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Spurs and the Great West

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nrobertb
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#766 Post by nrobertb » Sat Nov 03, 2018 6:15 pm

When Eli Whitney Blake took over management of the Harpers Ferry Armory in 1842, he set about tooling up under his new contract from the U.S. government for making the model 1841 percussion rifle. Machinery and fixtures for making the 1822 contract flintlock musket had to be retooled or replaced in order to produce the lock and barrel of the new model. Whitney, Jr. had the good sense to hire Thomas Warner as foreman, who, as master armorer at Springfield Armory, had just been making the same kind of major changes there. Thomas Warner had spearheaded the drive to equip the Springfield Armory with a set of new, more precise machines and a system of gauging that made it possible to achieve, in the late 1840s, the long-desired goal of interchangeability of parts in military small arms.

The nickname "Mississippi" originated in the Mexican–American War when future Confederate president Jefferson Davis was appointed Colonel of the Mississippi Rifles, a volunteer regiment from the state of Mississippi. Colonel Davis sought to arm his regiment with the Model 1841 rifles. At this time, smoothbore muskets were still the primary infantry weapon and any unit with rifles was considered special and designated as such. Davis clashed with his commanding officer, General Winfield Scott, who said that the weapons were insufficiently tested and refused the request. Davis took his case to the President James Knox Polk who agreed with Davis that his men be armed with them. The incident was the start of a lifelong feud between Davis and Scott.

By the time of the Civil War, the Mississippi rifle was generally considered old-fashioned but effective. In the rush to arm troops in 1861 many new soldiers considered themselves fortunate to have any rifled arm while many of their comrades carried smoothbore muskets. It was carried by some Union troops up until at least 1863 (the 45th New York Infantry was still armed with theirs until after Gettysburg), but Confederate cavalry and sharpshooter units used them until the end of the war.

The Mississippi rifle was the first standard U.S. rifle to use a percussion lock system. Percussion lock systems were much more reliable and weatherproof than the flintlock systems that they replaced, and were such an improvement that many earlier flintlock rifles and muskets were later converted to percussion lock systems.

The Mississippi rifle was originally produced in .54 caliber, using 1:66 rifling and no provision for fixing a bayonet.

In 1855, the Mississippi rifle was changed to .58 caliber, so that it could use the .58 caliber Minie Ball that had recently become standard. Many older Mississippi rifles were re-bored to .58 caliber. The rifle was also modified to accept a sword type bayonet.

The first Mississippi rifles had a v-notch sight. This was later replaced with leaf sights with 100, 300, and 500 yard ranges. A ladder sight with ranges from 100 to 1100 yards in 100 yard increments was fitted on some later rifles.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#767 Post by nrobertb » Sun Nov 04, 2018 12:08 pm

A pair of August Buermann spurs.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#768 Post by nrobertb » Sun Nov 04, 2018 4:40 pm

Damascus folding knives with green wood and bone handles from The Engraver, which can have initials for gifts to groomsmen at weddings.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#769 Post by nrobertb » Mon Nov 05, 2018 10:26 am

An old bit from North & Judd, probably 1930's.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#770 Post by nrobertb » Mon Nov 05, 2018 3:56 pm

Another folding knife from The Engraver.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#771 Post by nrobertb » Tue Nov 06, 2018 1:08 pm

A group of spurs.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#772 Post by nrobertb » Tue Nov 06, 2018 8:11 pm

A bit by Hilason.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#773 Post by nrobertb » Wed Nov 07, 2018 11:23 am

An old pair of spurs with heel chains and jinglebobs.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#774 Post by nrobertb » Wed Nov 07, 2018 4:11 pm

nza-Borrego Desert State Park (ABDSP) is a California state park located within the Colorado Desert of southern California, United States. The park takes its name from 18th century Spanish explorer Juan Bautista de Anza and borrego, the Spanish word for sheep. With 600,000 acres (240,000 ha) that includes one-fifth of San Diego County, ABDSP is the largest state park in California and, the second largest in the contiguous United States.

The park occupies eastern San Diego County and reaches into Imperial and Riverside counties, enveloping two communities: Borrego Springs, which is home to the park's headquarters, and Shelter Valley.

The Native Americans of the surrounding mountains and deserts included the Cahuilla, Cupeño, and Kumeyaay (Diegueño) Indian tribes. It was the homeland of these peoples for thousands of years, and their artists created petroglyph and pictogram rock art expressing their cultures.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#775 Post by nrobertb » Thu Nov 08, 2018 10:25 am

A pair of spurs by Griffin.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#776 Post by nrobertb » Thu Nov 08, 2018 5:49 pm

Oak Creek Canyon is a river gorge located in northern Arizona between the cities of Flagstaff and Sedona. The canyon is often described as a smaller cousin of the Grand Canyon because of its scenic beauty. State Route 89A enters the canyon on its north end via a series of hairpin turns before traversing the bottom of the canyon for about 13 miles (21 km) until the highway enters the town of Sedona. The Oak Creek Canyon – Sedona area is second only to Grand Canyon as the most popular tourist destination in Arizona.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#777 Post by LCPfraTN » Thu Nov 08, 2018 7:18 pm

nrobertb wrote:Oak Creek Canyon is a river gorge located in northern Arizona between the cities of Flagstaff and Sedona. The canyon is often described as a smaller cousin of the Grand Canyon because of its scenic beauty. State Route 89A enters the canyon on its north end via a series of hairpin turns before traversing the bottom of the canyon for about 13 miles (21 km) until the highway enters the town of Sedona. The Oak Creek Canyon – Sedona area is second only to Grand Canyon as the most popular tourist destination in Arizona.
That drive along Route 89A is just gorgeous! Sedona and the surrounding area is one of my favorite places to visit.


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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#778 Post by nrobertb » Fri Nov 09, 2018 10:45 am

One of the most interesting wonders of the west is hiding right here outside of Bighorn National Forest, but so few even know it’s here! Crazy Woman Canyon shows off the best of Wyoming’s wilderness near the treacherous Bozeman Trail. Here, you’ll find a rushing creek, Native American folklore, and towering cliffs that will take your breath away.

Crazy Woman Canyon runs along Wyoming 33, known as Crazy Woman Canyon Road.
You can get there by following Wyoming 16 through Bighorn National Forest, between Hazleton and Buffalo.
The Canyon is named for the Crazy Woman Creek, and there are several legends about how it got the name.

The most known legend is the story of the Morgan family. The family was traveling via covered wagon when they were attacked by Sioux warriors. Three children and their fathered were killed, but Mrs. Morgan survived the attack. After witnesses the horrors, though, she lost her mind. She stole an axe from a warrior and attacked, killing four as the Sioux fled.

Soon after, a mountain man named Johnson came upon the bloody scene. He buried the husband and children, and tried to get Mrs. Johnson to leave. She refused, and he built her a small cabin. Eventually, he found her frozen body, dead from starvation. Locals knew about her presence near the stream, and dubbed it Crazy Woman Creek.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#779 Post by nrobertb » Fri Nov 09, 2018 4:25 pm

A pair of spurs by C.P. Shipley of Kansas City, MO.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#780 Post by nrobertb » Sat Nov 10, 2018 11:20 am

TOADLENA TRADING POST
Toadlena Trading Post building.Toadlena Trading Post operates in the same way trading posts have since the 1870s – directly with the weaver and her family. You are offered the unique opportunity to acquire a textiles of timeless beauty, acknowledged excellence and lasting value.
While you are here, be sure to read about Clara Sherman, master Navajo weaver, her weaving daughter and her weaving granddaughters. The Toadlena Trading Post exists today for the primary purpose of inspiring future generations of Navajo weaving excellence. Clara was recently honored twice for her life and weaving skills. They are the living proof that the weaving tradition is still alive.
The Toadlena Trading Post is located about 1 hour north of Gallup, NM on Highway 491 (old Highway 666).
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