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Spurs and the Great West

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nrobertb
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1246 Post by nrobertb » Tue Aug 13, 2019 9:05 am

Two pairs of spurs by Oscar Crockett.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1247 Post by nrobertb » Tue Aug 13, 2019 9:42 pm

Helen Bia started weaving when she was 15 years old and was taught to weave by her mom, Mary Y Bia and her older sister Lucy B Begay. Helen has won many awards from the Gallup All Indian Inter-Tribal Ceremonial. Her weavings have also been in exhibitions at the Desert Caballeros Western Museum.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1248 Post by nrobertb » Wed Aug 14, 2019 11:08 pm

Great western character actors: Philadelphia native Malcolm Atterbury was born into a wealthy family - his father was president of the Pennsylvania Railroad - but he himself had no desire to go into the family business. He had always wanted to be an actor, and to that end got himself a job managing a radio station. From there he went into vaudeville, then into stage work in both musicals and dramas, gaining a reputation as a solid and reliable stage actor. He made his film debut in Dragnet (1954). Although he soon became a busy supporting actor in films, he still kept his hand in the theater world; he owned two theaters in upstate New York. A versatile actor, he could play anything from a priest to a senator to a hotel clerk to a gunfighter to a cranky, cantankerous old codger. His last film was Emperor of the North (1973). He died in Beverly Hills of old age in 1992.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1249 Post by nrobertb » Thu Aug 15, 2019 2:47 pm

Split Rock Lighthouse State Park is a state park of Minnesota on the North Shore of Lake Superior. It is best known for the picturesque Split Rock Lighthouse, one of the most photographed lighthouses in the United States. Built by the United States Lighthouse Service in 1910, the lighthouse and some adjacent buildings have been restored and the Minnesota Historical Society operates them as a museum. The 2,200-acre state park offers a unique cart-in campground and scenic trails for hiking, cross-country skiing, and bicycling.

Split Rock Lighthouse State Park encompasses about 4 miles of rocky shoreline on Lake Superior with several prominent headlands. Named features of the shore, from southwest to northeast, are the mouth of the Split Rock River, Split Rock Point, Crazy Bay, Corundum Point, the mouth of Split Rock Creek, Day Hill, Little Two Harbors which refers to the city of Two Harbors farther down the shore. There are two shallow sea caves at the base of Stony Point.

The east and west branches of the Split Rock River, not to be confused with Split Rock Creek, join in the park. There are ten waterfalls on the river, although because they can only be reached by a moderate hike on the Superior Hiking Trail and are not marked on park maps, they are lightly visited.

Beginning 2 million years ago a series of glacial periods repeatedly covered the region with ice, scouring the bedrock and scooping out a great basin. The glaciers, and later meltwater, wore away less resistant rock, leaving behind hills and ridges of the harder rocks. At the end of the last glacial period the basin filled with meltwater. The water level fluctuated significantly over time due to blockages of the outlet and post-glacial rebound. The high-water Glacial Lake Duluth deposited clay sediments inland, while later, lower precursors of Lake Superior eroded bluffs and beach terraces.

The park was originally forested with red and white pine. However, these were heavily logged at the beginning of the 20th century, and wildfires sweeping through the cutover land killed many of the remaining saplings and seedlings. Today the vegetation is primarily birch with some spruce, fir, and ash trees.

Mammals found in the park include white-tailed deer, moose, black bears, raccoons, snowshoe hares, red foxes, bobcats, and Canadian lynxes. A colony of beavers lives on the Split Rock River. Birds include herring gulls, common loons, and a variety of songbirds. Peregrine falcons nest on the lakeside cliffs.[3]

Several vestiges of early 20th-century industry are visible in the park. The first white settlement in the Split Rock area was Little Two Harbors, a commercial fishing village populated largely by Norwegian immigrants. The men of the village fished for trout, whitefish, and herring from 16–18 foot skiffs in the fall and winter. Little Two Harbors was inhabited until 1925, although in later years only 4 or 5 residents lived there year-round. Cement foundations of houses and fish processing buildings remain.

A logging camp known as Splitrock existed at the mouth of the Split Rock River from 1899 to 1906. Pilings from their dam and wharf are still visible jutting from the water. The Merrill Logging Trail follows the route of their 10-mile (16 km) rail line. In 1901 a prospector from Duluth misidentified the outcrops of anorthosite as corundum, an extremely hard mineral valuable as an industrial abrasive. Three years later the North Shore Abrasives Company set up mining operations on Corundum Point, but abandoned the site in 1908 when their product was found to be inadequate. Their crushing house burned down in a forest fire in 1910 but its concrete footings remain.

Three violent storms struck the Great Lakes in November 1905, killing 116 sailors. One, the Mataafa Storm of November 28, damaged nearly 30 ships on Lake Superior. Two ships were wrecked against the future park's shore, the steel steamboat William Edenborn and a barge it was towing, the Madeira. The Edenborn was beached far ashore at the mouth of the Split Rock River and later salvaged, but one of the 25 crewmembers was killed. The Madeira with 10 men aboard drifted northeast until violent waves began smashing her against the cliffs of Gold Rock Point. Crewman Fred Benson managed to leap onto the rocks and scale the cliff in the midst of the snowstorm. The first mate was swept overboard and drowned, but Benson was able to lower a rope and pull the other 8 crew to safety. The Madeira sank in pieces at the foot of Gold Rock while the crewmen, suffering from exposure and frostbite, found shelter with local fishermen and loggers. Both crews were picked up two days later by the tugboat Edna G.

The shipping companies that had sustained losses in the storms lobbied the federal government for an expanded system of navigational aids on the Great Lakes. A signal in that area was at the top of the industry's list of demands. The site ultimately selected for the lighthouse and fog signal was 2.5 miles northeast of the Split Rock River, on Stony Point. There were no roads yet up the North Shore, so all construction materials were brought in by barge and hoisted up the cliff with a derrick and a steam-powered hoist. By midsummer 1910 work was complete on the lighthouse, foghorn building, and three houses for the lighthouse keepers.

The derrick remained the only way to bring supplies up the cliff until the lighthouse staff built a tramway in 1915-16.The station finally became accessible by a road, now Minnesota State Highway 61, completed in 1929. Five years later a crew from the Civilian Conservation Corps built a new access road and lighthouse tenders were provided with a truck to bring in supplies by land, so the tramway was dismantled.

The picturesque lighthouse, perched on a 130-foot cliff overlooking the world's largest lake, began attracting small numbers of visitors within weeks of its opening. However the completion of Highway 61 opened the floodgates to tourism. In 1938 it was estimated that 100,000 visitors stopped by, five times more than any other federally operated lighthouse. Some of the lighthouse keepers' children opened a souvenir stand just outside the station entrance in 1941. Both the U.S. Lighthouse Service and the U.S. Coast Guard which absorbed it in 1939 were obliged to add seasonal staff to help conduct tours.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1250 Post by nrobertb » Fri Aug 16, 2019 2:55 pm

Master Weaver: Irene Bia
Irene started weaving when she was 13 years old and was taught to weave by her mother and paternal grandmother. Helen has won many awards from the Gallup All Indian Inter-Tribal Ceremonial. Her weavings have also been in exhibitions at the Desert Caballeros Western Museum.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1251 Post by nrobertb » Sat Aug 17, 2019 10:36 am

Here are a pair of spurs by Duane Graham of Azrec, NM.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1252 Post by nrobertb » Sun Aug 18, 2019 10:29 am

Great western character actors: Olan Soule was born in La Harpe, Illinois and began his acting career in 1926 on radio, performing for 11 years in the daytime soap opera "Bachelor's Children". A versatile actor with a "chameleon-like" voice, Soule played the male lead characters in plays presented on the evening radio show "First Nighter" for 9 years beginning in 1943. Listeners of the show who met him were often surprised, since his slight 135 pound body didn't seem to match the voices he gave to his characters. The First Nighter troupe moved to Hollywood, where Soule stayed and eventually worked his way into television.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1253 Post by nrobertb » Mon Aug 19, 2019 4:54 pm

Cara Yazzie Gorman has won numerous awards at the Gallup All Indian Inter-Tribal Ceremonial and has hand many of her weavings exhibited at the Desert Caballeros Western Museum in Wickenburg, Arizona. This rug is a Two Grey Hills pattern.

Cara was taught to weave by her Grandma, Nabaglenabah Tsosie – down in Canyon de Chelly by Spider Rock area.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1254 Post by nrobertb » Tue Aug 20, 2019 12:05 pm

Guernsey State Park in Wyoming had its beginnings with construction of the Guernsey Dam, which was completed in 1927. Beginning in 1934, workers with the Civilian Conservation Corps created recreational facilities on the land surrounding the dam's reservoir. Their labors came to an end in 1939. Park management fell to the state of Wyoming in 1957.

Lake Guernsey State Park (also known as Guernsey State Park Historic District, Lake Guernsey Park, Guernsey Lake Park, or Guernsey State Park) was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1997 for its Civilian Conservation Corps buildings and structures. The historic district contains 60 contributing resources: 14 buildings, 3 sites, and 43 structures, as well as 46 non-contributing resources.

The Guernsey State Park Museum offers information about the CCC and the natural and cultural history of the area. The park contains a separate National Historic Landmark, the Oregon Trail Ruts. Register Cliff, another feature of the Oregon Trail listed on the National Register of Historic Places, is located two miles southeast of the park.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1255 Post by nrobertb » Wed Aug 21, 2019 7:49 pm

The Boise River is a 102-mile-long tributary of the Snake River in the northwestern United States. It drains a rugged portion of the Sawtooth Range in southwestern Idaho northeast of Boise, as well as part of the western Snake River Plain. The watershed encompasses approximately 4,100 square miles of highly diverse habitats, including alpine canyons, forest, rangeland, agricultural lands, and urban areas.

The Boise River rises in three separate forks in the Sawtooth Range at elevations exceeding 10,000 feet, and is formed by the confluence of its North and Middle forks. The North Fork, 50 miles long, rises in the Sawtooth Wilderness Area, along the Boise–Elmore county line, 60 miles northeast of Boise. It flows generally southwest through the remote mountains in the Boise National Forest. The Middle Fork, approximately 52 miles in length, rises within 12 miles of the North Fork in the southern Sawtooth Wilderness Area in northeastern Elmore County. It flows west-southwest near the town of Atlanta, joining the North Fork to form the Boise River, approximately 15 miles southeast of Idaho City. The main stream flows southwest into Arrowrock Reservoir joining the South Fork from the Anderson Ranch Dam.

The 101-mile-long South Fork rises in northern Camas County in the Smoky Mountains and Soldier Mountains of the Sawtooth National Forest north of Fairfield, 65 miles east of Boise. It flows generally southwest, descending through a basalt canyon to fill the Anderson Ranch Reservoir, then turns northwest in central Elmore County. It joins the main stream as the southern arm of Arrowrock Reservoir, 20 miles east of Boise.

The river was called "Reed's River" in the early 19th century, named after Pacific Fur Company employee John Reed, who explored parts of the river throughout 1813 and 1814.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1256 Post by nrobertb » Thu Aug 22, 2019 1:10 pm

The Red River (French: Rivière rouge or Rivière Rouge du Nord, American English: Red River of the North) is a North American river. Originating at the confluence of the Bois de Sioux and Otter Tail rivers between the U.S. states of Minnesota and North Dakota, it flows northward through the Red River Valley, forming most of the border of Minnesota and North Dakota and continuing into Manitoba. It empties into Lake Winnipeg, whose waters join the Nelson River and ultimately flow into Hudson Bay.

Several urban areas have developed on both sides of the Red River, including those of Fargo-Moorhead and Grand Forks-East Grand Forks in states of North Dakota and Minnesota, respectively, in the United States and Winnipeg in Canada. The Red is about 550 mi long, of which about 395 mi are in the US. The river falls 230 ft on its trip to Lake Winnipeg, where it spreads into the vast deltaic wetland known as Netley Marsh.

In the United States, the Red River is sometimes called the Red River of the North. This distinguishes it from the so-called Red River of the South, a tributary of the Atchafalaya River that forms part of the border between Texas, Oklahoma, and Arkansas.

Long a highway for trade, the Red has been designated as a Canadian Heritage River.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1257 Post by nrobertb » Fri Aug 23, 2019 10:35 am

The Red River, or sometimes the Red River of the South, is a major river in the southern United States. It was named for the red-bed country of its watershed. It is one of several rivers with that name. Although it was once a tributary of the Mississippi River, the Red River is now a tributary of the Atchafalaya River, a distributary of the Mississippi that flows separately into the Gulf of Mexico. It is connected to the Mississippi River by the Old River Control Structure.

The south bank of the Red River formed part of the US–Mexico border from the Adams–Onís Treaty (in force 1821) until the Texas Annexation and the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo.

The Red River is the second-largest river basin in the southern Great Plains. It rises in two branches in the Texas Panhandle and flows east, where it acts as the border between the states of Texas and Oklahoma. It forms a short border between Texas and Arkansas before entering Arkansas, turning south near Fulton, Arkansas, and flowing into Louisiana, where it flows into the Atchafalaya River. The total length of the river is 1,360 miles, with a mean flow of over 57,000 cubic feet per second at the mouth.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1258 Post by nrobertb » Sat Aug 24, 2019 6:30 pm

Jim Hawkins was a charter member of company d of the Texas rangers .
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