Well, the board is either fixed, or it's going to run terribly. Cross your fingers and hope for the best. I'm at my technical limit right now.

Spurs and the Great West

Message
Author
User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1092
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1036 Post by nrobertb » Fri Mar 08, 2019 9:56 am

The ringtail (Bassariscus astutus) is a mammal of the raccoon family, native to arid regions of North America. It is also known as the ringtail cat, ring-tailed cat, miner's cat or bassarisk. The ringtail is sometimes called a cacomistle.

The ringtail is buff to dark brown in color with pale underparts. Ringtails have a pointed muzzle with long whiskers resembles that of a fox (which is appropriate in that its name means ‘clever little fox’) and its body resembles that of a cat. These animals are characterized by a long black and white "ringed" tail with 14–16 stripes, which is the about the same length as its body. The claws are short, straight, and semi-retractable, and are perfect for climbing.

Ringtails are primarily nocturnal, with large eyes and upright ears that make it easier for them to navigate and forage in the dark. It uses its long tail for balance, as it is an adept climber. The rings on its tail can also act as a distraction for predators. The white rings act as a target, so when the tail rather than the body is caught, the ringtail has a greater chance of escaping.

In areas with a bountiful source of water, as many as 50 ringtails/sq. mile have been found. Ranging from 50 to 100 acres, the territories of male ringtails occasionally intersect with several females. Ringtails prefer a solitary existence but may share a den or be found mutually grooming one another. They exhibit limited interaction except during the breeding season, which occurs in the early spring. Occasional prey to coatis, foxes, coyotes, bobcats, lynxes, and mountain lions, the ringtail is rather adept at avoiding predators. The ringtail’s success in deterring potential predators is largely attributed to its ability to excrete musk when startled or threatened. The main predators of the ringtail are the Great Horned Owl and the Red-tailed Hawk. Ringtails can survive for long periods on water derived from food alone, and have urine which is more concentrated than any other mammal studied, an adaptation which allows for maximum water retention.

The ringtail is found in the southwestern United States in southern Oregon, California, eastern Kansas, Oklahoma, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, southern Nevada, Utah and Texas. The ringtail is the state mammal of Arizona.

It is commonly found in rocky desert habitats, where it nests in the hollows of trees or abandoned wooden structures. The ringtail has been found throughout the Great Basin Desert, which stretches over several states (Nevada, Utah, California, Idaho, and Oregon) as well as the Sonoran desert in Arizona, and the Chihuahuan Desert in New Mexico, Texas, and northern Mexico. The ringtail also prefers rocky habitats associated with water, such as the riparian canyons, caves, or mine shafts.

The ankle joint is flexible and is able to rotate over 180 degrees, making it an agile climber. Their long tail provides balance for negotiating narrow ledges and limbs, even allowing them to reverse directions by performing a cartwheel. Ringtails also can ascend narrow passages by stemming (pressing all feet on one wall and their back against the other or pressing both right feet on one wall and both left feet on the other), and wider cracks or openings by ricocheting between the walls.

Small vertebrates such as passerine birds, rats, mice, squirrels, rabbits, snakes, lizards, frogs and toads are the most important foods during winters. However, the ringtail is omnivorous, as are all procyonids. Berries and insects are important in the diet year-round, and become the primary part of the diet in spring and summer along with other fruit.
Attachments
ringtail-28073.jpg
ringtail-28112.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1092
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1037 Post by nrobertb » Fri Mar 08, 2019 9:31 pm

More spurs.
Attachments
3.jpg
2d_1_b.jpg
2d_1_b.jpg (27.3 KiB) Viewed 347 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1092
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1038 Post by nrobertb » Sat Mar 09, 2019 12:09 pm

Great western character actors.
Moviegoers can be forgiven if they thought that stocky, jaunty Rhys Williams was a jovial Irishman, as he often played that type of character, but his role as a Welsh miner in John Ford's classic How Green Was My Valley (1941) (his film debut) was much closer to home for him, as he was born and raised in Wales. In fact, he served as a technical advisor and Welsh language consultant on the film. He began his career on the British stage, and traveled the country as a member of various Shakespearean stock companies, even joining the famed Globe Theater company for a spell. Once he began his career in Hollywood, though, he became one of the busiest supporting actors in the business. He appeared in everything from action pictures to mysteries to westerns to musicals. One of his few villainous roles was as a weaselly American reporter in Tokyo on the payroll of the Japanese government just prior to World War II in Blood on the Sun (1945). In addition to his prolific film work, he did much television over the years, appearing in everything from Maverick (1957) to Mission: Impossible (1966). He died in Santa Monica, California, in 1969, shortly before his last film, Skullduggery (1970), was released.

He made his film debut in How Green Was My Valley (1941), which takes place in rural Wales. The movie was actually filmed in Hollywood with a cast of English, Irish, Scottish and American actors. Originally hired solely to coach the actors in their Welsh accents, Williams, who was the only genuine Welshman on the set,
Attachments
williams.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1092
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1039 Post by nrobertb » Tue Mar 12, 2019 6:49 pm

Pairs of spurs.
Attachments
3d_1_b.jpg
3d_1_b.jpg (23.84 KiB) Viewed 309 times
3a_1_b.jpg
3a_1_b.jpg (15.4 KiB) Viewed 309 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1092
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1040 Post by nrobertb » Wed Mar 13, 2019 2:56 pm

Great western character actors
Of Swedish descent, burly, light-haired character actor Karl Swenson was born in Brooklyn and started his four-decade career on radio. Throughout the late 30s and 40s, his voice could be heard all over the airwaves, appearing in scores of daytime serials ("Lorenzo Jones") and mystery dramas ("Inner Sanctum Mysteries"). It was during his lengthy work in tv that he met his wife, stage and radio actress Joan Tompkins. They appeared together throughout their careers on TV and in a few films. In the 1950s, he kept afloat on TV in rugged guest spots (Dr. Kildare (1961), Gunsmoke (1955), Maverick (1957), Mission: Impossible (1966) and Hawaii Five-O (1968)). He didn't appear in films until age 50+ with minor roles in Kings Go Forth (1958), North to Alaska (1960), The Birds (1963) and The Sons of Katie Elder (1965). His voice was also well utilized in such animated features as The Sword in the Stone (1963) as the voice of Merlin. Karl met actor Michael Landon on the set of Bonanza (1959), appearing in four separate episodes over time. Landon remembered him when he began to film Little House on the Prairie (1974). Cast in the recurring role of lumber mill owner Lars Hanson, he remained with the show until his death in 1978 of a heart attack. His character on the show also died.
Attachments
swenson2.jpg
swenson2.jpg (31.47 KiB) Viewed 286 times
swenson.jpg
swenson.jpg (29.62 KiB) Viewed 286 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1092
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1041 Post by nrobertb » Thu Mar 14, 2019 2:51 pm

The word peccary is derived from the Carib word pakira or paquira. A peccary is a medium-sized animal, with a strong resemblance to a pig. Like a pig, it has a snout ending in a cartilaginous disc, and eyes that are small relative to its head. Also like a pig, it uses only the middle two digits for walking, although, unlike pigs, the other toes may be altogether absent. Its stomach is not ruminating, although it has three chambers, and is more complex than those of pigs.

Peccaries are omnivores, and will eat insects, grubs, and occasionally small animals, although their preferred foods consist of roots, grasses, seeds, fruit, and cacti—particularly prickly pear. Pigs and peccaries can be differentiated by the shape of the canine tooth, or tusk. In European pigs, the tusk is long and curves around on itself, in peccaries the tusk is short and straight. The jaws and tusks of peccaries are adapted for crushing hard seeds and slicing into plant roots, and they also use their tusks for defending against predators. By rubbing the tusks together, they can make a chattering noise that warns potential predators to stay away. In recent years in northwestern Bolivia near Madidi National Park, large groups of peccaries have been reported to have seriously injured or killed people.

Peccaries are social animals, and often form herds. Over 100 individuals have been recorded for a single herd of white-lipped peccaries, but collared and Chacoan peccaries usually form smaller groups. Peccaries rely on their social structure to defend territory, protect against predators, regulate temperature, and interact socially.

Notable populations exist in the suburbs of Phoenix and Tucson, Arizona, where they feed on ornamental plants and other cultivated vegetation. There are also urban populations as far north as Prescott, where they have been known to fill a niche similar to raccoons and other urban scavengers. In Arizona they are often called "javelinas". Collared peccaries are generally found in bands of 8 to 15 animals of various ages. They defend themselves if they feel threatened, but otherwise tend to ignore humans.
Attachments
Collared_peccary.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1092
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1042 Post by nrobertb » Fri Mar 15, 2019 10:49 am

Bracken Cave is the summer home to the largest colony of bats in the world. An estimated 20 million Mexican Free-tailed Bats roost in the cave from March to October making it the largest known concentration of mammals. The cave is located in southern Comal County, Texas, outside the city of San Antonio. The 100-foot-wide crescent shaped opening to the cave lies at the bottom of a sinkhole, formed when the roof of the cave collapsed.

The cave and 1,521 undeveloped acres around it are owned by Austin, Texas-based Bat Conservation International, which restores the land to support native vegetation and an abundant variety of wildlife. Access to the cave is restricted to protect the habitat of the resident bats. Bat Conservation International offers evening guided tours to the cave to watch the bats emerge from the cave.

Bracken Cave has been featured in the media several times since its discovery. National Geographic Wild HD channel included Bracken Cave in its World's Weirdest Series, Episode: Freaks of the Sky. It was also featured in the first pilot episode of Dirty Jobs.

The Bracken Cave is the destination every March or April of over 20,000,000 Mexican Free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis). These bats fly as much as 1,000 miles from Mexico to this cave. After arriving in the cave, the migrant mothers give birth to pups. An astounding 500 pups have been recorded clinging to one square foot of the cave walls—an ingenious way for keeping warm. The city of San Antonio, a local developer, and conservation groups reached agreement on "a $20 milion deal" in 2014, to ensure that human development would not encroach on the bats, and that the sky near their cave would remain dark at night.

The bats consume several tons of insects per night, which according to research conducted in 2006, saves cotton farmers in south central Texas about $740,000 a year.
Attachments
Bracken_Cave_Bats.jpg
bracken.jpg
bracken.jpg (10.58 KiB) Viewed 221 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1092
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1043 Post by nrobertb » Fri Mar 15, 2019 6:45 pm

Natural Bridges National Monument is a U.S. National Monument located about 50 miles northwest of the Four Corners boundary of southeast Utah, in the western United States, at the junction of White Canyon and Armstrong Canyon, part of the Colorado River drainage. It features the thirteenth largest natural bridge in the world, carved from the white Permian sandstone of the Cedar Mesa Formation that gives White Canyon its name.

The three bridges in the park are named Kachina, Owachomo, and Sipapu (the largest), which are all Hopi names. A natural bridge is formed through erosion by water flowing in the stream bed of the canyon. During periods of flash floods, particularly, the stream undercuts the walls of rock that separate the meanders (or "goosenecks") of the stream, until the rock wall within the meander is undercut and the meander is cut off; the new stream bed then flows underneath the bridge. Eventually, as erosion and gravity enlarge the bridge's opening, the bridge collapses under its own weight. There is evidence of at least two collapsed natural bridges within the Monument.

In 1904, the National Geographic Magazine publicized the bridges and the area was designated a National Monument April 16, 1908 by President Theodore Roosevelt. It is Utah's first National Monument.

The Monument was nearly inaccessible for many decades (a three-day horseback ride from Blanding, Utah, the nearest settlement), as reflected by the visitor log kept by the Monument's superintendents. The park received little visitation until after the uranium boom of the 1950s, which resulted in the creation of new roads in the area, including modern day Utah State Route 95, which was paved in 1976.

The Monument's elevation ranges up to 6,500 feet. The Monument's vegetation is predominantly pinyon-juniper forest, with grass and shrubs (brittle brush, Mormon tea, sage, etc.) typical of high-elevation Utah desert. In the canyons, where there is more water and seasonal streams, riparian desert plants, such as willow, oak and cottonwood trees, thrive. Because the Monument has been closed to grazing for nearly a century, and off-road motorized travel is restricted, Natural Bridges contains extensive areas of undisturbed, mature cryptobiotic soils.

Potential bridge collapse is possible at Natural Bridges National Monument, especially along the span of Owachomo Bridge in Armstrong Canyon which is only 9 feet thick at the crest of its span.

The main attractions are the natural bridges, accessible from the Bridge View Drive, which winds along the park and goes by all three bridges, and by hiking trails leading down to the bases of the bridges. There is also a campground and picnic areas within the park. Electricity in the park comes entirely from a large solar array near the visitors center. In 2007, the International Dark-Sky Association named Natural Bridges the first International Dark-Sky Park, which is a designation that recognizes not only that the park has some of the darkest and clearest skies in all of the United States, but also that the park has made every effort to conserve the natural dark as a resource worthy of protection. To date, Natural Bridges has the only night sky monitored by the NPS Night Sky Team that rates a Class 2 on the Bortle Dark-Sky Scale, giving it the darkest sky ever assessed.

Horsecollar Ruin is an Ancestral Puebloan ruin visible from an overlook a short hike from Bridge View Drive. The site was abandoned more than 700 years ago but is in a remarkable state of preservation, including an undisturbed rectangular kiva with the original roof and interior, and two granaries with unusual oval shaped doors whose shape resembles horse collars (hence the site's name).
Attachments
Owachomo.jpg
Owachomo.jpg (19.29 KiB) Viewed 208 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1092
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1044 Post by nrobertb » Sat Mar 16, 2019 10:46 am

A pair of spur pairs.
Attachments
7d_12_sb.jpg
7d_12_sb.jpg (31.56 KiB) Viewed 194 times
7.jpg
7.jpg (12.89 KiB) Viewed 194 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1092
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1045 Post by nrobertb » Sat Mar 16, 2019 5:09 pm

The San Antonio River Walk (also known as Paseo del Río or simply as The River Walk) is a city park and network of walkways along the banks of the San Antonio River, one story beneath the streets of San Antonio, Texas, United States. Lined by bars, shops, restaurants, nature, public artwork, and the five historic missions, the River Walk is an important part of the city's urban fabric and a tourist attraction in its own right.

The River Walk is a successful special-case pedestrian street, one level down from the automobile street. The River Walk winds and loops under bridges as two parallel sidewalks lined with restaurants and shops, connecting the major tourist draws from the Shops at Rivercenter, to the Arneson River Theatre, to Marriage Island, to La Villita, to HemisFair Park, to the Tower Life Building, to the San Antonio Museum of Art, to the Pearl and the city's five Spanish colonial missions, which have been named a World Heritage Site, including the Alamo. During the annual springtime Fiesta San Antonio, the River Parade features flowery floats that float down the river.

In 1981 the Hyatt Regency San Antonio opened with a new pedestrian connector that linked Alamo Plaza to the River Walk with concrete waterfalls, waterways and indigenous landscaping. Known as the Paseo del Alamo, this river "extension" actually flows from Alamo Plaza into the San Antonio River through the atrium of the hotel. This connector not only allows the hotel to market itself as being on Alamo Plaza and on the River Walk, but it provides the city with an urban park that connects the city's two largest tourist attractions.

Many downtown buildings like the Casino Club Building have street entrances and separate river entrances one level below. This separates the automotive service grid (for delivery and emergency vehicles) and pedestrian traffic below, and creating an intricate network of bridges, walkways, and old staircases. The San Antonio Spurs had their five NBA Championship victory parades/cruises along the river.
Attachments
San_Antonio_Riverwalk.JPG
San Antonio.JPG

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1092
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1046 Post by nrobertb » Sun Mar 17, 2019 9:56 am

Yucca torreyi, Davis Mountains, Texas

Leaves of yucca torreyi are bluish or yellowish green in color, long (up to 55 inches), quite rigid, topped by a sharp spine and strongly curved in cross-section. They may be lined by a small number of curly filaments, towards the plant center. Old specimens grow tall (up to 20 feet), the rosettes supported by a woody stem which is covered by a thick blanket of dead leaves, and they branch quite readily. Torrey's yucca is one of several similar, tree-like yuccas of the Chihuahuan Desert.
Attachments
Yucca_torreyi.jpg
Yucca_torreyi.jpg (23.21 KiB) Viewed 162 times
davis-yucca.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1092
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1047 Post by nrobertb » Sun Mar 17, 2019 9:01 pm

Scorpions are predatory arachnids of the order Scorpiones. They have eight legs and are easily recognized by the pair of grasping pedipalps and the narrow, segmented tail, often carried in a characteristic forward curve over the back, ending with a venomous stinger. Scorpions range in size from 0.3 in. to 9 in.

The evolutionary history of scorpions goes back to the Silurian period 430 million years ago. They have adapted to a wide range of environmental conditions and can now be found on all continents except Antarctica. Scorpions number about 1750 described species, with 13 extant (living) families recognised to date. The taxonomy has undergone changes and is likely to change further, as genetic studies are bringing forth new information.

All scorpions have a venomous sting, but the vast majority of the species do not represent a serious threat to humans and in most cases healthy adults do not need any medical treatment after being stung. Only about 25 species are known to have venom capable of killing a human.
Attachments
Scorpion.jpg
Scorpion.jpg (14.11 KiB) Viewed 142 times

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1092
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1048 Post by nrobertb » Sun Mar 17, 2019 11:46 pm

Queho (born around 1880; his name was also spelled Quehoe on his grave or Quejo in other sources) was a Native American outlaw and renegade whose exploits became part of Nevada legend. Many deaths were blamed on Queho and so he earned the title of being the first mass murderer in the state of Nevada and "The mad Indian"

Queho was an outcast, being called a "half-breed" in the days when being half Native American was not accepted. Queho's mother was from the Cocopah tribe. It is said Queho was half Mexican because his father was a local miner, although this is not known with certainty. His mother died shortly after birth.

Queho took odd jobs around Eldorado Canyon. He is said to have killed his half-brother and a 100-year-old blind Indian known to Queho as Canyon Charlie. Queho had a club foot, which left a distinctive impression when he was being trailed. He is alleged to have eluded posses and killed for food and supplies. Some say the fugitive Queho was not responsible for all of the murders that took place around the time period he lived. Others say he was a cold-blooded killer who would do anything to stay alive and survive. Queho was blamed for the death of Maude ("Daisy") J. Douglas after a search outside the cabin at the Techatticup Mine in Nelson, Nevada. Queho "dead or alive" increased from an initial bounty of $1,000 to $3,000.

In 1940, prospectors working near the Colorado River discovered a cave containing the mummified remains of the Nevada desperado. It was suggested that he died from rattlesnake bite.His remains were buried only after being purchased by Queho's old nemesis, Frank Wait, a law officer, before being given to the Las Vegas Elks Club, who exhibited the remains at Helldorado Days. District attorney Roland Wiley secured the remains and gave Queho a proper burial at Cathedral Canyon, Nevada.

In 1965 while working at Willow Beach, Arizona for the Lake Mead National Recreation Area, I took the patrol boat across the Colorado River to see if I could find the cave. It was easy enough, being visible from the water as the photo shows. It was really just a shallow rock shelter. Behind the cave was a wooden ladder that he used to get away from anyone approaching from the river.
Attachments
queho-cave.jpg
queho.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1092
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1049 Post by nrobertb » Mon Mar 18, 2019 9:43 pm

The Black Hills of South Dakota is a dome, an elliptical arch with the oldest rocks at the center. If you think of it as a set of inverted nesting bowls, with each bowl representing a rock layer, you’ll be pretty close to a view of the Black Hills – but you need to slice the bowls off, or erode the rocks, so that what you end up with in map view is concentric oval rings representing each rock layer.

The various layers have variable resistance to erosion. Resistant rocks like sandstones and limestones make ridges, called hogback ridges because they tend to stand with a relatively high, linear, rugged crest above the sloping flanks. Rocks that are easily eroded tend to form valleys.

The Triassic red shales of the Spearfish Formation, which is at least partly equivalent to the Chugwater that we talked about yesterday, are among the least resistant rocks in the Black Hills, so they form a low, flat zone within the overall dome and concentric pattern of geologic contacts. The zone lies between a prominent limestone ridge, made of Mississippian and Pennsylvanian Limestone, partly equivalent to the Mississippian Madison that we talked about a few months ago, and a sandstone hogback made from Cretaceous strata. The intervening valley is called the Red Racetrack, a nearly continuous lowland that surrounds the Black Hills.

Most of the exposures of red rocks in and around the Black Hills, including around Devils Tower in northeastern Wyoming, are the Spearfish Formation. Gypsum appears as white bands within the red rocks. After 225 million years, probably during the recent glacial period when the Black Hills was much rainier than it is today, some of the gypsum dissolved in the subsurface. This left empty spaces – caves – that sometimes collapsed if they were close to the surface, creating sinkholes. Early Native Americans used some of these sinkholes as buffalo jumps, driving bison to them, and some, such as the Vore site adjacent to Interstate 90, are important archaeological sites.
Attachments
racetrack.jpg

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 1092
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI
United States of America

Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1050 Post by nrobertb » Tue Mar 19, 2019 9:37 am

Great western character actors:
Clu Gulager was born William Martin Gulager in Holdenville, Hughes County, Oklahoma. He grew up on his uncle's ranch as a cowhand and when he was old enough he joined the United States Marine Corps for a stint from 1946-1948. He got the acting bug being in army plays so when he left he used the GI Bill of Rights to study acting. During this time he met his wife, actress Miriam Byrd Nethery. Clu's career started off as bit parts on popular western shows usually playing the heavy. Shows like Wanted Dead or Alive, Have Gun Will Travel, Laramie, Riverboat. He scored big with The Untouchables as Mad Dog Coll, which led to him being offered the role of Billy the Kid on The Tallman from 1960-1961, which also starred Barry Sullivan as Pat Garrett. The show was pulled after two seasons by Congress because they didn't like the idea that kids were seeing the outlaw Billy the Kid as a hero. Clu's next big break was playing Deputy Emmett Ryker on The Virginian from 1964-1968. During this time he also fared very well as Lee Marvin's sidekick in the 1964 TV film The Killers, which was considered too violent for TV so it went to theaters. Having being burned out being a TV star he tried to break into films, mostly as a character actor. His stand out films were The Last Picture Show (1971, playing Ellen Burstyn's lover), McQ (1974) with John Wayne and A Force of One (1979) with Chuck Norris, with whom he would work in the 1990's on Walker, Texas Ranger. Clu was also cast in San Francisco International Airport, with Lloyd Bridges, which failed big time. Throughout the 70's and 80's he was in almost every show around, playing bit parts. Then the unthinkable happened: he found a second career as a horror film actor; he followed the footsteps of other TV actors who were stuck in TV hell, like his costar from The Virginian --Doug McClure-- and Christopher George. Both of them in late 70's and early 80's found new careers in B movies and late night horror films. Clu finally got a lead part in Dan O' Bannon's cult classic The Return of the Living Dead (1985). He also was in A Nightmare on Elm Street Part 2: Freddy's Revenge (1985) Throughout the 80's and 90's he would appear in TV and in the occasional horror flick. In 2005 he started acting in his son's horror films --the Feasts movies and Piranha DD in his 80's. Not letting age get in his way, he has been a horror fan favorite and still shows up at conventions at almost 90 now. You can say one thing about Clu: what a diverse career it has been for this awesome cowboy!
Attachments
clu.jpg

Post Reply

Return to “General Off Topic”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests