Spurs and the Great West

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nrobertb
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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I previously mentioned quick draw artist Arvo Ojala and actor Rodd Redwing. Between 1950 and 1959 there was a TV show called "You Asked For It", hosted by Art Baker. I recall there was one episode that featured quick draw artists competing against each other. Redwing and Ojala were both there, along with one or two other who I've forgotten. Unfortunately I can't remember who won the shootout. If any of you saw it, refresh my memory.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by 72 usmc »

To old to fight and to old to run, a Jar head will just shoot and be done with you.

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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Great western character actors: One of those familiar character actors who seems to have been born old, Will Wright specialized in playing crusty old codgers, rich skinflints, crooked small-town politicians and the like. A former newspaper reporter in San Francisco, he switched careers and entered vaudeville, then took to the stage. He ventured from acting to producing, and staged shows on Broadway as well as other cities, eventually making his way to Hollywood. He appeared in over 100 films and did much TV work, including a recurring role on The Andy Griffith Show (1960). Although his hunched-over figure, craggy face and somewhat sour disposition made it seem like he started out his 20+-year career as an old man, he was actually only 68 when he died of cancer in Hollywood in 1962.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Yucca brevifolia is a plant species belonging to the genus Yucca. It is tree-like in habit, which is reflected in its common name, Joshua Tree.

This monocotyledonous tree is native to the arid southwestern United States, specifically California, Arizona, Utah, and Nevada, and to northwestern Mexico. It is confined mostly to the Mojave Desert. It thrives in the open grasslands of Queen Valley and Lost Horse Valley in Joshua Tree National Park. A dense Joshua tree forest also exists on the Cima Dome (Cima, California) in the Mojave National Preserve; northeast of Kingman, Arizona, in Mohave County; as well as along U.S. 93 between the towns of Wickenburg and Wikieup, and designated as the Joshua Tree Parkway of Arizona. The Joshua Tree has barely any leaves, just a few balls on the edges. The Joshua tree can appear in the Mojave desert most of the time. It rarely appears in Death Valley.

The name "Joshua tree" is commonly said to have been given by a group of Mormon settlers crossing the Mojave Desert in the mid-19th century: The tree's role in guiding them through the desert combined with its unique shape reminded them of a biblical story in which Joshua keeps his hands reached out for an extended period of time to guide the Israelites in their conquest of Canaan (Joshua 8:18–26). Further, the shaggy leaves may have provided the appearance of a beard. However, no direct or contemporary attestation of this origin exists, and the name Joshua tree is not recorded until after Mormon contact; moreover, the physical appearance of the Joshua tree more closely resembles a similar story told of Moses.

Joshua trees are fast growers for the desert; new seedlings may grow at an average rate of 3.0 in per year in their first 10 years. The trunk consists of thousands of small fibers and lacks annual growth rings, making determining the tree's age difficult. This tree has a top-heavy branch system, but also what has been described as a "deep and extensive" root system, with roots reaching down to 36 ft. If it survives the rigors of the desert, it can live for hundreds of years; some specimens survive a thousand years. The tallest trees reach about 49 ft. New plants can grow from seed, but in some populations, new stems grow from underground rhizomes that spread out around the parent tree.

Joshua trees usually do not branch until after they bloom (though branching may also occur if the growing tip is destroyed by the yucca-boring weevil), and they do not bloom every year. Like most desert plants, their blooming depends on rainfall at the proper time. They also need a winter freeze before they bloom.

Once they bloom, the flowers are pollinated by the yucca moth (Tegeticula synthetica), which spreads pollen while laying eggs inside the flower. The larvae feed on the seeds, but enough seeds remain to reproduce.

Joshua trees are one of the species predicted to have their range reduced and shifted by climate change. Concern remains that they will be eliminated from Joshua Tree National Park, with ecological research suggesting a high probability that their populations will be reduced by 90% of their current range by the end of the 21st century, thus fundamentally transforming the ecosystem of the park. Also, concern exists about the ability of the species to migrate to favorable climates due to the extinction of the giant Shasta ground sloth (Nothrotheriops shastensis) 13,000 years ago; ground sloth dung has been found to contain Joshua tree leaves, fruits, and seeds, suggesting that the sloths might have been key to the trees' dispersal.

Cahuilla Native Americans, who have lived in the Southwestern United States for generations, identify this plant as a valuable resource. Their ancestors used the leaves of Y. brevifolia to weave sandals and baskets, in addition to harvesting the seeds and flower buds for meals. Native Americans also used the reddish roots to make dye.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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The Glass Mountains (also known as Gloss Mountains or Gloss Hills) are not actually mountains, but a series of mesas and buttes that are part of the Blaine Escarpment that extends from the Permian red beds of northwestern Oklahoma in Major County. The Glass Mountains rise 150 feet to 200 feet above the surface of the plains, and the highest elevation in the formation is about 1,600 feet above sea level. The Glass Mountains stretch west along U.S. Route 412 from Orienta south of the Cimarron River. The name comes from the sparkling selenite crystals on the slopes and tops of the mesas.

During the Quaternary Period, the most recent one million years, Pleistocene terraces were laid down along the major rivers in this area of the United States, with Holocene alluvium that are at least 100 feet thick and contain sand, gravel, silt, clay and volcanic ash.

The next layer was formed during the Permian Period, which occurred 230 to 270 million years ago. This consists of red sandstone and shale which is 1,000 feet) to 4,500 feet thick, with gypsum on the outcroppings. The Permian "redbeds" are subdivided into the Cimarronian Series (2850 feet) at the base, overlain by the Custerian Series (400 feet, top eroded). Deposits of Flowerpot shale (180 feet to 430 feet that consists mainly of red-brown illitic-chloritic shale, are found at this area.

The first American explorers referred to this feature as the "Shining Mountains," when they saw the formation in 1821. The name Glass Mountains has been attributed to an explorer named Thomas James. James visited this area during 1821, while on a trading expedition along the Cimarron River. In 1875, a transcription error by a mapmaker resulted in the name Gloss Mountains which is still a somewhat common name for the mountains.

The state of Oklahoma operates the 640 acres Glass (Gloss) Mountain State Park, 6 miles west of Orienta on a mesa along Highway 412. The park allows climbers to hike to the top of the mesa via a path and stairs. Picnic tables and an informational kiosk have been installed, and a pond known as Rattlesnake Lake is nearby.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Forest Armstrong
Born:1893
Died:1966
Maker's Mark:
"F.A." or "A", sometimes a date is also stamped
Forest ran a shop by himself, he never married or had any children. His main work was repairing broken items so there aren’t a lot of his bits out there. His style is most notable for his technique of overlaying silver and pinning it to the cheekpiece instead of soldering. His engraving style is quite simple generally being much more structured and geometric than the foliated patterns used by Garcia disciples. His bits sometimes are marked with F.A. or A on the mouthpiece and sometimes a date is included.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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The Yakama Indian Reservation is a Native American reservation in Washington state of the federally recognized tribe known as the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation. The tribe is made up of Klikitat, Palus, Wallawalla, Wanapam, Wenatchi, Wishram, and Yakama peoples..

The reservation is located on the east side of the Cascade Mountains in southern Washington state. The eastern portion of Mount Adams lies within this territory. According to the United States Census Bureau, the reservation covers 2,185.94 square miles and the population in 2000 was 31,799. It lies primarily in Yakima and the northern edge of Klickitat counties. The largest city on the reservation is Toppenish.

About 80% of the reservation's land is held in trust by the federal government for the benefit of the tribe and tribal members. The remaining 20% of the reservation's land is privately owned.

Some 410,000 acres of the reservation are shrub-steppe rangeland; as of 2014, about 15,000 wild horses roamed these lands—an unsustainable population, many times what the land can support.

The reservation was created in 1855 by a treaty signed by Washington Territory Gov. Isaac Stevens and representatives of the Yakama tribe. Several Native leaders believed that those representatives did not have the authority to cede communal land and had not properly gained consensus from the full council or tribe. A dispute over the treaty conditions led to the Yakima War (1855–1858), which the Yakama and allied tribes waged against the United States.

In 1994, the Yakima Tribal Council unanimously voted to change the spelling of the tribe's name from Yakima to Yakama, matching the spelling of the 1855 treaty. The pronunciation remained the same.

The Yakama reservation was affected by the Cougar Creek fire, one of the 2015 Washington wildfires. About 80% of the Cougar Creek fire burned on reservation land. The Yakama responded by salvage logging.

Roughly 10,000 people were enrolled members of the Yakama Nation in 2009. The required blood quantum for tribal membership is ​1⁄4.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Batista Pini
Born:1886
Died:1951
Maker's Mark:
"BP" or "BV PINI"
Little in known about Batista Pini’s life but it is known that he was born in Switzerland and that in the early to mid 1900s he was working on California ranches, his work is typical of the California style with bits and spurs featuring inlaid silver with fine engraving.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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The Nodaway River is a 65.7-mile-long river in southwest Iowa and northwest Missouri.

The river's name (as "Nodawa") first appears in the journal of Lewis and Clark, who camped at the mouth of the river on July 8, 1804. but who provide no derivation of the name. The name is an Otoe-Missouria term meaning "jump over water".

Lewis and Clark camped at the river's mouth on Nodaway Island on July 8, 1804, by Nodaway, Missouri, on the border of Holt County, Missouri and Andrew County, Missouri and took note of the river.

Lewis and Clark liked the spot enough that they recommended it for the winter headquarters of Astor Expedition of 1810–12 that discovered the South Pass in Wyoming through which hundreds of settlers on the Oregon Trail, California Trail, Mormon Trail were to pass.

The river is navigable only by shallow fishing and row boats although steam ships navigated just inside its mouth. The river was the primary route for white settlers including Amos Graham and Isaac Hogan following the Platte Purchase of 1836 which opened northwest Missouri for settlement. Nodaway County, which derives its name from the river, was by far the biggest county in the purchase and the fourth largest in the state of Missouri.

Major tributaries in the Nodaway River basin are Seven Mile Creek, West Nodaway River, East Nodaway River, Middle Nodaway River, Clear Creek, Mill Creek, Elkhorn Creek, and Arapahoe Creek. The biggest town on the river is Clarinda, Iowa.

Elevations in the Nodaway system range from just under 1,400 feet above sea level at the source of the Middle Nodaway, to 950 feet at the beginning of the main stem, to 800 feet at its mouth on the Missouri River in Nodaway, Missouri in Andrew County, Missouri.

The Nodaway River is a sixth order river with a basin area of 1,820 square miles.

The Nodaway River basin is prone to extensive flooding and can contribute as much as 20% of the flood crest of the Missouri River near its mouth.

At Graham, Missouri its normal flow is 1,011 cubic feet per second. But during the Great Flood of 1993 the river was flowing 78,300 ft³/s at Graham.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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George Lawrence Company
Born:1857
Died:1950s
Maker's Mark:
The George Lawrence Company was a saddlery and sold gear throughout the northwest starting in the 1860s. It was originally started by Samuel Sherlock, but it was bought by George Lawrence (who was Sherlock’s brother in law). The Company supplied the US Cavalry in the Northwest and distributed goods through a network of trading posts and mercantile stores, as well as through a catalog. It is unknown if any famous makers produced spurs for the company, or who produced them at all for that matter. The company stamped its marks near the button of spurs.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Star garnet is an unusual form of garnet and is the state gemstone of Idaho. The garnet varieties that occasionally exhibit asterism are almandine and a mixture of almandine and pyrope garnet. Star garnet gemstones are usually opaque and deep brownish-red or reddish-black. Like all star gems, the star effect is caused by inclusions of rutile.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Forgotten western movies: Buck Benny Rides Again is a 1940 Paramount Pictures feature film starring Jack Benny and Ellen Drew. The film featured regulars from Benny's radio show including Eddie 'Rochester' Anderson, Andy Devine, Phil Harris, and Dennis Day. It also included a debut film appearance for radio star Lillian Cornell. The film was directed and produced by Mark Sandrich and produced by Joseph L. Mankiewicz.

Jack Benny resists the entreaties of bandleader Phil Harris to journey to Nevada, where Phil's sweetheart, Brenda Tracy, is waiting for her divorce, until Jack meets Joan Cameron, one of a trio of singing sisters. Believing that the only real men hail from the West, Joan spurns Jack's advances even though her sisters encourage the courtship.

Realizing that Jack's infatuation presents the bait to lure him West, Phil tells Joan that Jack owns a ranch in Nevada, and when Fred Allen's press agent broadcasts the story, all of New York starts talking about Jack's ranch. To save face, Jack, determined to prove that he is a true son of the West, travels to Nevada. After Joan and her sisters arrive to perform at a nearby plush dude ranch, Jack poses as the owner of Andy Devine's spread. To impress Joan, Jack pays Andy's ranch hands to stage fights with him, but his plot backfires when he mistakes two real outlaws for Andy's patsies.

Meanwhile, Joan overhears Rochester, Jack's butler, discussing Jack's ruse, and hires the outlaws to hold Jack up, but when she learns that Fred Allen's press agent is in town, she warns Jack. When the outlaws hold up the hotel, Jack, believing that the robbery is a fake, rushes to the rescue and, with the help of his pet bear Carmichael, captures the bandits and saves Joan.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Here is a pair of gal leg spurs which are unusual in that they have boots and spurs rather than shoes.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Tom Hildreth
Born:1856
Died:1908
Maker's Mark:
"TL HILDRETH SAC" or "L HILDRETH"
Tom Hildreth was born on his family’s ranch in California and they moved to San Jose when he was about 10 years old. Tom apprenticed in San Jose as a blacksmith and learned the trade of bit and spur making. He worked producing bits and spurs for saddlery companies and possibly published his own catalog as well. He spent most of his life working in Sacramento, but moved to San Francisco late in his life. Hildreth did mostly inlay work on bits and spurs. He used several different marks over his life which are found by the button on spurs and inside the cheek on bits.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Great western character actors: She started as a model, and in 1955 became an actress. She acted under her birth name, Marjorie Hellen, until 1959. Afterwards she was known as Leslie Parrish. She appeared in more than 100 TV shows. She is known as one of the first women producers. She's always had a passion for music. She was involved in social causes such as the Vietnam war. She met the airplane pilot/writer Richard D. Bach during the making of Jonathan Livingston Seagull (1973), and they married in 1977. They divorced in 1997.
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