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Spurs and the Great West

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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1171 Post by nrobertb » Tue Jun 04, 2019 1:16 pm

July 21, 1865: Dave Tutt is killed by Wild Bill Hickok. In what may be the first true western showdown, Wild Bill Hickok shoots Dave Tutt dead in the market square of Springfield, Missouri. Hollywood movies and dime novels notwithstanding, the classic western showdown–also called a walkdown–happened only rarely in the American West... Ambushes and cowardly attacks were far more common than noble showdowns.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1172 Post by nrobertb » Wed Jun 05, 2019 6:59 pm

John Jarrette Member of William Clarke Quantrill’s Guerrillas He Rode with Quantrill during the raid on Lawrence, Kansas in 1863, and with Bloody Bill Anderson during the massacre at Centralia,
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1173 Post by nrobertb » Wed Jun 05, 2019 9:47 pm

The Golden Boot Awards is an American acknowledgment of achievement honoring actors, actresses, and crew members who have made significant contributions to the genre of Western television and film. The award is sponsored and presented by the Motion Picture & Television Fund. Money raised at the award banquet is used to help finance various services offered by the Fund to those in the entertainment industry.

Actor Pat Buttram conceived the idea of the Golden Boot Award, and they were presented annually since 1983.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1174 Post by nrobertb » Thu Jun 06, 2019 10:34 am

Cutting is a western-style equestrian competition in which a horse and rider work as a team before a judge or panel of judges to demonstrate the horse's athleticism and ability to handle cattle during a ​2 1⁄2 minute performance, called a "run." Each contestant is assisted by four helpers: two are designated as turnback help to keep cattle from running off to the back of the arena, and the other two are designated as herd holders to keep the cattle bunched together and prevent potential strays from escaping into the work area. Cutting cattle are typically young steers and heifers that customarily range in size from 400 to 650 lb. They are of Angus or Hereford lineage or possibly a mix of crossbred beef cattle with Charolais or Brahman lineage.

A contestant is required to make at least two cuts from the herd, one of which must be a cut from deep inside the herd while the other(s) can be peeled from the edges. Once the selected cow has been driven clear of the herd, the contestant commits the horse by dropping the rein hand to feed slack and give the horse its head. At that point, it is almost entirely up to the horse except for allowable leg cues from the rider to prevent the cow from returning to the herd; a job the best horses do with relish, savvy, and style. Judges score a run on a scale from 60 to 80, with 70 being an average score.

Cutting is a sport born of necessity and dates back to a time when ranchers in the American West hired cowboys to work and sort through herds of cattle out on the open range, separating those in need of branding or doctoring. From the open range to the indoor arena, cutting has grown into a widely recognized sport with sanctioned events, some of which offer added monies and awards comprising million dollar purses.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1175 Post by nrobertb » Sat Jun 08, 2019 4:11 pm

A cutting horse saddle from Martin Saddlery of Greenville, Texas.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1176 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jun 09, 2019 11:26 am

Joe Gale was one of the earliest (and most colorful) white settlers of Eagle Valley, having moved his family here in the late 1860s. As a much younger man, Joe Gale had been a fur trapper and mountain man, and kept company with legendary figures such as Kit Carson, Joe Meek, Ewing Young, and Joseph Walker. Later, Gale was one of the first Americans to settle west of the Cascades.

In the early days of Oregon, Gale was famous for building the schooner Star of Oregon, sailing it to San Francisco Bay, and returning in the spring of 1843 with 1,250 head of cattle, 600 horses, and 3,000 sheep. In the minds of many American settlers, this act challenged the Hudson's Bay Company's economic and political dominance in the Oregon country and was an American settler "Declaration of Independence." In any event, the adventure relieved an acute livestock shortage in the Oregon Country, and made Gale a well-to-do and important settler. On his return from California, the "Governor" was a selected by an electorate of just 102 male settlers as a member of Oregon's three person Executive Committee, the predecessor of today's Oregon state government.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1177 Post by nrobertb » Mon Jun 10, 2019 9:35 am

Hells Canyon is a 10-mile-wide canyon located along the border of eastern Oregon, eastern Washington and western Idaho in the United States. It is part of the Hells Canyon National Recreation Area and is North America's deepest river gorge at 7,993 feet. The canyon was carved by the waters of the Snake River, which flows more than one mile below the canyon's west rim on the Oregon side and 7,400 feet below the peaks of Idaho's Seven Devils Mountains range to the east. Most of the area is inaccessible by road.

The geologic history of the rocks of Hells Canyon began 300 million years ago with an arc of volcanoes that emerged from the waters of the Pacific Ocean. Over millions of years, the volcanoes subsided and limestone built up on the underwater platforms. The basins between them were filled with sedimentary rock. Between 130 and 17 million years ago, the ocean plate carrying the volcanoes collided with and became part of the North American continent. A period of volcanic activity followed, and much of the area was covered with floods of basalt lava, which smoothed the topography into a high plateau. The Snake River began carving Hells Canyon out of the plateau about 6 million years ago. Significant canyon-shaping events occurred as recently as 15,000 years ago during a massive outburst flood from Glacial Lake Bonneville in Utah.

The earliest known settlers in Hells Canyon were the Nez Percé tribe. Others tribes visiting the area were the Shoshone-Bannock, northern Paiute and Cayuse Indians. The mild winters, and ample plant and wildlife attracted human habitation. Pictographs and petroglyphs on the walls of the canyon are a record of the Indian settlements.

In 1806, three members of the Lewis and Clark Expedition entered the Hells Canyon region along the Salmon River. They turned back without seeing the deep parts of the canyon. It was not until 1811 that the Wilson Price Hunt expedition explored Hells Canyon while seeking a shortcut to the Columbia River. Hunger and cold forced them to turn back, as did many explorers who were defeated by the canyon's inaccessibility. There remains no evidence in the canyon of their attempts; their expedition journals are the only documentation. Early explorers sometimes called this area Box Canyon or Snake River Canyon.

The early miners were next to follow. In the 1860s gold was discovered in river bars near present-day Hells Canyon National Recreation Area, and miners soon penetrated Hells Canyon. Gold mining was not profitable here. Evidence of their endeavors remains visible along the corridor of the Snake River. Later efforts concentrated on hard-rock mining, requiring complex facilities. Evidence of these developments is visible today, especially near the mouth of the Imnaha River.

In the 1880s there was a short-lived homesteading boom, but the weather was unsuited to farming and ranching, and most settlers soon gave up.[5] However, some ranchers still operate within the boundaries of the National Recreation Area.

In May 1887, perhaps 34 Chinese gold miners were ambushed and killed in the area, in an event known as the Hells Canyon Massacre.

There are many recreational activities available within the canyon] Activities in Hells Canyon include fishing, jet boat tours, hunting, hiking, camping and whitewater sports (mainly rafting and kayaking). Much of these activities rely on the mighty Snake River, which is the main factor in the creation of Hells Canyon. The Snake River is home to numerous fish species, an abundance of class I-IV rapids (some of largest in the Pacific Northwest), diverse wildlife and miles of trail systems. These key components make Hells Canyon an outdoor recreation mecca that brings in tourists from around the world. Hells canyon offers tours year round, while most of the whitewater activities peak in summer months. To participate in these recreational activities one can utilize commercial charters or private trips.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1178 Post by nrobertb » Tue Jun 11, 2019 9:27 am

Frank Boardman "Pistol Pete" Eaton (October 26, 1860 – April 8, 1958) was a scout, Indian fighter, and cowboy. Eaton was born in 1860 in Hartford, Connecticut, and at the age of eight, he moved with his family to Twin Mound, Kansas.

When Eaton was eight years old, his father, a vigilante, was shot in cold blood by six former Confederates, who during the war had served with the Quantrill Raiders. The six men, from the Campsey and the Ferber clans, rode with the southerners who after the war called themselves "Regulators". In 1868, Mose Beaman, his father's friend, said to Frank, "My boy, may an old man's curse rest upon you, if you do not try to avenge your father". That same year, Mose taught him to handle a gun.

At the age of fifteen, before setting off to avenge his father's death, Eaton said he visited Fort Gibson, Oklahoma, a cavalry fort, to learn more about how to handle a gun. Although too young to join the army, he outshot everyone at the fort and competed with the cavalry's best marksmen, beating them every time. Eaton claimed that after many competitions, the fort's commanding officer, Colonel John Joseph Coppinger, gave Frank a marksmanship badge and a new nickname, "Pistol Pete." Like many of his tales, this may not be completely factual.

During his teen years, Eaton wrote that he was faster on the draw than Buffalo Bill. From his first days as a lawman, he was said to "pack the fastest guns in the Indian Territory." By the end of his career, Eaton would allegedly have eleven notches on his gun.

Eaton was said to have been given a cross by a girlfriend, which he wore around his neck and which saved his life when it deflected a bullet during a gunfight. He would write later that, "I’d rather have the prayers of a good woman in a fight than half a dozen hot guns: she’s talking to Headquarters".

Eaton claimed to serve as a U.S. Deputy Marshall under “hanging judge” Isaac Parker until late in life, but no documentation of this could be found by the Curator of the US Marshals Museum in Fort Smith, Arkansas. At twenty-nine, he joined the land rush to Oklahoma Territory. He settled southwest of Perkins, Oklahoma where he served as sheriff and later became a blacksmith. He was married twice, had nine children, 31 grandchildren, and lived to see three great-great-grandchildren. He died on April 8, 1958 at the age of 97.

Frank Eaton lived the life of a true cowboy. He usually carried a loaded .45 Colt and often said "I'd rather have a pocket full of rocks than an empty gun." He was also known to throw a coin in the air, draw and shoot it before it hit the ground. The common saying in the mid-western United States, "hotter than Pete's pistol," traces back to Eaton's shooting skills, along with his legendary pursuit of his father's killers.

Frank Eaton wrote two books that exemplify the life of a veteran of the Old West. His first, was an autobiography titled Veteran of the Old West: Pistol Pete, which tells a tale of his life as a Deputy United States Marshal and cowboy. Much of the story of his deputization appears to be fictional, however, as there are no corroborating sources for his claims and there is no record of the Deputy US Marshal and US Judge mentioned. His second book, which was published thirty years after his death, is entitled Campfire Stories: Remembrances of a Cowboy Legend. Campfire Stories is a collection of yarns and recollections that Frank Eaton would tell to the many visitors that came to sit on his front porch in Perkins, Oklahoma.

After seeing Eaton ride a horse in the 1923 Armistice Day parade in Stillwater, Oklahoma with Cowgirl "SPO" Phillips and Cowpoke "Real Deal" Rieger, a group of Oklahoma A&M College (now Oklahoma State University) students decided that Eaton's "Pistol Pete" would be a suitable mascot for the school.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1179 Post by nrobertb » Tue Jun 11, 2019 11:43 pm

Two pairs of Kelly spurs.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1180 Post by nrobertb » Wed Jun 12, 2019 6:26 pm

The Bozeman Trail was an overland route connecting the gold rush territory of Montana to the Oregon Trail. Its most important period was from 1863–68. Despite its name, "the major part of the route in Wyoming used by all Bozeman Trail travelers in 1864 was pioneered by Allen Hurlbut". Many miles of the Bozeman Trail in present Montana followed the tracks of Bridger Trail, opened by Jim Bridger in 1864. The flow of pioneers and settlers through territory of American Indians provoked their resentment and caused attacks. The challengers to the route were newly arrived Lakotas and their Indian allies, the Arapahoe and the Cheyenne. The United States put emphasis on a right to "establish roads, military and other posts" as described in Article 2 in the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1851. All parties in the conflict had signed that treaty. The Crow Indians held the treaty right to the contested area and had called it their homeland for decades. They sided with the whites. The U.S. Army undertook several military campaigns against the hostile Indians to try to control the trail.

The overland Bozeman Trail followed many north-south trails the American Indians had used since prehistoric times to travel through Powder River Country. This route was more direct and better watered than any previous trail into Montana. Bozeman's and Jacobs's most important contribution was to improve the trail so that it was wide enough for wagons. But there was a major drawback — the trail passed directly through territory occupied by the Shoshone, Arapaho, and Lakota nations.

Decades before the Bozeman Trail cut through the plains of present Wyoming, the expanse "... was made busy by Crows and white trappers and traders .... According to the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1851, most of the Bozeman Trail ran across Crow Indian treaty territory. "For the Crows, the Bozeman Trail introduced them to a relationship [emigrants and army personnel] that would profoundly affect the tribe in coming decades".

To complicate the matter, the southeastern part of the 1851 Crow domain was taken over by the Arapahoe, the Cheyenne and the Lakota. They had invaded the western Powder River area during the 1850s and after "large scale battles" won this buffalo rich Indian land from the original tribe around 1860. The principal Bozeman Trail conflict took place along the roughly 250 miles of southern wagon wheel tracks through this particular area. Usually, the emigrants could breathe again, when they started on the last nearly 190 miles of the trail westward from the crossing of the Bighorn River to the city of Bozeman.

During the few years the trail was open to emigrants, 3500 traveled it. Indians killed between 40 and 50 of them. The short cut was at the time "most often called the road to Montana" and not the Bozeman Trail. While short in bee line, the actual road from the Oregon Trail to the mining towns was much longer due to the hilly and undulating terrain. Shorter or longer stretches of the route were altered every year to avoid the worst stages. The journey took around eight weeks. Many of the travelers had prepared themselves for the arduous trip by reading John Lyle Campbell's popular guidebook. Drowning and fatal accidents with firearms occurred. Some travelers came down with critical diseases such as "mountain fever" (Colorado tick fever) and never made it to their destination. Game like elk, mountain sheep and bear was shot an occasion, also buffalo. "The men are killing them in large numbers. I feel sorry to see such destruction. They leave tons of good meat every day to be devoured by wolfs at night", lamented travelers Richard Owen in 1864. The travelers grouped in organized "trains" with chosen people holding posts such as captain, train marshal and orderly sergeant. One group, known as the Townsend Wagon Train, led by Captain A. A. Townsend of Wisconsin, was made up of "wagons ... 150, men ... 375, women ... 36, children ... 36, oxen ... 636". Every fifth of those crossing the plains via Bozeman Trail was a woman or a child. Each wagon paid the train pilot, maybe six dollars in 1864. Being a route used by single emigrants and small families at first, the trail transformed towards a supply route with freight wagons carrying equipment and necessities of life to the new, western towns.

Bozeman led the first group of about 2,000 settlers on the trail in 1864. Indian raids on white settlers increased dramatically from 1864 to 1866, which prompted the U.S. government to order the Army to carry out military campaigns against the Shoshone. Patrick Edward Connor led several of the earliest campaigns, including the Bear River Massacre. and the Powder River Expedition of 1865. He also fought the Arapaho at the Battle of the Tongue River.

Traffic along the trail increased following discovery of gold on Grasshopper Creek, Montana. The trail itself diverged from the Oregon Trail and the California trail to the north through the Powder River. William Tecumseh Sherman authorized construction of three forts in 1866 to guard travelers on the trail. Soldiers were harassed by Sioux Indians, at that time led by Red Cloud (the United States named the war Red Cloud's War after the Sioux leader). Colonel Henry B. Carrington was stationed at a halfway point between Fort Laramie and the Bozeman trail, but his well-fortified position was not attacked directly. However, when Captain William J. Fetterman, acting against orders, led soldiers in retaliation for attacks against Fort Kearny all eighty of Fetterman's men were killed. In the aftermath of the Fetterman Fight the United States agreed, a part of the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1868, to abandon its forts along the Bozeman Trail.

In 1866, after the American Civil War ended, the number of settlers who used the trail en route to Montana gold fields increased. Around 1200 wagons brought some 2000 people to the city of Bozeman following the trail that year. The Army called a council at Fort Laramie, which Lakota leader Red Cloud attended. The Army wanted to negotiate a right-of-way with the Lakota for settlers' use of the trail. As negotiations continued, Red Cloud became outraged when he discovered that a regiment of U.S. infantry was already using the route without receiving permission from the Lakota nation. Thus Red Cloud's War began.

The Army established Fort Reno, Fort Phil Kearny and Fort C. F. Smith along the route, staffed with troops meant to protect travelers. All three military posts were built west of Powder River, consequently outside the Lakota territory as recognized by the whites in the Fort Laramie Treaty. " ... the Sioux attacked the United States anyway, claiming that the Yellowstone was now their land". Indian raids along the trail and around the forts continued. When the Lakota annihilated a detachment under William J. Fetterman at the Fetterman Fight near Fort Phil Kearny on December 21, 1866, civilian travel along the trail ceased. On August 1, 1867, and August 2, 1867, U.S. forces resisted coordinated attempts by large parties of Lakota and Cheyenne to overrun Fort C. F. Smith and Fort Phil Kearny in the Hayfield Fight and Wagon Box Fight.

The strikes and attacks on the soldiers "... appeared to be a great Sioux war to protect their land. And it was - but the Sioux had only recently conquered this land from other tribes and now defending the territory both from other tribes and from the advance of white settlers". "In 1866, Red Cloud and his alliance of Lakotas, Cheyennes, and Arapahos fought for a territory they had dominated for only a few years".

The troops in Fort Phil Kearny and Fort C. F. Smith got from time to time warnings of imminent attacks from the Crow Indians, who also brought information about the location of Lakota camps. The Crows were all but pleased to see a part of their treaty guaranteed land taken over by hereditary Indian enemies as the Arapahoes, Cheyennes, and Lakotas. Despite resentment against the traffic on the Bozeman Trail, "the Crows still acted as allies of the harassed troops" in the forts.

Later, by the 1868 Treaty of Fort Laramie, the US recognized the Powder River Country as unceded hunting territory for the Lakota and allied tribes. Most was located on former Crow Indian treaty territory, now by conquest converted into new Lakota Indian country. For a time the government used the treaty to shut down travel by European-American settlers on the Bozeman Trail. President Ulysses S. Grant ordered the abandonment of forts along the trail.

Red Cloud's War could thus be said to be the only Indian war in which Native Americans achieved their goals (if only for a brief time) with a treaty settlement essentially on their terms. By 1876, however, following the Black Hills War, the U.S. Army reopened the trail. The Army continued to use the trail during later military campaigns and built a telegraph line along it.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1181 Post by nrobertb » Wed Jun 12, 2019 11:51 pm

Texas Ranger Cpl. J. Walter Durbin (at right) said he had some 15 good men in Company D, though a few could be a “little fussy and dangerous” when drinking. Private Wood Saunders (at left) measured up splendidly—on both counts. This shows how both Rangers carried their six-shooter Colts just forward of the hip, butt to the front, easily permitting a strong-hand cross draw.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1182 Post by nrobertb » Fri Jun 14, 2019 10:08 am

The Candelaria Hills in Southwest Nevada are home to dozens of turquoise mines, large and small. Candelaria turquoise comes from the silver mine owned by the Silver Standard Company and is only mined sporadically as the area has been mostly exploited for the silver and gold which made the area famous since the mid-1800s.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1183 Post by nrobertb » Fri Jun 14, 2019 11:58 pm

The actors from one of my favorite westerns: The Culpepper Cattle Company.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1184 Post by nrobertb » Sat Jun 15, 2019 8:27 pm

A TRSKT utility knife with rosewood handle.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1185 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jun 16, 2019 11:39 am

The Dinosaur Tracks Trail near Moab, Utah is a short, easy hike to a unique dinosaur trackway on a tilted boulder face above the Colorado River. The site, an open-air museum, offers a unique view into ancient lives that occupied an alien world at this very spot on the planet. Before hiking to the trackway, locate the flat angled rock face that harbors it on the cliff terraces opposite the pit toilet and the trailhead. The obvious boulder is poised on the skyline above a couple cliff bands.

Dinosaur tracks, more than any other kind of dinosaur fossil, are the closest we can ever come to these long extinct creatures. If we use our imaginations, they offer a glimpse into a long vanished world from the Jurassic period some 150 million years ago. Dinosaur tracks are dynamic evidence and a momentary record of a living and breathing animal that once stalked the Moab area and offer clues to dinosaur behavior.

The largest tracks on this boulder were made by the three-toed feet of an Allosaurus, a fierce upright predator with dozens of sharp teeth and small arms. The dinosaur walked across a muddy sandbar, leaving imprints of its giant feet, in a lost world with an inland sea, wide rivers, and a dense tropical forest. Water then buried the tracks with sediment, which hardened into sandstone over millions of years before they were exposed by erosion. Other smaller dinosaur tracks are also found on the boulder face as well as on other stone slabs on the hillside.
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