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Russian sks stock refinishing

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c141b
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Russian sks stock refinishing

#1 Post by c141b » Sat Jun 17, 2017 4:57 pm

I bought a Russian sks minus fixed magazine. The stock shellac was chipping so i removed the shellac with denatured alcohol. I have some leather dye Mahogany, which gives of a dark reddish color.I put some on the inside of the stock,to get a look of it. I like the idea of using blo and 1/3 toms. Tell me what you think I should do?
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joe7170
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Re: Russian sks stock refinishing

#2 Post by joe7170 » Sat Jun 17, 2017 6:58 pm

If your wanting more of a original finish, the dye and schellac will be what you seek. Stock does not look laminated?

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Re: Russian sks stock refinishing

#3 Post by 72 usmc » Sat Jun 17, 2017 10:13 pm

As far as I can see it does not look like a laminate stock with the redish glue. Stock color and the degree of any sanding is a matter of personal preference. I avoid sanding any stock because each scratch, dent, and stock cartouche is part of the stock's history. I like original patina. So you have to ask yourself if you like a Yugo/Chinese brown or a Russian red? There are many ways to get a color, but always test your mix first to see if you like it wet and then dry. Color can change and a dry surface will be enriched by a coat of shellac, min wax neutral stain, tung oil, BLO, wax, or marine grade teak oil. Some even use poly varnishes. Do you want a high shine or a natural patina? I never strip a stock or sand a stock. I rub down the old shellac finish into the stock with denatured alcohol or a more aggressive rub can be done with acetone. Sometimes this comes out perfect as for color, then I just wax it. Other times you need to enrich or add a color.

So for color you can use Fiebings shoe dye, Rit liquid dye or a base stain like Master's wiping stains, Mini Wax stains, amber shellac tinted with dye, or Pine tar tinted with dye. If you use a dye be sure it is alcohol based like Fiebings. See this new post about Mosin/ Mauser refinishing;
viewtopic.php?f=61&t=375

If you really took it down and sanded then see Candymans Aged oil finish:
viewtopic.php?f=61&t=101

and also his Three step finish for ideas. Candyman put tons of hours into reconstructing these wonderful, old, former SRF posts. This were stickies stored in a special spot for reference.
viewtopic.php?f=61&t=413

The rub to remove the original shellac takes time. No sanding. I like a method that is a time consuming task due to the amount of rubbing and the waiting time between rubs for the stock to dry. You are taking time to produce a somewhat original hand rubbed finish, not some painted on or sprayed poly finish. It can take up to 2-5 rubs to get the color and smooth wood look like the stock was handled over time. A sort of reproduced natural patina. You even rub more off at the normal contact points on a rifle so it has that used look. Use cotton tee shirt material for the rubs; if you need to get aggressive, then some fine 0000 steel wool with lots of the color mix as a lubricant to smooth down the wood surface. If it is real bad, you can use a smooth polished stone to bone the wood.

As for color------You can use a straight dye or a dye mix with alcohol. Then slowly rub it on watching how the color changes. Do not paint it on. You can also use a stain base straight out of a can or use it as a base for mixing a custom color by adding dye or a different stain. I like rubbing stains that have a thicker consistency and deeper color. See my post on Mosins & Mausers for the dye mixes.
viewtopic.php?f=61&t=375

Some add color to BLO, Pine tar, or shellac then rub this in. It all depends on the look you want and how brown or red you want the stock. Some like a lighter color of brown and just us amber shellac or pine tar.
Some like a deep Russian red so the tend to favor Mini Wax as a thin base that is easy to control because its a thin, lightly pigmented stain. They like Sedona red or Red mahogany, on the brownish side there is Golden oak with yellowish tint or the Red oak with a reddish tint. And these can be rubbed in directly from the can or you add dye to get a shade you like both in a wet state and then in its dry state. You must play around and practice on wood to see the results. Different woods produce different color results. Old master wiping stains work nice for a deep pigmented color you like directly out of the can. Or this can be added to the normal stains to enrich the color. Now just alcohol based dye ether straight out of the bottle, or a mix of colors also produces great results especially if not much of the original finish was not removed. I really like rubbing in the shellac into the wood--sometimes this alone produces a nice base .

After the color is applied to your liking, let it dry for at least a week. Then you rub it down again producing wear spots like an original patina. Finally, you have to decide if you want a thick finish, shinny finish, or a natural hand rubbed finish. Some use amber shellac and quickly rub a thinned coat on. You have to work fast with shellac and no going back over spots. You can also use a natural clear stain like mini wax NATURAL 209, Tru oil, BLO, Tung oil and/or teak oil. Or what I really like is just a wax finish like Rennanissance museum wax, Toms 1/3 wax, a gym floor wax, and best is the carnauba staples brand, antique orange paste wax or clear paste wax. The wax can be put on as many times as you want till you got that nice natural finish.

So what do you want, red or brown? What do you have, a sanded or non sanded stock? Final coat is to be ???
Practice on some spare wood or junk stocks to get a feel for restoring a stock--not refinishing a stock.
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Re: Russian sks stock refinishing

#4 Post by Candyman » Sun Jun 18, 2017 12:00 pm

I avoid sanding a stock whenever possible, even after using a chemical stripper. You don't have to sand the get a stock smooth. You can bone a stock with a hard wood dowel.
I have refurbished Mosins that have shellac finishes but I also have some that were not referred before being imported. The non refurbished one all have oil finishes with very little to no signs of shellac.

c141b
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Re: Russian sks stock refinishing

#5 Post by c141b » Sun Jul 02, 2017 4:19 pm

I finely got around to finish up the Russian, had to get a factory 10 round magazine from e bay.I got the rifle in a gun shop and the rifle appears to be painted black.It looks factory done and I can see no wear on the rifle and the bore very bright.The stock came out a little dark but I have seen other Russian sks that look similar.
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russian sks 006.jpg

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Re: Russian sks stock refinishing

#6 Post by checkmate19 » Sun Jul 02, 2017 6:22 pm

Very nice , I jsut did my M44 and was to lazy to get the dye . I guess its time I try the dye as suggested earlier . I really like the finish.

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