Well, the board is either fixed, or it's going to run terribly. Cross your fingers and hope for the best. I'm at my technical limit right now.

Saving an old Mauser sporter stock. (BLO Finish) -Images Missing-

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Zeliard
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Saving an old Mauser sporter stock. (BLO Finish) -Images Missing-

#1 Post by Zeliard » Mon Sep 11, 2017 5:49 pm

Original authors in bold.

Note: Missing images in italics.

Note: Superfluous comments not included.

Candyman

As most of you know I do a lot of work on Milsurp stocks, but I also do work on many commercial stocks also. Every now and then this type of work will cross over as in this old stock.

This is a Walnut stock that was picked up for $20 at a gun show. It was probably made back in the early 60's buy one of the many companies that were using Mauser actions to build commercial sporter rifles.

The stock had an old high gloss varnish finish that had seen it's better days. It was cracked and chipped and was beyond saving.
My friend asked my to fit and refinish the oil stock to his CZ project rifle.

The stock had a few other problems;
#1 Rear pillar post rusted into the wood.
#2 Crack at the rear of the tang.
#3 Cut out for commercial trigger safety lever.
#4 The stock was cut to fit a commercial hinged trigger guard.
#5 The recoil pad screws were stuck.

And this is what was done to fix these problems;
#1 The pillar was removed and the bad wood was drilled out. The new pillar was glassed into place.
#2 I did my standard wrist repair, dowel and glass.
#3 Squared off the area and spliced in a new piece of Walnut.
#4 I fitted the stock to take a Military trigger guard.
#5 I just taped off the recoil pad so that it was not damaged while the stock was worked on.

Here is the stock as I got it. If you look close you can see the cracks in the finish at the rear sling stud and on the left side of the stock.

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Here is where the Commercial safety lever was, kind of like on a Remington 700.
I just squared off the cutout and spliced in a new piece of wood.
You can also see the repaired crack at the top of the wrist. The old finish had also been stripped off.

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Here is the repair after it was dressed up and stained.

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When it came to the finish my friend told me to do what I thought would be best for an all around hunting rifle, but he also wanted a finish that would be easy to keep up.

I am a big fan when it comes to an oil finish and this one was a no brainer.
I applied 2 Oil Scrubbed coats with BLO then 3 hand rubbed coats. The color of the stock is natural without stain.

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I cant wait to see it once he gets it blued.

bluebayou

Ho, Candyman, nice work as usual.

Couple of questions:
How do you shape the wood when you splice in like that? Do you grind it down with a sander till you get close and then shape it? What do you use to finish it to the existing contour?

Did the full size CZ action require any inletting difference? You say "fit and refinish", so I am wondering. I just bought a CZ527 and it L-O-V-E it. The next big purchase for me will be a 550, so I am just curious.

Candyman

I will sometimes use a dremel tool with a sanding drum to work the piece close to shape but I use hand files the most. I have some very corse files and some fine files. You can see some of the files I use in most of the repair post I do.
The action dropped right in but the trigger guard needed to be fitted.

bluebayou

Thanks for the quick reply. I wasn't sure if the leverage/pressure used with handfiles would pop that repair piece off. Just thinking.

Didn't think about a sanding drum on a Dremel. They are aggressive. I was tampering with my spare Enfield stock, trying to get the nosecap to fit onto it (2A nosecap onto surplus DP forearm). Was shocked how much wood they could remove very quickly.

Going to try your denatured alcohol and BLO scrub on Yugo Mauser that I have coming. No ovencleaner this go around.

walt mcguire

what kind of wax would you recommend to shine up some blo treatment. i would like a bit of a satin look without looking to glossy. thanks, walt. your stuff always looks gorgeous! thanks for the great work. :thumb: :thumb:

Candyman

Reg. Johnson or Min-Wax Paste wax will give you a nice shine if buffed with a soft clean cloth.

Tom's 1/3 Mix can be buffed but not as glossy.
Proud alumni of Transylvanian Polygnostic University. "Know enough to be afraid."

"Vertroue in God en die Mauser".-Faith in God and the Mauser.

"Send lawyers, guns and money." -Warren Zevon

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