Spurs and the Great West

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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Black Elk Peak (formerly Harney Peak) is the highest natural point in South Dakota, United States. It lies in the Black Elk Wilderness area, in southern Pennington County, in the Black Hills National Forest. The peak lies 3.7 mi west-southwest of Mount Rushmore. At 7,242 feet it has been described by the Board on Geographical Names as the highest summit in the United States east of the Rocky Mountains. Though part of the North American Cordillera, it is generally considered to be geologically separate from the Rocky Mountains. Lost Mine peak in the Chisos mountains of Texas, at an elevation of 7,535 feet, is the furthest east peak within the continental United States above 7,000 feet.

The U.S. Board on Geographic Names, which has jurisdiction in federal lands, officially changed the mountain's name from "Harney Peak" to "Black Elk Peak" on August 11, 2016, honoring Black Elk, the noted Lakota Sioux medicine man for whom the Wilderness Area is named.

The mountain was named Harney Peak in 1855 by American Lieutenant Gouverneur K. Warren in honor of US General William S. Harney, his commander in a regional military expedition. In punitive retaliation for other Sioux raids, in September 1855 Harney's forces killed Brulé Sioux warriors, women and children in what Americans called the Battle of Blue Water Creek in Garden County, Nebraska.

The first Americans believed to have reached the summit were a party led by General George Armstrong Custer in 1874, during the Black Hills expedition. The federal government took back the Black Hills and another strip of land in a new treaty in 1877. More than a decade later, it broke up the Great Sioux Reservation in 1889 into five smaller reservations, the same year that North Dakota and South Dakota were admitted as states to the Union. The government made some 9 million acres of former Lakota land available for purchase for ranching and homesteading. Most American settlement in West River did not start until the early 20th century. The area attracted many European immigrants as well as migrants from the East.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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An all around saddle from Colorado Saddlery.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Granite Peak, at an elevation of 12,807 feet above sea level, is the highest natural point in the U.S. state of Montana, and is the tenth highest state high point in the nation. It lies within the Absaroka-Beartooth Wilderness, in Park County very near the borders of Stillwater County and Carbon County. Granite Peak is 10 miles north of the Wyoming border, 45 miles southwest of Columbus, Montana.

Granite Peak is the second most difficult state highpoint after Denali in Alaska, due to technical climbing, poor weather, and route finding. Granite Peak's first ascent was made by Elers Koch, James C. Whitham and R.T. Ferguson on August 29, 1923 after several failed attempts by others. It was the last of the state highpoints to be climbed. Today, climbers typically spend two or three days ascending the peak, stopping over on the Froze-to-Death Plateau, although some climbers choose to ascend the peak in a single day. Another route that has gained popularity in recent years is the Southwest Couloir route, a non-technical route from the south starting near Cooke City; climbers generally take two days to complete it.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Here is an exhibition Bowie knife by Wade Chastain.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Gannett Peak is the highest mountain peak in the U.S. state of Wyoming at 13,810 feet. It lies in the Wind River Range within the Bridger Wilderness of the Bridger-Teton National Forest. Straddling the Continental Divide along the boundary between Fremont and Sublette counties, it is the highest ground for 290 miles in any direction.

Geographically, Gannett Peak is the ape of the entire Central Rockies, the largely continuous chain of mountains occupying the states of Wyoming, Idaho and Montana. Named in 1906 for American geographer Henry Gannett, the peak is also the high point of the Wind River Range.

Gannett is the highest peak within what is better known as the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem and is the highest peak in the Rocky Mountains outside of Colorado. The 896-acre Gannett Glacier, which is likely the largest single glacier in the American portion of the Rocky Mountains, extends across the northern slopes of the mountain. Minor Glacier is situated in the western cirque of the peak while Dinwoody and Gooseneck Glaciers can be found on the southeast side of the mountain.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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More spurs.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Borah Peak (also known as Mount Borah or Beauty Peak) is the highest mountain in the U.S. state of Idaho and one of the most prominent peaks in the contiguous states. It is located in the central section of the Lost River Range, within the Challis National Forest in eastern Custer County.

The mountain was nameless until it was discovered to be higher than Hyndman Peak, previously regarded as the state's highest point. In February 1934, the U.S. Geological Survey named it for William Borah, the prominent senior U.S. Senator from Idaho, who had served for nearly 27 years at the time and was dean of the Senate. An outspoken isolationist, the "Lion of Idaho" ran for president two years later in 1936, but did not win the Republican nomination, and died in office in 1940.

The 1983 Borah Peak earthquake occurred on Friday, October 28, at 8:06:09 MDT in the Lost River Range at Borah Peak in central Idaho, United States, measuring 6.9 on the moment magnitude scale. Mount Borah rose about 1 foot (30 and the Lost River Valley in that vicinity dropped about 8 feet. The peak was scarred on the western side, and the mark is still visible. Two children in Challis were the only fatalities of the quake, struck by falling masonry while walking to elementary school.

The normal route involves ascending 5,262 vertical feet from the trailhead to the summit in just over 3.5 miles. This route on the southwest ridge, the most popular route, is a strenuous hike for the most part until one reaches a Class 4 arête just before the main summit crest. This point is known as Chickenout Ridge as many people will abort the attempt once they see the hazards up close. In the cooler seasons this crossing usually involves a traverse over snow, with steeply slanting slopes on either side. An ice axe, and the ability to use it, is recommended for this section when icy.

Borah Peak's north face is one of Idaho's only year-round snow climbs and provides a much greater challenge than the normal route. The face features a number of grade II class 5 routes on mixed terrain.

Three climbers are known to have died on Borah Peak. Two climbers ascending the northwest ridge in 1977 were killed in an avalanche in November. Ten years later in 1987, another lost his life on a glissade during descent in June.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Mount Rainier, also known as Tahoma or Tacoma, is a large active stratovolcano in Cascadia located 59 miles south-southeast of Seattle, in Mount Rainier National Park. With a summit elevation of 14,411 it is the highest mountain in the U.S. state of Washington, and of the Cascade Range of the Pacific Northwest, the most topographically prominent mountain in the contiguous United States, and the tallest in the Cascade Volcanic Arc.

Mt. Rainier is considered one of the most dangerous volcanoes in the world, and it is on the Decade Volcano list. Because of its large amount of glacial ice, Mt. Rainier could produce massive lahars that could threaten the entire Puyallup River valley. "About 80,000 people and their homes are at risk in Mount Rainier’s hazard zones."


Mount Rainier was first known by the local Salishan speakers as Talol, Tacoma, or Tahoma. One hypothesis of the word origin is 'mother of waters' in the Lushootseed language spoken by the Puyallup people. Another hypothesis is that Tacoma means "larger than Mount Baker" .

The current name was given by George Vancouver, who named it in honor of his friend, Rear Admiral Peter Rainier. The map of the Lewis and Clark expedition of 1804–1806 refers to it as Mt. Regniere.

Although Rainier had been considered the official name of the mountain, Theodore Winthrop, in his posthumously published 1862 travel book The Canoe and the Saddle, referred to the mountain as Tacoma and for a time, both names were used interchangeably, although Mt. Tacoma was preferred in the nearby city of Tacoma.

In 1890, the United States Board on Geographic Names declared that the mountain would be known as Rainier. Following this in 1897, the Pacific Forest Reserve became the Mount Rainier Forest Reserve, and the national park was established three years later. Despite this, there was still a movement to change the mountain's name to Tacoma and Congress was still considering a resolution to change the name as late as 1924.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Great western character actors: Mariette Hartley began her career as a 13-year-old in the White Barn Theatre in Norwalk, Connecticut. In her teens as a stage actress, she was coached and mentored by Eva Le Gallienne. She graduated from Westport's Staples High School in 1957, where she was an active member of the school's theater group, Staples Players. Hartley also worked at the American Shakespeare Festival.

Her film career began with an uncredited cameo appearance in From Hell to Texas (1958), a western with Dennis Hopper. In the early 1960s, she moved to Los Angeles and joined the UCLA Theater Group.

Hartley's first credited film appearance was alongside Randolph Scott and Joel McCrea in the 1962 Sam Peckinpah western Ride the High Country; the role earned her a BAFTA nomination. She continued to appear in film during the 1960s, including the lead role in the adventure Drums of Africa (1963), and prominent supporting roles in Alfred Hitchcock's psychological thriller Marnie (1964) — alongside Tippi Hedren and Sean Connery — and the John Sturges drama Marooned (1969). She also featured in the 1964 Twilight Zone episode "The Long Morrow".

Hartley also guest starred in numerous TV series during the decade, with appearances in Gunsmoke, The Travels of Jaimie McPheeters (starring a young Kurt Russell), the syndicated Death Valley Days (then hosted by Ronald Reagan), Judd, for the Defense and Star Trek among others. In 1965, she had a significant role as Dr. Claire Morton in 32 episodes of Peyton Place.

Hartley continued to feature in numerous film and TV roles during the 1970s, including appearances in two Westerns alongside Lee Van Cleef, Barquero (1970) and The Magnificent Seven Ride (1972), as well as landing guest roles in episodes of series including McCloud, Little House on the Prairie, Police Woman and Columbo — starring in two editions of the latter alongside Peter Falk; Publish or Perish co-starring Jack Cassidy (1974) and Try and Catch Me with Ruth Gordon (1977). Hartley portrays similar characters as a publisher's assistant in both episodes.

In 1977, Hartley appeared in the TV movie The Last Hurrah, a political drama film based on the Edwin O'Connor novel of the same name; the role earned Hartley her first Emmy Award nomination.

Her role as psychologist Dr. Carolyn Fields in "Married", a 1978 episode of the TV series The Incredible Hulk — in which she marries Bill Bixby's character, the alter ego of the Hulk — won Hartley the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series. She would be nominated for the same award for her performance in an episode of The Rockford Files the following year.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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A pair of E. Garcia spurs.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Great western character actors: Rex Holman was born on December 11, 1935 in Oklahoma, USA as Rexford George Holman. He is an actor, known for Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (1989), Star Trek: The Original Series (1966) and Kung Fu (1972).

Although born in Denver, CO, he lived a good number of years of his life in Tulsa, OK.
In Quentin Tarantino's Once Upon a Time... in Hollywood (2019), he's shown via archived footage in his role as a bad guy on the television series The F.B.I. (1965) with Leonardo DiCaprio's character, actor Rick Dalton, who is superimposed into the episode.
Probably best remembered for playing hotheaded young gunslingers--who usually wound up shot full of holes before the end credits--in many TV westerns in the '50s and '60s.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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This is an old California style saddle.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Barbed wire, also known as barb wire, occasionally corrupted as bobbed wire or bob wire, is a type of steel fencing wire constructed with sharp edges or points arranged at intervals along the strands. It is used to construct inexpensive fences and is used atop walls surrounding secured property. It is also a major feature of the fortifications in trench warfare (as a wire obstacle).

A person or animal trying to pass through or over barbed wire will suffer discomfort and possibly injury (this is especially true if the fence is also electric). Barbed wire fencing requires only fence posts, wire, and fixing devices such as staples. It is simple to construct and quick to erect, even by an unskilled person.

The first patent in the United States for barbed wire was issued in 1867 to Lucien B. Smith of Kent, Ohio, who is regarded as the inventor. Joseph F. Glidden of DeKalb, Illinois, received a patent for the modern invention in 1874 after he made his own modifications to previous versions.

Barbed wire was the first wire technology capable of restraining cattle. Wire fences were cheaper and easier to erect than their alternatives. (One such alternative was Osage orange, a thorny bush which was time-consuming to transplant and grow. The Osage orange later became a supplier of the wood used in making barb wire fence posts.) When wire fences became widely available in the United States in the late 19th century, they made it affordable to fence much larger areas than before. They made intensive animal husbandry practical on a much larger scale.

An example of the costs of fencing with lumber immediately prior to the invention of barbed wire can be found with the first farmers in the Fresno, California area, who spent nearly $4,000 (equivalent to $85,000 in 2019) to have wood for fencing delivered and erected to protect 2,500 acres of wheat crop from free-ranging livestock in 1872.

As a kid in Illinois in the 1950's I remember seeing extensive hedge rows of Osage Orange used for fencing. The farmers eventually ripped them all out so they could plant crops right up to the edges of the fields. My home town is DeKalb, where the aforementioned Glidden lived. He and two other residents, Ellwood and Haish, all made fortunes on barbed wire and built large mansions. The Elwood Estate is the only one still standing and is open to the public as a historic house,
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Barbed wire has three common twist types: single twist barbed wire, double twist barbed wire and traditional twist barbed wire. Barbed wire includes line wire and barbed wire. In general, the wire diameter of line wire is larger than that of barbed wire.

There were some 800 unique barbed-wire patents, and many more unpatented variations for a total of perhaps 2,000 types of barbed wire. Some feature wire barbs attached to single or double strands.

There was fierce competition among the various wire manufacturers. In the 1990's we took miles of wire off the old farms at Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, and in that relatively small farming district we found about twenty different types of barbed wire.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Ellen Liddy Watson (July 2, 1860 – July 20, 1889) was a pioneer of Wyoming who became known as Cattle Kate, an outlaw of the Old West, although the characterization is a dubious one, as subsequent research has tended to see her as a much maligned victim of a self styled land baron. Watson had acquired homestead rights on land with water resources vital to the wealthiest rancher in the county, Albert Bothwell, when she was accused by him of cattle rustling. She was abducted from her home and lynched along with her husband by Bothwell and some other ranchers he had incited against her. The bodies were left hanging in for 2 days, and the reputation that attached to her until recently was quickly established by newspaper publicity. Accounts of Watson as a rustler are now regarded as highly biased. Her life has become an Old West legend, and inspired a number of television and film accounts.
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