaw, better known under the alias Billy Wilson, who rode with Billy the Kid following the Lincoln County War. In his later years, he also served as a law enforcement officer and a U.S. customs inspector.

Born in Trumbull County, Ohio, he moved with his family to southern Texas in the early 1870s. Working as a cowboy during his late teens, he moved to White Oaks, New Mexico in 1880 where he became the owner of a local livery stable. Closing his business the following year, he apparently received counterfeit money from the sale and was eventually indicted for passing the money in Lincoln County.

Forced to go on the run, he joined Billy the Kid and his gang rustling cattle in the local area. From February to May 1880, Anderson stole horses from the Mescalero Apache reservation as well as cattle from ranchers on the Colorado River to whom they sold for $10 a head to White Oaks businessman Thomas Cooper. During the summer they also stole cattle from rancher John Newcomb and sold them along with an additional 20 beef cattle to butcher John Singer in Las Vegas, New Mexico.

On November 29, Anderson and Billy the Kid were traveling in the open country near White Oaks when they were suddenly pursued by a local 8-man posse. Both their horses were killed during the chase however they were both able to escape on foot. Later meeting up with Dave Rudabaugh, the three rode into White Oaks the following day and attempted to gun down deputy sheriff James Redman but were forced to flee after a crowd of 30 or 40 local residents took to the streets. He and the others were tracked to a ranch house 40 miles away by a 12-man posse but they managed to escape. During the shootout, deputy sheriff Jimmy Carlyle was killed and their pursuers burned the hideout in frustration following their escape.

Following the siege at Stinking Springs (near present-day Taiban, New Mexico), he was arrested with the rest of Billy the Kid's gang after surrendering to Pat Garrett and convicted in December 1880. Anderson later escaped from custody in Santa Fe and escaped to Texas where he lived under his birth name David L. Anderson.

Starting a ranch in Uvalde County, Texas, he eventually married and had two children. Thanks in part to the efforts of Pat Garrett and others, Anderson received a presidential pardon from President Grover Cleveland in 1896 and worked as a U.S. customs inspector for a time.

Serving as sheriff of Terrell County, Anderson was eventually ambushed and killed by cowboy Ed Valentine when he responded to a call at a local saloon in Sanderson. Warned that the suspect was armed, the sheriff knew the man and did not consider him a threat. When he entered the saloon the cowboy shot him, killing him instantly. Later the suspect was shot and killed by a deputy when he stepped outside the building. Sheriff Anderson was well liked by the public, and was buried in Brackettville, Texas, after a very emotional funeral at which many Sanderson citizens were in attendance.
Attachments
Billy Wilson.png
Billy Wilson.png (334.15 KiB) Viewed 451 times
User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1849
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

Dominick John O'Malley (April 30, 1867 – March 6, 1943), also known as Dominick White and The N Bar N Kid White, was an American composer of cowboy songs and cowboy poetry, as well as a writer on Western subjects. He is best known for his song "When the Work's All Done This Fall", originally published as the poem "After the Roundup".

O'Malley was born in New York City, the son of a Civil War soldier who stayed in the military after hostilities ended. When D. J. was about two years old, his biological father had surgery to remove a minie ball, dying shortly thereafter. O'Malley's mother, Margaret, quickly married Charles H. White, also a soldier, giving her children his last name. The family spent several years at Army bases in Kansas, Wyoming, and Montana. In 1881, Mr. White disappeared and Margaret and her children moved to Miles City, Montana.

D. J. soon found work as a horse wrangler for the N Bar N ranch near Miles City. From 1881-1896, he worked for the N Bar N in various jobs, including driving cattle from Texas to Montana. He was proud to have been a "rep" representing the N Bar N during roundups. The ranch was sold in 1896, and O'Malley rode for several Eastern Montana outfits including the M Diamond, the Bow and Arrow, the L U Bar, and the Quarter Circle L. He became a special deputy sheriff in Rosebud and was an inspector for the Montana Stock Growers Association, as well as a guard at the Montana State Prison.

In 1911 he moved to Eau Claire, Wisconsin, where he operated a raspberry farm and worked at the Gillette Rubber Company. He died in Eau Claire on March 6, 1943.

In addition to poems, O'Malley wrote many stories about his friends and his work in the West. This work began in the 1880s, and continued for over fifty years. Many of his early pieces were published in the Miles City Stock-Growers Journal, under the pen name N Bar N Kid White. Many were popularized as songs. As they worked their way around the West, they were often altered or added to, and their origins were sometimes lost. When would-be poets later claimed authorship of his work, he could refute them by bringing out the originals with the dates right on the page.

His career as a cowboy poet began in 1889 when he penned "To the Memory of Wiley Collins" about a chuckwagon cook who was killed by lightning. His other poems include "A Cowboy's Soliloquy", "The D Bar 2 Horse Wrangler", and "A Busted Cowboy's Christmas", all well known in the cowboy poetry community. His prose includes episodes such as "The Experiences of the F U F Roundup Crew Caught in the Cloudburst of June 1891" and "Where Custer Fell".

He collected many of his works in a book entitled The N Bar N Kid White, published posthumously in 2000 by the Montana Historical Society, which holds his collected papers.

The Charles Ives song "Charlie Rutlage", published in his 1922 collection 114 Songs, is a setting of a text by O'Malley which at the time of composition was thought to be anonymous.
Attachments
O'Malley2.jpg
O'Malley2.jpg (25.26 KiB) Viewed 436 times
O'Malley.jpg
User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1849
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

Joe Spiller (1955-2019) worked for the United States Forest Service and Rescue in Ruidoso, New Mexico. Then he found his calling of ranching and bit and spur making.

Joe moved to Cranfills Gap, where he started his ranching career, and discovered his 35 year love for bit and spur making. He then moved to Wingate and then Elm Valley where he expanded his business, Spiller Bit and Spurs; which are premiere bit and spurs and are highly sought.

Joe's talent in the bit and spur making landed many praises and articles in the Western Horseman and several other publications; he was named one of the top ten Western Artists in 2000. He also went on to win numerous reining cow horse competitions and cutting championships. He had the honor to drive the Longhorn herd in the Fort Worth Stockyards.
Attachments
Joe Spiller 1.jpg
Joe Spiller 1.jpg (17 KiB) Viewed 420 times
Joe Spiller.jpg
Joe Spiller.jpg (20.64 KiB) Viewed 420 times
User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1849
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

Gold Camp Road follows the former railroad from Colorado Springs (Colorado) to Cripple Creek called the "Short Line". In the 1920s the railroad has been converted to a car toll road, eventually becoming a free public road. In 1988 tunnel #3 collapsed and was never repaired. Because of this, the road is now closed to vehicular traffic and is popular with bikers and hikers.

Start at the large parking lot where Gold Camp Road meets High Drive and Cheyenne Canyon Roadd. At first the road makes a long U-turn gaining elevation. As you cross the creek you will pass the popular Seven Bridges Trail. At the end of this long switchback you will reach the collapsed tunnel. A detour has been built to bypass over it. On the other side of the tunnel you will be standing right over the Silver Cascade Falls running down the large granite wall.

The trail continues to climb at a steady pace as you go south. After about 4.8 miles you will reach tunnel #4, shortly followed by tunnel #5. The trail loops under St.Peters dome and opens up to some great views of the city. Eventually you will reach Old Stage Road which is open to vehicular traffic and continues on to Cripple Creek. You can turn around here and enjoy the sweet ride downhill all the way to the trailhead.
Attachments
Gold Camp.jpg
Gold Camp.jpg (11.28 KiB) Viewed 405 times
Gold Camp 2.jpg
User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1849
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

Battery Point Light is a lighthouse in Crescent City, California, United States. It is registered as a California Historical Landmark, and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as "Crescent City Lighthouse".

Battery Point Light was one of the first lighthouses on the California coast. Rugged mountains and unbridged rivers meant coastal travel was essential for the economic survival of this region. In 1855, Congress appropriated $15,000 for the construction of a lighthouse on the tiny islet, which is connected to Battery Point by an isthmus which is visible, and can be traversed on foot, at low tide. Although not included in the 1852 contract by the United States Lighthouse Service for the first eight west coast lighthouses, the Battery Point Lighthouse was actually lit ten days before the Humboldt Harbor Lighthouse, the last of the original eight to become operational. The fourth-order Fresnel lens was lit in 1856. The lighthouse was automated in 1953, and a modern 14.8-inch (375 mm) lens replaced the fourth-order Fresnel lens. Theophilis Magruder was the station's first keeper; Wayne Piland was its last before automation in 1953. The 1964 Alaska earthquake, the strongest earthquake ever recorded in the northern hemisphere, caused a tsunami. The lighthouse survived. In the following year, the modern beacon that replaced the Fresnel lens in the tower was switched off, and a flashing light at the end of the nearby breakwater served as the harbor's navigational aid. In 1982, the light in the lighthouse tower was lit again, and the Battery Point Lighthouse was listed as a private aid to navigation.

Del Norte Historical Society operates the Battery Point Lighthouse and Museum. The lighthouse is open to the public only when low tide permits access, daily from April through September with tours between 10 AM and 4 PM. October through March, the lighthouse is open for tours on weekends, from 10 AM to 4 PM. In both seasons, visits to the Battery Point Lighthouse and Island are only possible at low tides. It is recommended that visitors research tide times before visiting, as the tide rises very quickly at the point and the land bridge to the lighthouse can disappear rapidly. The museum includes the lighthouse keeper's quarters with period furniture and artifacts left behind since the 1850s, as well as displays of maritime artifacts, photos and historical documents. Tours include a climb into the light tower.

At least two novels have been set at Battery Point Light. Walk Across the Sea, by Susan Fletcher, is a 2001 historical fiction for teens. The Lightkeeper's Daughter, by Colleen Coble, is a 2010 inspirational romance for adults.

Also, the music video for the Tim McGraw song "Not a Moment Too Soon" has scenes of Tim next to the light on the lighthouse's top balcony and scenes of the Battery Point Light from a distance.
Attachments
Battery_Point_Lighthouse.jpg
User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1849
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

Forgotten western movies: Boss of Bullion City is a 1940 American Western film directed by Ray Taylor and starring Johnny Mack Brown.
Maria Montez appears as the female lead. It was the first time she played a leading role and was the only one of her film roles where she speaks some Spanish.

Johnny Mack Brown... Tom Bryant
Fuzzy Knight... Burt Pennypacker
Nell O'Day... Martha Hadley
Maria Montez... Linda Calhoun
Harry Woods... Sheriff Jeff Salters
Melvin Lang... Deputy Fred Wallace
Richard Alexander... Steve Hogan (as Dick Alexander)
Earle Hodgins... Mike Calhoun
Karl Hackett Deputy Tug
George Humbert... Mario - Saloon Owner
The Guadalajara Trio ... Musicians
Attachments
Bullion2.jpg
Bullion.jpg
Bullion.jpg (18.53 KiB) Viewed 364 times
User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1849
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

Chief Joseph Pass el. 7,251 feet is a mountain pass on the continental divide of the Rocky Mountains in the northwestern United States. It separates Lemhi County, Idaho and Beaverhead County, Montana. The pass is in the Bitterroot Mountains and is traversed by Montana State Highway 43. The pass is named after Chief Joseph of the Wallowa band of the Nez Perce tribe who traversed the pass in 1877 during the Nez Perce War.

West of the pass, the highway connects with US-93 at Lost Trail Pass, about .5-mile west of the divide. Between the passes the Montana highway is actually in Idaho, for about 1-mile.

This is the northernmost pass on the continental divide between Idaho and Montana. Less than a mile north, the Continental Divide heads eastward into Montana, following the Ravalli-Beaverhead county line towards Butte. East of Chief Joseph Pass, Highway 43 descends to Wisdom 26 miles away, passing the historic Big Hole National Battlefield, which commemorates that battle of 1877. In early September 1805, the Lewis and Clark Expedition either crossed this pass or the nearby Lost Trail Pass as they traveled westward into the Bitterroot Valley of present-day Ravalli County.

The Lost Trail Powder Mountain ski area is about 1-mile west, at Lost Trail Pass on US-93.
Attachments
Chieff Joseph.jpg
Chief Joseph2.jpg
Post Reply

Return to “General Off Topic”