Well, the board is either fixed, or it's going to run terribly. Cross your fingers and hope for the best. I'm at my technical limit right now.

A look inside: Hungarian 7.62x54 heavy ball, steel

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Zeliard
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A look inside: Hungarian 7.62x54 heavy ball, steel

#1 Post by Zeliard » Mon Jun 12, 2017 8:02 pm

Originally posted by carteach0.

Note: Unfortunately the images are missing. I've added placeholders just in case.

Today I had some time to play. The choice for this examination was
ten rounds of the sixty I have left of this breed. I purchased this ammunition from
a local gun shop, where it was advertised as Czech lead core light ball.
I paid $3 a box, so I wasn't too unhappy in any case.

Checking on 7.62x54.net, I researched the headstamp and visual indicators
to find it's most likely Hungarian heavy ball. Both steel core and steel case.

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Now, I have received a few notes asking how I am pulling the bullets on the
ammunition I am investigating. While I have several ways of doing this,
my choice when tearing down more than a few rounds is my RCBS collet
type bullet puller. I have collets for 6-7 different bullet diameters, each doing more
than what it's rated for. I have found the RCBS bullet puller to be robust and
powerful when used in a good press. Mine has lasted many years without issue.
I do own several inertia type bullet pullers of various makes, and I find they
work nicely for pulling down my own handloads when I haven't crimped them hard.

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Moving on to the ammunition in question, I pulled apart ten rounds of the Hungarian

heavy ball. I find a ten round sample to be sufficient in most cases.
In this case I found the bullets to be very tightly sealed to the case with a red
chemical sealer, and quite a heavy crimp. In fact, the bullet showed the results
of the crimp, and I had a heckuva time pulling the bullets on several of the rounds.

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The powder is a medium grain extruded grain about the size of IMR 4350.
I found it to differ in appearence from the typical IMR powder, being duller
in finish. A troubling note was that all the grains did not appear to be alike, with
some varying in shine compared to others. I usually associate this with powder
thats older or has been stored improperly.

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The cases were not copper washed, but did appear to have a clear laquer finish.
While their appearance was good inside and out, I found they had significant
weight variations. (I think it's time to start measureing case dimensions as well.)

The bullets are full metal jacket boat tails with a steel core. To satisfy my
curiosity on exactly what that means, I brought out my dremel tool with a
grinding wheel. Cutting the base back past it's indent showed solid steel at
the rear of the boat tail, with a copper jacket. Making a cut directly into
the side of the bullet, I found first a copper jacket, then a thin lead layer, then
a steel core.

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The bullets had significant weight variations, as well as diameter variations.

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Ok, now for some numbers. All weights are in grains and were taken with
an RCBS 10-10 beam scale. Bullet diameters were measured with a mitutoyo
0-1" digital micrometer.................

Powder: High- 48.4, Low- 47.0, Spread- 1.4 grains
Cases: High- 146.8, Low- 141.4, Spread- 5.4 grains
Bullet weight: High- 183.4, Low- 181.8, Spread- 1.6 grains
Bullet diameter: High- .3107", Low- .3101", Spread- .0006"

Here is some of the data graphed out:

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My conclusions, which are entirely my own opinions, and do not in any way
mean I am advising using or not using this ammunition.........

This ammunition has been assembled in ways that might be entirely
suitable to battle ammunition. That said, I certainly would not expect
stellar performance on the target range. The component variations were
far more than I would accept from commercial items. The crimp
used on the bullets might be necesary on ammunition used in machine
guns but it sure seems excessive in my judgement.

None of my Mosins shoot this ammunition worth a darn, with groups averaging
twice as large as the Polish light ball. It functions perfectly, but accuracy is wanting.
I doubt I'll bother reusing the components or buying any more of this particular
ammunition. What I have left will serve for trigger control and sight practice,
or plinking just for fun.

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Proud alumni of Transylvanian Polygnostic University. "Know enough to be afraid."

"Vertroue in God en die Mauser".-Faith in God and the Mauser.

"Send lawyers, guns and money." -Warren Zevon

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