Well, the board is either fixed, or it's going to run terribly. Cross your fingers and hope for the best. I'm at my technical limit right now.

How to Repair Gouges in your Stock -Images Missing-

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Zeliard
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How to Repair Gouges in your Stock -Images Missing-

#1 Post by Zeliard » Mon Sep 11, 2017 8:10 pm

Original authors in bold.

Note: Missing images in italics.

Candyman.

This post will be to show you how to fill the gouges and gashes in your stock.
Our victim for this repair will be a 98k RC Stock.

For those of you that remember, this is the same stock that was used in the post on how to repair a cracked wrist on a bolt action stock.
I was just going to use this stock to post repairs and then sell it, but touhy made me such a great offer on a 98k RC without a stock so I decided to keep it and fix it up.

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I stripped off the shellac and did a light sanding. In this first pic, you can see one of the gouges. The stock had many gouges in it and I didn't want it to look like a beaver had chewed on it.

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I mixed some fiberglass resin and filled the gouges.

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I used sanding dust to keep the resin from running due to the fact that I was filling several gouges on both sides of the stock. You can pat the sanding dust into the resin to give it a little more color and texture, but if your stock is light in color it is best to use resin only.

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After the resin has dried, sand the resin level with the stock to dress it up. As you can see from several of these pic's there were many beaver bites on this thing.

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If you look close right behind where the recall bolt goes the stock had a crack in it. The resin was placed in it and clamped to seal the area.

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As you can see, filling gouges in your stock is very easy to do. This stock will get an oil finish when I'm done playing with it. And as always, if you have any questions just ask.

Well here it is all finished up.

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Orlando

Just curious how does the repairs look after putting on finish?
I have done the same thing but mixed woodglue and sawdust together making a very thick paste, then filled the gouge. I have then stained the stock and applied a oil finish. The repairs usually blend in pretty well.
I wouldn't think the resin would take a stain very well, but I guess if you aren't staining prior to applying a finish it would work

Candyman

Once the finish is on the stock the gouge repairs will blend in better.
The first time I ever used this type of repair was back in 1988 on my Marlin 1894CS 357 mag lever action. A friend dropped it and it landed on the corner of my tool box. That was one deep gouge in the forearm. #-o Well that stock has a nice BLO finish on it and the repair is still holding after a few thousand rounds and 20 years.

Orlando

Would "Epoxy glue" work in place of fiberglass resin?

Candyman

I have tried other types of epoxy but have yet found one that works as good. They ether do not soak into the wood good, dry too fast or just don't work good with the finishs that are used on gunstocks.
Here are some pic's of my Marlin and the 20 year old repair. I just took the pic's a few min. ago. The repair shows up more in the bright sun light.

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Tons

What kind of fiberglass resin was used in this repair?

Candyman

I use Brownell's Acraglas for all of my repairs. It has about a 15 min. work time so, you don't have to rush.

Peckem

I have a light stock and mixed fine dust with resin before patching the gouge. The dried resin is quite a bit darker than the unfinished wood, when I wet the area to estimate how the finish take, it's worse.

I'm thinking I will just live with it as otherwise the repair is good - eyes closed you could not find it - but if there is anything I should or could do to improve the outcome I'd love to hear it.

Candyman

The problem with using sanding dust when the stock is light in color is that the sanding dust gets wet in the resin and will appear darker then the stock. If you are going to use sanding dust it needs to be lighter in color then the stock you are working on.
You only have two courses of action.

#1 Stain the stock darker to help blend the repairs.
#2 Remove the dark resin and start over.

If your not sure how dark your sanding dust will be after adding it to your resin, wet it with some denatured alcohol first and that will be very close to what it will look like in the resin.

Peckem

Will staining the stock not just darken both the epoxy repair and the timber to the same degree or does the epoxy resist staining?

Candyman

The epoxy will not take stain like the timber. After staining the timber, just lightly buff the epoxy with some steel wool and the stain will be removed.

mineralman55

I used Accraglas to fill in some deep gouges on a walnut M1 stock. I have previously sanded the stock, saved the dust and mixed in a little of the dust with the Accraglas/hardener to emulate the original color of the stock. Three hours later the gouge-fill was still gummy. Does mixing sanding dust with the Accraglas extend hardening time?

Candyman

As long as the sanding dust is dry, it will not effect the curing time of the Acraglas.
One of two things happened. You eather added too much hardner or not enugh.
Also; you need to use a lighter color sanding dust then the stock because, the Acraglas resin will wet the dust and make it look darker. To test the color of your sanding dust, just wet a little of it with some denatured alcohol to see how dark it will be.

Roy McLeod

I, use Simpson anchor systems eproxy-tie SET-XP--- Structural anchoring adhesive(equal mix eproxy type).
It works well on deep gouges and major repairs and hides these repairs well.
this product, can only be purchased at bulding supply cos or lumber yards.
The tubes are large, and use a dual cauking gun.
The end mixing tube need not be used, so you can mix small equal amounts.
You will find many uses, for this product.
Roy
Proud alumni of Transylvanian Polygnostic University. "Know enough to be afraid."

"Vertroue in God en die Mauser".-Faith in God and the Mauser.

"Send lawyers, guns and money." -Warren Zevon

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